26 found
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  1.  49
    Repetition and Difference: Lefebvre, le Corbusier and Modernity's (Im)Moral Landscape.Mick Smith - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):31 – 44.
    If, as Lefebvre argues, every society produces its own social space, then modernity might be characterized by that (anti-)social and instrumental space epitomized and idealized in Le Corbusier's writings. This repetitively patterned space consumes and regulates the differences between places and people; it encapsulates a normalizing morality that seeks to reduce all differences to an economic order of the Same. Lefebvre's dialectical conceptualization of 'difference' can both help explain the operation of this (im)moral landscape and offer the possibility of alternative (...)
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  2.  21
    Against the Enclosure of the Ethical Commons: Radical Environmentalism as an “Ethics of Place”.Mick Smith - 1997 - Environmental Ethics 19 (4):339-353.
    Inspired by recent anti-roads protests in Britain, I attempt to articulate a radical environmental ethos and, at the same time, to produce a cogent moral analysis of the dialectic between environmental destruction and protection. In this analysis, voiced in terms of a spatial metaphoric, an “ethics of place,” I seek to subvert the hegemony of modernity’s formal systematization and codification of values whilestill conserving something of modernity’s critical heritage: to reconstitute ethics in order to counter the current enclosure of the (...)
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  3.  20
    Environmental Anamnesis: Walter Benjamin and the Ethics of Extinction.Mick Smith - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (4):359-376.
    Environmentalists often recount tales of recent extinctions in the form of an allegory of human moral failings. But such allegories install an instrumental relation to the past’s inhabitants, using them to carry moralistic messages. Taking the passenger pigeon as a case in point, I argue for a different, ethical relation to the past’s inhabitants that conserves something of the wonder and “strangeness of the Other.” What Walter Benjamin refers to as the “redemptive moment” sparks a recognition of the Other that (...)
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  4.  62
    Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference.Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  5.  47
    To Speak of Trees: Social Constructivism, Environmental Values, and the Future of Deep Ecology.Mick Smith - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (4):359-376.
    The power and the promise of deep ecology is seen, by its supporters and detractors alike, to lie in its claims to speak on behalf of a natural world threatened by human excesses. Yet, to speak of trees as trees or nature as something worthy of respect in itself has appeared increasingly difficult in the light of social constructivist accounts of “nature.” Deep ecology has been loath to take constructivism’s insightsseriously, retreating into forms of biological objectivism and reductionism. Yet, deep (...)
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  6.  26
    Environmental Risks and Ethical Responsibilities: Arendt, Beck, and the Politics of Acting Into Nature.Mick Smith - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (3):227-246.
    The question of environmental responsibility is addressed through comparisons between Hannah Arendt’s and Ulrich Beck’s accounts of the emergent and globally threatening risks associated with acting into nature. Both theorists have been extraordinarily influential in their respective fields but their insights, pointing toward the politicization of nature through human intervention, are rarely brought into conjunction. Important differences stem from Beck’s treatment of risks as systemic and unavoidable side effects of late modernity. Arendt, however, retains a more restrictive anthropogenic view of (...)
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  7.  15
    Shadow and Shade: The Ethopoietics of Enlightenment.Mick Smith - 2003 - Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (2):117 – 130.
    Modern Western thought and culture have envisaged their task in terms of a metaphorics, a metaphysics and a technics of 'enlightenment'. However, the ethical and environmental implications of this determination to dispel all shadows have become increasingly pernicious as modernity both extends and alters the conceptualization and employment of (a now artificial) light as a tool of discovery and control. Drawing on the work of Foucault and Benjamin amongst others, this paper seeks to illustrate, through a critical ethopoietics, the 'speculative (...)
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  8.  2
    Citizens, Denizens and the Res Publica: Environmental Ethics, Structures of Feeling and Political Expression.Mick Smith - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (2):145 - 162.
    Environmental ethics should be understood as a radical project that challenges the limits of contemporary ethical and political expression, a limit historically defined by the concept of the citizen. This dominant model of public being, frequently justified in terms of a formal or procedural rationally, facilitates an exclusionary ethos that fails to properly represent our concerns for the non-human world. It tends to regard emotionally mediated concerns for others as a source of irrational and subjective distortions in an otherwise rationally (...)
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  9.  6
    Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language of Difference.Joyce Davidson & Mick Smith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  10.  6
    Democracy and Global Warming.Mick Smith - 2003 - Contemporary Political Theory 2 (3):393-395.
  11.  7
    Rethinking the Communicative Turn.Mick Smith - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):215-216.
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  12.  15
    Worldly (in)Difference and Ecological Ethics: Iris Murdoch and Emmanuel Levinas.Mick Smith - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):23-41.
    The natural world’s myriad differences from human beings, and its apparent indifference to human purposes and ends, are often regarded as problems an environmental ethics must overcome. Perhaps, though, ecological ethics might instead be re-envisaged as a form of other-directed concern that responds to just this situation. That is, the recognition of worldly (in)difference might actually be regarded as a precondition for, and opening on, any contemporary ethics, whether human or ecological. What is more, the task of ethics might be (...)
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  13.  17
    Ethical Difference(S): A Response to Maycroft on le Corbusier and Lefebvre.Mick Smith - 2002 - Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (3):260 – 269.
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  14.  10
    Political Theory and the Ecological Challenge.Mick Smith - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):93-96.
  15.  5
    The Working Landscape.Mick Smith - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (1):97-100.
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  16.  10
    Avalanches and Snowballs a Reply to Arne Naess.Mick Smith - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):223-224.
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  17.  9
    Epharmosis.Mick Smith - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (4):385-404.
    Concerns for the more-than-human world are consistently marginalized by dominant forms of philosophical and political humanism, characterized here by their unquestioning acceptance of human sovereignty over the world. A genuinely ecological political philosophy needs post-humanist concepts to begin articulating alternative notions of “ecological communities” as ethical and political, and not just biological realities. Drawing upon Jean-Luc Nancy’s concept of community, epharmosis, a largely defunct term of art in early plant ecology, can be reappropriated to signify the creative ethical/political/ecological interrelations that (...)
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  18.  5
    Worldly (In)Difference and Ecological Ethics.Mick Smith - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):23-41.
    The natural world’s myriad differences from human beings, and its apparent indifference to human purposes and ends, are often regarded as problems an environmental ethics must overcome. Perhaps, though, ecological ethics might instead be re-envisaged as a form of other-directed concern that responds to just this situation. That is, the recognition of worldly (in)difference might actually be regarded as a precondition for, and opening on, any contemporary ethics, whether human or ecological. What is more, the task of ethics might be (...)
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  19.  9
    Hermeneutics and the Culture of Birds: The Environmental Allegory of 'Easter Island'.Mick Smith - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (1):21 – 38.
    It has become commonplace to interpret 'Easter Island' in terms of an environmental allegory, a Malthusian morality tale of the consequences of over-exploitation of limited natural resources. There are, however, ethical dangers in treating places and peoples allegorically, as moralized means (lessons) to satisfy others' edificatory ends. Allegory reductively appropriates the past, presenting a specific interpretation as 'given' (fixed) and exemplary, wrongly suggesting that meanings and morals, like islands, are there to be 'discovered' ready-formed. Gadamer's hermeneutics suggests an alternative understanding (...)
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  20.  5
    Cheney and the Myth of Postmodernism.Mick Smith - 1993 - Environmental Ethics 15 (1):3-17.
    I draw critical parallels between Jim Cheney’s work and various aspects of modernism, which he ignores or misrepresents. I argue, first, that Cheney’s history of ideas is appallingly crude. He amalgamates all past Western philosophical traditions, irrespective of their disparate backgrounds and complex interrelationships, under the single heading, modern. Then he posits a radical epistemological break between a deluded modernism—characterized as foundationalist, essentialist, colonizing, and totalizing—and a contextual postmodernism. He seems unaware both of the complex genealogy of postmodernism and of (...)
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  21.  3
    Andrew Biro, Ed.: Critical Ecologies: The Frankfurt School and Contemporary Environmental Crisis.Mick Smith - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (2):247-250.
  22.  2
    &Lsquo; It Makes My Skin Crawl... &Rsquo;: The Embodiment of Disgust in Phobias of ‘ Nature&Rsquo’.Mick Smith & Joyce Davidson - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (1).
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  23.  1
    'It Makes My Skin Crawl...': The Embodiment of Disgust in Phobias of 'Nature'.Mick Smith & Joyce Davidson - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (1):43-67.
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  24. New Perspectives on Anarchism.Samantha E. Bankston, Harold Barclay, Lewis Call, Alexandre J. M. E. Christoyannopoulos, Vernon Cisney, Jesse Cohn, Abraham DeLeon, Francis Dupuis-Déri, Benjamin Franks, Clive Gabay, Karen Goaman, Rodrigo Gomes Guimarães, Uri Gordon, James Horrox, Anthony Ince, Sandra Jeppesen, Stavros Karageorgakis, Elizabeth Kolovou, Thomas Martin, Todd May, Nicolae Morar, Irène Pereira, Stevphen Shukaitis, Mick Smith, Scott Turner, Salvo Vaccaro, Mitchell Verter, Dana Ward & Dana M. Williams - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    The study of anarchism as a philosophical, political, and social movement has burgeoned both in the academy and in the global activist community in recent years. Taking advantage of this boom in anarchist scholarship, Nathan J. Jun and Shane Wahl have compiled twenty-six cutting-edge essays on this timely topic in New Perspectives on Anarchism.
     
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  25. Damian F. White, Bookchin: A Critical Appraisal.Mick Smith - 2009 - Radical Philosophy 156:53.
     
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  26.  3
    Edward Hyams: Ecology and Politics 'Under the Vine'.Mick Smith - 2011 - Environmental Values 20 (1):95-119.
    This paper offers an assessment of the agricultural eco-politics of Edward Hyams, novelist, gardener, historian, broadcaster and anarchist. It focuses in particular on his collaboration with the conservative writer on rural England, and founding member of the Soil Association, H.J. Massingham which resulted in a book, Prophecy of Famine — a fundamental critique of the effects of industrial capitalism on farming and a call for agricultural self-sufficiency and soil conservation. This collaboration between two writers with very different political views raises (...)
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