33 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Michelle Greenwood [35]Michelle R. Greenwood [2]
  1.  21
    Reconnecting to the Social in Business Ethics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):1-4.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2. Stakeholder Engagement: Beyond the Myth of Corporate Responsibility.Michelle Greenwood - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):315-327.
    The purpose of this article is to transcend the assumption that stakeholder engagement is necessarily a responsible practice. Stakeholder engagement is traditionally seen as corporate responsibility in action. Indeed, in some literatures there exists an assumption that the more an organisation engages with its stakeholders, the more it is responsible. This simple 'more is better' view of stakeholder engagement belies the true complexity of the relationship between engagement and corporate responsibility. Stakeholder engagement may be understood in a variety of different (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  3.  31
    Focusing on Ethics and Broadening our Intellectual Base.Michelle Greenwood & R. Edward Freeman - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):1-3.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  4.  36
    Ethics at the Centre of Global and Local Challenges: Thoughts on the Future of Business Ethics.Steffen Böhm, Michal Carrington, Nelarine Cornelius, Boudewijn de Bruin, Michelle Greenwood, Louise Hassan, Tanusree Jain, Charlotte Karam, Arno Kourula, Laurence Romani, Suhaib Riaz & Deirdre Shaw - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (3):835-861.
    To commemorate 40 years since the founding of the Journal of Business Ethics, the editors in chief of the journal have invited the editors to provide commentaries on the future of business ethics. This essay comprises a selection of commentaries aimed at creating dialogue around the theme Ethics at the centre of global and local challenges. For much of the history of the Journal of Business Ethics, ethics was seen within the academy as a peripheral aspect of business. However, in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  21
    Deepening Ethical Analysis in Business Ethics.Michelle Greenwood & R. Edward Freeman - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  6.  10
    Trust and Stakeholder Theory: Trustworthiness in the Organisation–Stakeholder Relationship.Michelle Greenwood & Harry Buren Iii - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):425-438.
    Trust is a fundamental aspect of the moral treatment of stakeholders within the organization–stakeholder relationship. Stakeholders trust the organization to return benefit or protections from harm commensurate with their contributions or stakes. However, in many situations, the firm holds greater power than the stakeholder and therefore cannot necessarily be trusted to return the aforementioned duty to the stakeholder. Stakeholders must therefore rely on the trustworthiness of the organization to fulfill obligations in accordance to Phillips’ principle of fairness (Business Ethics Quarterly7(1), (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  7.  17
    Deepening Methods in Business Ethics.R. Edward Freeman & Michelle Greenwood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):1-3.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  11
    Deepening Methods in Business Ethics.R. Edward Freeman & Michelle Greenwood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  79
    Enhancing employee voice: Are voluntary employer–employee partnerships enough?Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  10.  44
    Ethics and HRM.Michelle Greenwood & R. Edward Freeman - 2011 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (3-4):269-292.
    The development of an ethical perspective of HRM that is both employee centered and explicitly normative and, as such, distinct from dominant and criticalperspectives of HRM has progressed in recent years. Reliance on the traditional “threesome” of rights/justice theories, deontology and consequentialism, however, has limited debate to micro-level issues and the search for a “solution.” By understanding the employment relationship as a stakeholder relationship, we open the ethical analysis of HRM to the pluralism and pragmatism that stakeholder theory has to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  11.  32
    The Importance of Stakeholders According to Business Leaders.Michelle Greenwood - 2001 - Business and Society Review 106 (1):29-49.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  12.  22
    Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough?Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  13.  26
    Ethics and HRM.Michelle Greenwood & R. Edward Freeman - 2011 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (3-4):269-292.
    The development of an ethical perspective of HRM that is both employee centered and explicitly normative and, as such, distinct from dominant and criticalperspectives of HRM has progressed in recent years. Reliance on the traditional “threesome” of rights/justice theories, deontology and consequentialism, however, has limited debate to micro-level issues and the search for a “solution.” By understanding the employment relationship as a stakeholder relationship, we open the ethical analysis of HRM to the pluralism and pragmatism that stakeholder theory has to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14.  33
    The Metrics of Ethics and the Ethics of Metrics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):1-5.
