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  1.  6
    Getting Science Wrong: Why the Philosophy of Science Matters. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2019 - Review of Metaphysics 72 (3).
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  2.  7
    From Myth to Modern Mind. A Study of the Origins and Growth of Scientific Thought, Volume I: Theogony Through Ptolemy., American University Studies, Series 5: Philosophy, Vol. 170.From Myth to Modern Mind. A Study of the Origins and Growth of Scientific Thought, Volume II: Copernicus Through Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):481-481.
    Ever since Auguste Comte articulated his Law of the Three Stages, positivism has maintained a stranglehold on the history and philosophy of science. Despite significant repudiations of this view, there remains a tendency to consider earlier science as an essentially more primitive form of human cognition. Thomas Kuhn’s warnings against this tendency, while widely accepted, have not always been heeded in particular studies. Part of the reason for this might be some dissatisfaction with Kuhn’s account of scientific paradigms in light (...)
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  3.  7
    Galileo's Logic of Discovery and Proof: The Background, Content, and Use of His Appropriated Treatises on Aristotle's Posterior AnalyticsGalileo's Logical Treatises: A Translation, with Notes and Commentary, of His Appropriated Latin Questions on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):174-175.
    In 1913 Pierre Duhem published a lecture in which he summarized his then startling discovery that Galileo owed a great deal to medieval scholastic natural philosophers. The result of this discovery was not only to establish the history of medieval science as an autonomous scholarly discipline, but also to initiate intensive research into the background and sources of Galileo's work. No scholar has contributed more in recent years to this research than William Wallace. His Prelude to Galileo and his Galileo (...)
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  4.  6
    Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition 400–1400. The Yale Intellectual History of the West. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):689-689.
    While it is no longer a commonplace among intellectual historians, the view of the Middle Ages as a dark age of ignorance still pervades the popular imagination. Auguste Comte and his fellow Enlightenment philosophes have indeed cast a long shadow. The shadow is long and dark enough that many students of the history of philosophy, for example, still begin their graduate studies under the impression that little work of importance was produced between Plotinus and Descartes—at least little that is relevant (...)
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  5. St. Augustine's Appropriation and Transformation of Aristotelian Eudaimonia.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - In Jon Miller (ed.), The Reception of Aristotle's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  6.  26
    The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):662-663.
    The Eleatic stranger in Plato's Sophist characterizes philosophy as an unending battle between two camps. It is, he says, a battle "between the Gods and the Giants" over the nature of reality. The Giants here are the materialists who attempt to explain everything in terms of underlying material mechanisms. The Gods, on the other hand, are the Friends of the Forms who find that material reality can only be explained by grounding it in a world of immaterial intelligible ideas. Clearly, (...)
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  7.  24
    Moral Dilemmas of Modern War: Torture, Assassination, and Blackmail in an Age of Asymmetric Conflict. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (3):397-399.
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  8.  8
    Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? Ruse’s Incomplete and Partly Sympathetic Answer.Michael W. Tkacz - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (1):169-172.
  9.  9
    Quaestiones super librum Posteriorum (review).Michael W. Tkacz - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):392-393.
    Michael W. Tkacz - Quaestiones super librum Posteriorum - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.3 392-393 Book Review Quaestiones super librum Posteriorum Walter Burley. Quaestiones super librum Posteriorum. Edited by Mary Catherine Sommers. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2000. Pp. x + 214. Cloth, $34.95. In his monumental Le Système du Monde, Pierre Duhem notes that it is difficult to link the fourteenth-century scholastic Walter Burley to any particular school on account (...)
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  10.  23
    Baroque Science by Ofer Gal and Raz Chen-Morris. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (3):660-662.
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  11.  23
    The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century.Michael W. Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):682-683.
    Among the striking elements of this description is the way in which Locke’s analogy, so bereft of an outward orientation, is employed to represent the modernist notion of self. This sharp contrast of classical and modern conceptions of the self is alone enough to justify Jerrold Seigel’s comprehensive study. There can be no doubt that something new regarding the concepts of soul, self, and personhood came into prominence with the advent of that Copernican Revolution in philosophy, the Cartesian turn. Indeed, (...)
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  12.  24
    De Animalibus.Michael W. Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):119-120.
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  13.  21
    Lennox, James G. Aristotle’s Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Science.Michael W. Tkacz - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):662-663.
  14.  19
    Galileo's Logic of Discovery and Proof.Michael W. Tkacz - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):174-176.
  15.  19
    From Myth to Modern Mind. A Study of the Origins and Growth of Scientific Thought, Volume I.Michael W. Tkacz - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):481-482.
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  16.  23
    Self-Motion From Aristotle to Newton.Michael W. Tkacz - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):655-657.
    Etienne Gilson once observed that Aristotle never had a notion of "life" for, if he was not a mechanist, still less was he a vitalist. Gilson's point was, of course, that Aristotle did not consider life to be some sort of internal force, nor was he prepared to reduce life to mechanical motions. Aristotle avoided both the vitalist and mechanist extremes in his distinctive conception of life as the proper activity of those things which have within themselves a principle of (...)
