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Profile: Michael E. Zimmerman (University of Colorado, Boulder)
  1.  53
    The Nature of Intrinsic Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    At the heart of ethics reside the concepts of good and bad; they are at work when we assess whether a person is virtuous or vicious, an act right or wrong, a decision defensible or indefensible, a goal desirable or undesirable. But there are many varieties of goodness and badness. At their core lie intrinsic goodness and badness, the sort of value that something has for its own sake. It is in virtue of intrinsic value that other types of value (...)
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  2.  35
    Ignorance and Moral Obligation.J. Zimmerman Michael - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael J. Zimmerman explores whether and how our ignorance about ourselves and our circumstances affects what our moral obligations and moral rights are. He rejects objective and subjective views of the nature of moral obligation, and presents a new case for a 'prospective' view.
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  3.  66
    An Essay on Moral Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1988 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    This superbly crafted account of the notion of moral responsibility and of its relations to freedom, control, ignorance, negligence, attempts, omissions, compulsion, mental disorders, virtues and vices, desert, and punishment fills that gap. The treatment of character and luck is particularly sophisticated and well-argued.
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  4. Taking Luck Seriously.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):553-576.
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  5. Moral Responsibility and Ignorance.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1997 - Ethics 107 (3):410-426.
  6. Is Moral Obligation Objective or Subjective?Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):329-361.
    Many philosophers hold that whether an act is overall morally obligatory is an ‘objective’ matter, many that it is a ‘subjective’ matter, and some that it is both. The idea that it is or can be both may seem to promise a helpful answer to the question ‘What ought I to do when I do not know what I ought to do?’ In this article, three broad views are distinguished regarding what it is that obligation essentially concerns: the maximization of (...)
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  7. Environmental Philosophy From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.Michael E. Zimmerman - 2004
     
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  8. Luck and Moral Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1987 - Ethics 97 (2):374-386.
    The following argument is addressed: (1) a person is morally responsible for an event's occurring only if that event's occurring was not a matter of luck; (2) no event is such that its occurring is not a matter of luck; therefore, (3) no event is such that someone is morally responsible for its occurring. Two notions of control are distinguished: restricted and complete. (2) is shown false on the first interpretation, (1) on the second. The discussion involves a distinction between (...)
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  9. On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577-597.
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, from which he inferred what is here called the (...)
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  10. Responsibility, Reaction, and Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2010 - Journal of Ethics 14 (2):103-115.
    Many writers accept the following thesis about responsibility: (R) For one to be responsible for something is for one to be such that it is fitting that one be the object of some reactive attitude with respect to that thing. This thesis bears a striking resemblance to a thesis about value that is also accepted by many writers: (V) For something to be good (or neutral, or bad) is for it to be such that it is fitting that it be (...)
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  11.  4
    Heidegger's Confrontation with Modernity: Technology, Politics, and Art.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1990 - Indiana University Press.
    "Writing in a lively and refreshingly clear American English, Zimmerman provides an uncompromisingly honest and judicious account... of Heidegger’s views on technology and his involvement with National Socialism.... One of the most important books on Heidegger in recent years." —John D. Caputo "... superb... " —Thomas Sheehan, The New York Review of Books "... thorough and complex... " —Choice "... excellent guide to Heidegger as eco-philosopher." —Radical Philosophy "... engrossing, rich in substance... makes clear Heidegger's importance for the issue of (...)
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  12.  43
    Recent Work on Intrinsic Value.Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) - 2005 - Springer.
    Recent Work on Intrinsic Value brings together for the first time many of the most important and influential writings on the topic of intrinsic value to have appeared in the last half-century. During this period, inquiry into the nature of intrinsic value has intensified to such an extent that at the moment it is one of the hottest topics in the field of theoretical ethics. The contributions to this volume have been selected in such a way that all of the (...)
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  13. Moral Luck: A Partial Map.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
  14.  29
    Moral Luck.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
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  15. The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman.Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) - 2005 - Ashgate.
  16.  33
    A Plea for Accuses.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1997 - American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (2):229 - 243.
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  17. Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  18.  9
    Prospective Possibilism.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2017 - Journal of Ethics 21 (2):117-150.
    There has been considerable debate regarding the relative merits of two theses about moral obligation known as actualism and possibilism. Both theses seek to give expression to the general idea that one ought to do the best one can. According to actualism, one’s obligations turn on what would happen if one chose some course of action, whereas, according to possibilism, they turn on what could happen if one chose some course of action. There are two strands to the debate: the (...)
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  19. Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy.Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The volume documents, and makes an original contribution to, an astonishing period in twentieth-century philosophy—the progress of Arne Naess's ecophilosophy from its inception to the present. It includes Naess's most crucial polemics with leading thinkers, drawn from sources as diverse as scholarly articles, correspondence, TV interviews and unpublished exchanges. The book testifies to the skeptical and self-correcting aspects of Naess's vision, which has deepened and broadened to include third world and feminist perspectives. Philosophical Dialogues is an essential addition to the (...)
     
