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  1. Using machine learning to predict decisions of the European Court of Human Rights.Masha Medvedeva, Michel Vols & Martijn Wieling - 2020 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (2):237-266.
    When courts started publishing judgements, big data analysis within the legal domain became possible. By taking data from the European Court of Human Rights as an example, we investigate how natural language processing tools can be used to analyse texts of the court proceedings in order to automatically predict judicial decisions. With an average accuracy of 75% in predicting the violation of 9 articles of the European Convention on Human Rights our approach highlights the potential of machine learning approaches in (...)
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    Using machine learning to predict decisions of the European Court of Human Rights.Masha Medvedeva, Michel Vols & Martijn Wieling - 2020 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (2):237-266.
    When courts started publishing judgements, big data analysis within the legal domain became possible. By taking data from the European Court of Human Rights as an example, we investigate how natural language processing tools can be used to analyse texts of the court proceedings in order to automatically predict judicial decisions. With an average accuracy of 75% in predicting the violation of 9 articles of the European Convention on Human Rights our approach highlights the potential of machine learning approaches in (...)
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    Rethinking the field of automatic prediction of court decisions.Masha Medvedeva, Martijn Wieling & Michel Vols - 2023 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 31 (1):195-212.
    In this paper, we discuss previous research in automatic prediction of court decisions. We define the difference between outcome identification, outcome-based judgement categorisation and outcome forecasting, and review how various studies fall into these categories. We discuss how important it is to understand the legal data that one works with in order to determine which task can be performed. Finally, we reflect on the needs of the legal discipline regarding the analysis of court judgements.
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    Predicting citations in Dutch case law with natural language processing.Iris Schepers, Masha Medvedeva, Michelle Bruijn, Martijn Wieling & Michel Vols - forthcoming - Artificial Intelligence and Law:1-31.
    With the ever-growing accessibility of case law online, it has become challenging to manually identify case law relevant to one’s legal issue. In the Netherlands, the planned increase in the online publication of case law is expected to exacerbate this challenge. In this paper, we tried to predict whether court decisions are cited by other courts or not after being published, thus in a way distinguishing between more and less authoritative cases. This type of system may be used to process (...)
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