    Metrics shape our social worlds in many and more ways. Everyday quantifications of our preferences, our behaviors and our relationships, alter us and the institutions that we constitute. This essay takes a brief look at the metrics of business ethics through two analytic devices. Representation explains the notion that metrics can capture or demonstrate ethics and performativity explains the notion that metrics can shape or constitute ethics. The analytic distinction between representation and performativity is obscured in practice when metrics become (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  33
    Letter from the Incoming Editors.R. Edward Freeman & Michelle Greenwood - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):1-3.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16.  24
    Approving or Improving Research Ethics in Management Journals.Michelle Greenwood - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):507-520.
    Despite significant scholarly debate about knowledge production in the management discipline through the peer-review journal processes, there is minimal discussion about the ethical treatment of the research subject in these publication processes. In contrast, the ethical scrutiny of management research processes within research institutions is often highly formalized and very focused on the protection of research participants. Hence, the question arises of how management publication processes should best account for the interests of the research subject, both in the narrow sense (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17.  44
    Frontiers, Intersections and Engagements of Ethics and HRM.Gavin Jack, Michelle Greenwood & Jan Schapper - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):1-12.
    This essay, and the special issue it introduces, sets out to reignite ethical interrogations of the theory and practice of Human Resource Management (HRM). To cultivate greater levels of boundary-spanning debate about the ethics of HRM, we develop a framework of four tenors for scholarly work: the ethical-declarative, the ethical-subjunctive, the ethical-ethnographic, the ethical-systemic. Each of these tenors denotes particular grounds for ethical critique and encourages scholars to consider the subjects and objects of their enquiry, the disciplinary scope of their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18.  29
    The Genesis of Employment Ethics.Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):707-719.
    Given the growing interest in religion and spirituality in the community and workplace, we consider what light one of the oldest sources of human ethics, the Torah, can throw on the vexing issues of contemporary employment ethics and social sustainability. We specifically consider the Torah because it is the primary document of Judaism, the source of all the basic Biblical commandments, and a framework of ethics. A distinctive feature of Jewish ethics is its interpretive approach to moral philosophy: that is, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Stakeholder Theory and the Ethics of HRM.Michelle Greenwood & Helen De Cieri - 2007 - In Ashly Pinnington, Rob Macklin & Tom Campbell (eds.), Human Resource Management: Ethics and Employment. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20.  42
    Stakeholder Voice: A Problem, a Solution and a Challenge for Managers and Academics.Harry J. van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2009 - Philosophy of Management 8 (3):15-23.
    The 25th anniversary of R. Edward Freeman’s Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach provides an opportunity to consider where stakeholder theory has been, where it is going, and how it might influence the behavior of academics conducting stakeholder-oriented research. We propose that Freeman’s early work on the stakeholder concept supports the normative claim that a stakeholder’s contribution to value creation implies a right to stakeholder voice with regard to how a corporation makes decisions. Failure to account for stakeholder voice (especially for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Ethics and HRM Education.Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):1-15.
    Human resource management (HRM) education has tended to focus on specific functions and tasks within organizations, such as compensation, staffing, and evaluation. This task orientation within HRM education fails to account for the bigger questions facing human resource management and employment relationships, questions which address the roles and responsibilities of the HR function and HR practitioners. An educational focus on HRM that does not explicitly address larger ethical questions fails to equip students to address stakeholder concerns about how employees are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Ethics and HRM: A review and conceptual analysis. [REVIEW]Michelle R. Greenwood - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):261 - 278.
    This paper reviews and develops the ethical analysis of human resource management (HRM). Initially, the ethical perspective of HRM is differentiated from the "mainstrea" and critical perspectives of HRM. To date, the ethical analysis of HRM has taken one of two forms: the application Kantian and utilitarian ethical theories to the gestalt of HRM, and the application of theories of justice and fairness to specific HRM practices. This paper is concerned with the former, the ethical analysis of HRM in its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  23.  35
    A Stakeholder Approach to Ethical Human Resource Management.Michelle R. Greenwood & John Simmons - 2004 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):3-23.
  24.  20
    Stakeholder Voice: A Problem, a Solution and a Challenge for Managers and Academics.Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2009 - Philosophy of Management 8 (3):15-23.