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  17.  18
    New Proofs for the Existence of God.Michael W. Tkacz - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 64 (3):660-662.
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  18.  25
    Aristotle’s Theory of the Unity of Science. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):426-427.
    Nothing has so plagued twentieth-century philosophers of science as the demarcation problem—the effort to determine what constitutes science and marks it off from other human pursuits. We have come to the end of the century with, to say the least, no consensus among philosophers on this issue. This has led some, such as Larry Laudan, to announce the abandonment of the demarcation project, urging philosophers to turn their attention elsewhere. One wonders, however, whether all the options have been explored. In (...)
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  19.  15
    Metaphysics From a Biological Point of View.Michael W. Tkacz - 2015 - Studia Neoaristotelica 12 (2):127-132.
  20.  20
    Albertus Magnus and the Animal Histories.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:103-113.
  21.  27
    Albertus Magnus and the Recovery of Aristotelian Form.Michael W. Tkacz - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 64 (4):735-762.
  22.  16
    Colish, Marcia L. Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition 400–1400.Michael W. Tkacz - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):689-690.
  23.  29
    On the Causes of the Properties of the Elements (Liber de Causis Proprietatem Elementorum) (Review).Michael W. Tkacz - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):373-374.
    Despite his seminal role in the history of philosophy, the thirteenth century thinker Albert the Great remains little known. Prior to World War II, his massive literary output was not fully analyzed by historians largely because, as Etienne Gilson put it, of the amazing "amount of philosophical and scientific information heaped up in his writings." After the war, Albert's work began to receive more attention. By 1955, the Louvain medievalist Fernand Van Steenberghen could confidently declare that Albert was the first (...)
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  24.  18
    On Animals: A Medieval Summa Zoologica.Michael W. Tkacz - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):371-373.
    The year 1249 marked a turning point in the intellectual career of Albert the Great. This was the year he finally acceded to the pleas of his Dominican confreres to compose a work explaining the natural science of Aristotle. The immediate product of this decision was Albert’s paraphrastic commentary on the Physics, but there were long-term results as well. This work was but the first part of what was to become one of the major literary productions of the Middle Ages; (...)
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  25.  15
    Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum.Michael W. Tkacz - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):399-400.
    In his monumental History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Etienne Gilson devotes only one paragraph in his chapter on fourteenth-century nominalism to Adam of Wodeham. He admits that this is partly due to the fact that little is known of Adam's philosophical views except that he is generally considered an Ockhamist. Gilson's treatment reflects the once widely held view that Adam's contributions to the history of philosophy were limited to expositions of William of Ockham. Adam was William's student (...)
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  26.  24
    Physics or Natural Hearing.Michael W. Tkacz - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):401-402.
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  27.  14
    How the Cold War Transformed Philosophy of Science: To the Icy Slopes of Logic.Michael W. Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):171-173.
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  28.  12
    Albertus Magnus and the Animal Histories: A Medieval Anticipation of Recent Developments in Aristotle Studies.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:103-113.
    During the past three decades, Aristotle studies have been significantly influenced by a series of ground-breaking investigations of the zoological works, especially the Historia animalium. As a result, contemporary Aristotle scholars have developed a clearer and more consistent interpretation of the zoology and have demonstrated its consonance with Aristotle’s logic and metaphysics. This revolution in Aristotle studies was anticipated by the medieval natural philosopher Albertus Magnus. As the first thinker since Theophrastus to pursue an Aristotelian research program in the life (...)
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  29.  19
    De Historia Animalium Translatio Guillelmi de Morbeka. Pars Prima: Libri I–V.Michael W. Tkacz - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):137-138.
    Anyone making even a cursory study of the intellectual life of medieval Europe will notice everywhere evident a lively interest in animals. The literary manifestation of this interest best known today is the tradition of the bestiary and the closely associated encyclopedia tradition. Such treatments of animals, however, are notable for their less than accurate descriptions wherein the factual was often mixed with the fabulous and preference often shown for the exotic, mythical, and imaginative over the scientific. This changed radically (...)
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  30.  11
    8. Faith, Science, and the Error of Fideism.Michael W. Tkacz - 2002 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 5 (1):139-155.
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  31.  17
    The Origins of Aristotelian Science.Michael W. Tkacz - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):608-609.
    Modern readers who have wrestled with the difficulties of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics can sympathize with the twelfth-century lament of John of Salisbury that there are "as many obstacles to understanding this work as there are chapters in it--and you are lucky if there are not more obstacles than chapters". One recent reader who has met with some success in overcoming these difficulties is Michael Ferejohn, whose book attempts to set out systematically the elements of the Aristotelian theory of scientific explanation. (...)
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  32.  17
    The Transformation of Natural Philosophy. The Case of Philip Melanchthon.Michael W. Tkacz - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):161-161.
    Since the eighteenth century, discussions of the relationship of natural science and religion have generally been driven by a fideism which seeks to separate strictly each of these human pursuits. This contrasts sharply with the synthetic approach of medieval scholastic philosophers who sought to integrate scientific research, metaphysics, and theology into a unified wisdom. The story of this historical shift is complex and, when fully told, will no doubt include contributions of historians of religion as well as historians of science (...)
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  33.  11
    Katherin A. Rogers, Anselm on Freedom Reviewed By.Michael W. Tkacz - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (3):217-219.
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  34.  11
    Desmond, Adrian and James Moore., Darwin’s Sacred Cause: Race, Slavery, and the Quest for Human Origins.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):573-575.
  35.  7
    De Animalibus: Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Part Three, Books XV-XIX: Generation of Animals. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):119-120.
    Historians of philosophy often overlook the fact that the reception of Aristotle's works in the Latin West during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries was largely the reception of a natural science. More than half the corpus is devoted to such topics as zoology, animal psychology, atmospheric studies, cosmology, chemistry, and physical mechanics. A full quarter of the corpus is devoted to zoology alone. This point was well understood among the first generation of Latin commentators. Scholars such as Robert Grosseteste and (...)
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  36.  4
    De Animalibus: Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Part Three, Books XV-XIX: Generation of Animals. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):119-120.
    Historians of philosophy often overlook the fact that the reception of Aristotle's works in the Latin West during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries was largely the reception of a natural science. More than half the corpus is devoted to such topics as zoology, animal psychology, atmospheric studies, cosmology, chemistry, and physical mechanics. A full quarter of the corpus is devoted to zoology alone. This point was well understood among the first generation of Latin commentators. Scholars such as Robert Grosseteste and (...)
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  37.  13
    Augustine's Invention of the Inner Self: The Legacy of a Christian Platonist (Review).Michael W. Tkacz - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):584-585.
  38.  5
    From Myth to Modern Mind. A Study of the Origins and Growth of Scientific Thought, Volume I: Theogony Through Ptolemy., American University Studies, Series 5. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):481-482.
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  39.  3
    Albertus Magnus and the Animal Histories:: A Medieval Anticipation of Recent Developments in Aristotle Studies.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:103-113.
    During the past three decades, Aristotle studies have been significantly influenced by a series of ground-breaking investigations of the zoological works, especially the Historia animalium. As a result, contemporary Aristotle scholars have developed a clearer and more consistent interpretation of the zoology and have demonstrated its consonance with Aristotle’s logic and metaphysics. This revolution in Aristotle studies was anticipated by the medieval natural philosopher Albertus Magnus. As the first thinker since Theophrastus to pursue an Aristotelian research program in the life (...)
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  40.  1
    Science & Christianity: Four Views.Michael W. Tkacz - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (1):253-256.
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  41.  4
    De Animalibus: Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Part Two: Books XI–XIV: Parts of Animals.Michael W. Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):141-142.
  42. Stanley B. Cunningham, Reclaiming Moral Agency: The Moral Philosophy ofAlbert the Great Reviewed By.Michael W. Tkacz - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (4):249-251.
     
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  43.  2
    Thomistic Reflections on Teleology and Contemporary Biological Research.Michael W. Tkacz - 2013 - New Blackfriars 94 (1054):654-675.
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  44. Agustín, el "Timeo" y la falacia cosmogónica.Michael W. Tkacz - 2011 - Augustinus: Revista Trimestral Publicada Por Los Padres Agustinos Recoletos 56 (220):205-212.
    El artículo estudia la apropiación que hace Agustín del argumento de Platón respecto a la existencia de un demiurgo cósmico en Timeo 27d-28c. Muestra cómo Agustín se enfrenta implícitamente a la falacia cosmogónica, haciendo algunas enmiendas al argumento de Platón, a fin de conservarlo para los teístas como modelo filosófico de los orígenes cósmicos.
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  45. Aristotle’s Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Science. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):662-662.
    Among the more important contributions to late twentieth-century Aristotle studies was Pierre Pellegrin’s La Classification des animaux chez Aristote: Statut de la biologie et unité de l’aristotélisme, which appeared in 1982. This revisionist reading of the Historia animalium not only directed scholarly attention to Aristotle’s hitherto little-studied biological works, but it also discouraged the attempt to understand these works solely in terms of developments in modern biology. The result was a flurry of activity on the part of scholars who attempted (...)
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  46. Albert the Great and the Aristotelian Reform of the Platonic Method of Division.Michael W. Tkacz - 2009 - The Thomist 73 (3):399-435.
  47. Neo-Darwinians, Aristotelians, and Optimal Design.Michael W. Tkacz - 1998 - The Thomist 62 (3):355-372.
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  48. Nicholas Rescher, Scholastic Meditations Reviewed By.Michael W. Tkacz - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (3):216-218.
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  49. Stanley B. Cunningham, Reclaiming Moral Agency: The Moral Philosophy of Albert the Great.Michael W. Tkacz - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (4):249.
     
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  50. Scientific Reporting, Imagination, and Neo-Aristotelian Realism.Michael W. Tkacz - 2004 - The Thomist 68 (4):531-543.
     
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