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  20. Understanding What's Good for Us.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying question of (...)
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  21.  2
    Taking Luck Seriously.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):553.
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  22.  26
    Moral Responsibility and the Moral Community: Is Moral Responsibility Essentially Interpersonal?Michael J. Zimmerman - 2016 - Journal of Ethics 20 (1-3):247-263.
    Many philosophers endorse the idea that there can be no moral responsibility without a moral community and thus hold that such responsibility is essentially interpersonal. In this paper, various interpretations of this idea are distinguished, and it is argued that no interpretation of it captures a significant truth. The popular view that moral responsibility consists in answerability is discussed and dismissed. The even more popular view that such responsibility consists in susceptibility to the reactive attitudes is also discussed, and it (...)
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  23.  59
    Feminism, Depp Ecology, and Environmental Ethics.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):21-44.
    Deep ecologists have criticized reform environmentalists for not being sufficiently radical in their attempts to curb human exploitation of the nonhuman world. Ecofeminists, however, maintain that deep ecologists, too, are not sufficiently radical, for they have neglected the cmcial role played by patriarchalism in shaping the cultural categories responsible for Western humanity’s domination of Nature. According to eco-feminists, only by replacing those categories-including atomism, hierarchalism, dualism, and androcentrism - can humanity learn to dweIl in harmony with nonhuman beings. After reviewing (...)
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  24.  1
    [Book Review] Contesting Earth's Future, Radical Ecology and Postmodernity. [REVIEW]Michael E. Zimmerman - 1996 - Ethics 106 (3):650-653.
    Radical ecology typically brings to mind media images of ecological activists standing before loggers' saws, staging anti-nuclear marches, and confronting polluters on the high seas. Yet for more than twenty years, the activities of organizations such as the Greens and Earth First! have been influenced by a diverse, less-publicized group of radical ecological philosophers. It is their work—the philosophical underpinnings of the radical ecological movement—that is the subject of _Contesting Earth's Future_. The book offers a much-needed, balanced appraisal of radical (...)
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  25.  82
    The Singularity: A Crucial Phase in Divine Self-Actualization?Michael E. Zimmerman - 2008 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):347-370.
    Ray Kurzweil and others have posited that the confluence of nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, robotics, and genetic engineering will soon produce posthuman beings that will far surpass us in power and intelligence. Just as black holes constitute a ldquo;singularityrdquo; from which no information can escape, posthumans will constitute a ldquo;singularity:rdquo; whose aims and capacities lie beyond our ken. I argue that technological posthumanists, whether wittingly or unwittingly, draw upon the long-standing Christian discourse of ldquo;theosis,rdquo; according to which humans are capable of (...)
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  26. Feldman on the Nature and Value of Pleasure. [REVIEW]Michael J. Zimmerman - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (3):425 - 437.
  27. Last Man or Overman? Transhuman Appropriations of a Nietzschean Theme.Michael E. Zimmerman - 2011 - Hedgehog Review 13 (2):31-44.
    To what extent can Nietzsche's idea of the Overman be used in connection with transhumanist notions of highly advanced humans and even posthumans?
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  28.  50
    Sharing Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1985 - American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (2):115 - 122.
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  29.  1
    The Concept of Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):242-244.
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  30. The Immorality of Punishment.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    In _The Immorality of Punishment_ Michael Zimmerman argues forcefully that not only our current practice but indeed any practice of legal punishment is deeply morally repugnant, no matter how vile the behaviour that is its target. Despite the fact that it may be difficult to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws, Zimmerman makes a timely and compelling case for the view that we must seek and put into (...)
     
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  31.  28
    The Threat of Ecofascism.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1995 - Social Theory and Practice 21 (2):207-238.
  32.  64
    Responsibility and Awareness.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (4):248-261.
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  33.  10
    Toward a Heideggerean Ethos for Radical Environmentalism.E. Zimmerman Michael - 1983 - Environmental Ethics 5 (2):99-131.
    Recently several philosophers have argued that environmental reform movements cannot halt humankind’s destruction of the biosphere because they still operate within the anthropocentric humanism that forms the root of the ecological crisis. According to “radical” environmentalists, disaster can be averted only if we adopt a nonanthropocentric understanding of reality that teaches us to live harmoniouslyon the Earth. Martin Heidegger agrees that humanism leads human beings beyond their proper limits while forcing other beings beyond their limits as weIl. The doctrine of (...)
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  34. Eclipse of the Self: The Development of Heidegger's Concept of Authenticity.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (2):187-188.
     
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  35.  27
    Remote Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1987 - American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):199 - 205.
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  36.  23
    The Relevance of Risk to Wrongdoing.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2005 - In Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman. Ashgate.
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  37.  66
    Negligence and Moral Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1986 - Noûs 20 (2):199-218.
  38.  84
    Virtual Intrinsic Value and the Principle of Organic Unities.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):653 - 666.
    This paper argues that Moore's principle of organic unities is false. Advocates of the principle have failed to take note of the distinction between actual intrinsic value and virtual intrinsic value. Purported cases of organic unities, where the actual intrinsic value of a part of a whole is allegedly defeated by the actual intrinsic value of the whole itself, are more plausibly seen as cases where the part in question has no actual intrinsic value but instead a plurality of merely (...)
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  39.  30
    Taking Some of the Mystery Out of Omissions.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):541-554.
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  40.  59
    Another Plea for Excuses.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2004 - American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):259 - 266.
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  41.  44
    Where Did I Go Wrong?Michael J. Zimmerman - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 59 (1):55 - 77.
  42.  63
    Actions and Events.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Research 20:585-594.
    Kent Bach has argued that certain traditional problems of action theory (conceming the individuation of actions, their timing, their location, and the manner in which they enter into causal relations) arise only on the supposition that actions are events, and he has argued further that actions are not events. In this paper these arguments are examined and rejected.
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  43.  31
    Intervening Agents and Moral Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1985 - Philosophical Quarterly 35 (141):347-358.
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  44.  34
    Shifts in Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 14 (1):62-79.
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  45. Heidegger and Nietzsche on Authentic Time.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1977 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 4 (3):239-264.
  46.  4
    An Essay on Human Action.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1984 - P. Lang.
  47. The Eclipse of the Self: The Development of Heidegger's Concept of Authenticity.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (3):401-402.
     
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  48.  72
    Rethinking the Heidegger-Deep Ecology Relationship.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1993 - Environmental Ethics 15 (3):195-224.
    Recent disclosures regarding the relationship between Heidegger’s thought and his own version of National Socialism have led me to rethink my earlier efforts to portray Heidegger as a forerunner of deep ecology. His political problems have provided ammunition for critics, such as Murray Bookchin, who regard deep ecology as a reactionary movement. In this essay, I argue that, despite some similarities, Heidegger’s thought and deep ecology are in many ways incompatible, in part because deep ecologists—in spite of their criticism of (...)
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  49.  34
    Supererogation and Doing the Best One Can.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1993 - American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (4):373 - 380.
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  50.  30
    Subsidiary Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1986 - Philosophical Studies 50 (1):65 - 75.
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1 — 50 / 173