    The 25th anniversary of R. Edward Freeman’s Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach provides an opportunity to consider where stakeholder theory has been, where it is going, and how it might influence the behavior of academics conducting stakeholder-oriented research. We propose that Freeman’s early work on the stakeholder concept supports the normative claim that a stakeholder’s contribution to value creation implies a right to stakeholder voice with regard to how a corporation makes decisions. Failure to account for stakeholder voice (especially for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Ethical Analyses of HRM: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW]Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):355-366.
    The very idea of human resource management raises ethical considerations: What does it mean to us as humans for human beings to be managed as resources? Intriguingly, the field of ethics and HRM remains underdeveloped. Current approaches to HRM fail to place ethical considerations as their central warrant. This article, building on Greenwood (J Bus Ethics 36(3):261–279, 2002), argues for a deeper analysis of ethical issues in HRM, indeed for a differentiated ethical perspective of HRM that sets normative deliberations as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  26.  51
    The study of business ethics: A case for dr seuss.Michelle Greenwood - 2000 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 9 (3):155–162.
    This paper provides an example of how narrative literature can be used to teach management ethics within management education. The place of narrative literature in the study of organisations generally is considered, and it is suggested that such material can provide non‐traditional cases for teaching purposes. Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax is chosen as an example of a story with which students can empathise. The ‘case’ is analysed using an ethical decision‐making framework. As part of this analysis a number of theoretically (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  13
    Intimate Partner Violence and Business: Exploring the Boundaries of Ethical Enquiry.Charlotte M. Karam, Michelle Greenwood, Laura Kauzlarich, Anne O’Leary Kelly & Tracy Wilcox - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 187 (4):645-655.
    In this article, we conceptualize the under investigated and under theorized relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and business responsibility. As an urgent social issue, IPV—understood as abuse of power within the context of an intimate partner relationship, mainly perpetrated by men and involving a pattern of behavior—has been studied for decades in many disciplines. A less common yet vital research perspective is to examine IPV as it relates to the business and to ask how organizations should engage with IPV. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  7
    Ethics and HRM Education.Harry J. van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):1-15.
  29.  18
    Ethical Research in Business Ethics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (1):1-5.
    In this editorial essay, we argue that business ethics research should be aware of the ethical implications of its own methodological choices, and that these implications include, but go beyond, mere compliance with standardized ethical norms. Methodological choices should be made specifically with reference to their effects on the world, both within and outside the academy. Awareness of these effects takes researchers beyond assuring ethics in their methods to more fully consider the ethics of their methods as knowledge practices that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  77
    Trust and Stakeholder Theory: Trustworthiness in the Organisation–Stakeholder Relationship. [REVIEW]Michelle Greenwood & I. I. I. Buren - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):425-438.
    Trust is a fundamental aspect of the moral treatment of stakeholders within the organization–stakeholder relationship. Stakeholders trust the organization to return benefit or protections from harm commensurate with their contributions or stakes. However, in many situations, the firm holds greater power than the stakeholder and therefore cannot necessarily be trusted to return the aforementioned duty to the stakeholder. Stakeholders must therefore rely on the trustworthiness of the organization to fulfill obligations in accordance to Phillips’ principle of fairness (Business Ethics Quarterly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  31.  14
    Stakeholder Voice: A Problem, a Solution and a Challenge for Managers and Academics.Michelle Greenwood & Harry J. Van Buren - 2009 - Philosophy of Management 8 (3):15-23.
    The 25th anniversary of R. Edward Freeman’s Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach provides an opportunity to consider where stakeholder theory has been, where it is going, and how it might influence the behavior of academics conducting stakeholder-oriented research. We propose that Freeman’s early work on the stakeholder concept supports the normative claim that a stakeholder’s contribution to value creation implies a right to stakeholder voice with regard to how a corporation makes decisions. Failure to account for stakeholder voice (especially for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  22
    Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? [REVIEW]Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  33.  22
    The study of business ethics: A case for Dr Seuss.Michelle Greenwood - 2000 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 9 (3):155-162.
    This paper provides an example of how narrative literature can be used to teach management ethics within management education. The place of narrative literature in the study of organisations generally is considered, and it is suggested that such material can provide non‐traditional cases for teaching purposes. Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax is chosen as an example of a story with which students can empathise. The ‘case’ is analysed using an ethical decision‐making framework. As part of this analysis a number of theoretically (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations