Results for 'Mike Bull'

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  1.  29
    Towards an Appreciation of Ethics in Social Enterprise Business Models.Mike Bull & Rory Ridley-Duff - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (3):619-634.
    How can a critical analysis of entrepreneurial intention inform an appreciation of ethics in social enterprise business models? In answering this question, we consider the ethical commitments that inform entrepreneurial action and the hybrid organisations that emerge out of these commitments and actions. Ethical theory can be a useful way to reorient the field of social enterprise so that it is more critical of bureaucratic and market-driven enterprises connected to neoliberal doctrine. Social enterprise hybrid business models are therefore reframed as (...)
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  2.  58
    Dual processes, probabilities, and cognitive architecture.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (1):15-26.
    It has been argued that dual process theories are not consistent with Oaksford and Chater’s probabilistic approach to human reasoning (Oaksford and Chater in Psychol Rev 101:608–631, 1994 , 2007 ; Oaksford et al. 2000 ), which has been characterised as a “single-level probabilistic treatment[s]” (Evans 2007 ). In this paper, it is argued that this characterisation conflates levels of computational explanation. The probabilistic approach is a computational level theory which is consistent with theories of general cognitive architecture that invoke (...)
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  3. The anarchical society: a study of order in World politics.Hedley Bull - 2012 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    Introduction -- Part 1. The nature of order in world politics: the concept of order in world politics; does order exist in world politics?; how is order maintained in world politics?; order versus justice in world politics -- Part 2. Order in the contemporary international system: the balance of power and international order; international law and international order; diplomacy and international order; war and international order; the great powers and international order -- Part 3. Alternative paths to world order: alternatives (...)
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  4.  41
    The ethics of educational management: personal, social, and political perspectives on school organization.Mike Bottery - 1992 - New York: Cassell.
  5. 13 Mike Kelley.Mike Kelley - 2007 - In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: key contemporary thinkers. New York: Berg. pp. 13.
     
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  6.  41
    Toward an Ethics of Algorithms: Convening, Observation, Probability, and Timeliness.Mike Ananny - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (1):93-117.
    Part of understanding the meaning and power of algorithms means asking what new demands they might make of ethical frameworks, and how they might be held accountable to ethical standards. I develop a definition of networked information algorithms as assemblages of institutionally situated code, practices, and norms with the power to create, sustain, and signify relationships among people and data through minimally observable, semiautonomous action. Starting from Merrill’s prompt to see ethics as the study of “what we ought to do,” (...)
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  7.  8
    Science or society?: the politics of the work of scientists.Mike Hales - 1982 - London: Pan Books in conjunction with Channel Four Television Co..
  8. Science–policy research collaborations need philosophers.Mike D. Schneider, Temitope O. Sogbanmu, Hannah Rubin, Alejandro Bortolus, Emelda E. Chukwu, Remco Heesen, Chad L. Hewitt, Ricardo Kaufer, Hanna Metzen, Veli Mitova, Anne Schwenkenbecher, Evangelina Schwindt, Helena Slanickova, Katie Woolaston & Li-an Yu - 2024 - Nature Human Behaviour.
    Wicked problems’ are tricky to solve because of their many interconnected components and a lack of any single optimal solution. At the science–policy interface, all problems can look wicked: research exposes the complexity that is relevant to designing, executing and implementing policy fit for ambitious human needs. Expertise in philosophical research can help to navigate that complexity.
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  9.  12
    A General Interpreted Modal Calculus.R. A. Bull - 1974 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 39 (2):352-352.
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  10.  3
    Nietzsche's negative ecologies.Malcolm Bull - 2009 - Berkeley: Townsend Center for the Humanities, University of California Press. Edited by Anthony J. Cascardi & T. J. Clark.
    Malcolm Bull offers a detailed analysis of nihilism in Nietzsche's works. Along with accompanying commentaries by Cascardi and Clark, he explores the significance of Nietzscheís views given the fact that a wide range of readers have come to embrace his ideas as new orthodoxy. There seem to be no anti-Nietzscheans today, but Bull demonstrates that this wide embrace of Nietzsche runs counter to the very meaning of nihilism as Nietzsche understood it.
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  11.  10
    An Introduction to Modal Logic.R. A. Bull - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):328-328.
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  12. Locke's Answer to Molyneux's Thought Experiment.Mike Bruno & Eric Mandelbaum - 2010 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (2):165-80.
    Philosophical discussions of Molyneux's problem within contemporary philosophy of mind tend to characterize the problem as primarily concerned with the role innately known principles, amodal spatial concepts, and rational cognitive faculties play in our perceptual lives. Indeed, for broadly similar reasons, rationalists have generally advocated an affirmative answer, while empiricists have generally advocated a negative one, to the question Molyneux posed after presenting his famous thought experiment. This historical characterization of the dialectic, however, somewhat obscures the role Molyneux's problem has (...)
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  13.  21
    The ‘Social Life of Methods’: A Critical Introduction.Mike Savage - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (4):3-21.
    This paper explores the distinctive features of the critical agenda associated with the ‘Social Life of Methods’. I argue that although this perspective can be associated with the increasing interest, often associated with scholars in Science and Technology Studies, to reflect on how methods can become objects of inquiry, it also needs to be rooted in the current crisis of positivist methods. I identify the challenge for positivism in terms of the decreasing ability of its procedures to effectively organize increasingly (...)
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  14.  46
    Mike Boone, Kathleen Fite, & Robert F. Reardon 43.Mike Boone - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  15. Evil is not Evidence.Mike Almeida - 2022 - Religious Studies 1 (1):1-9.
    The paper aims to show that, if S5 is the logic of metaphysical necessity, then no state of affairs in any possible world constitutes any non-trivial evidence for or against the existence of the traditional God. There might well be states of affairs in some worlds describing extraordinary goods and extraordinary evils, but it is false that these states of affairs constitute any (non-trivial) evidence for or against the existence of God. The epistemological and metaphysical consequences for philosophical theology of (...)
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  16.  16
    Your subconscious brain can change your life: overcome obstacles, heal your body, and reach any goal with a revolutionary technique.Mike Dow - 2019 - Carlsbad, California: Hay House.
    New York Times best-selling author offers a groundbreaking approach to activate the subconscious brain to set yourself free from your past and create a terrific future. Can you remember a time in your life when you felt absolutely confident, happy, and free? Imagine what your life would be like if you could live in that space... In this book, Dr. Mike Dow shares a groundbreaking, life-changing program he created: Subconscious Visualization Technique (SVT). Now, if you think the subconscious brain (...)
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  17. Lucky Libertarianism.Mike Almeida & M. Bernstein - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 113 (2):93-119.
    Perhaps the greatest impediment to a viable libertarianism is the provision of a satisfactory explanation of how actions that are undetermined by an agent's character can still be under the control of, or ‘up to’, the agent. The ‘luck problem’ has been most assiduously examined by Robert Kane who supplies a detailed account of how this problem can be resolved. Although Kane's theory is innovative, insightful, and more resourceful than most of his critics believe, it ultimately cannot account for the (...)
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  18.  9
    Purity, spectra and localisation.Mike Prest - 2009 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The central aim of this book is to understand modules and the categories they form through associated structures and dimensions, which reflect the complexity of these, and similar, categories.
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  19.  16
    Modal Logic and Classical Logic.R. A. Bull - 1987 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (2):557-558.
  20. Primary literature.Mike Game - 2007 - In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: key contemporary thinkers. New York: Berg. pp. 159.
     
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  21. its power is founded on'a kind of structural analysis of the poetics of ritual'(LC, p. 1 1 9).Mike Kelley, Catholic Tastes & Day is Done - 2007 - In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: key contemporary thinkers. New York: Berg.
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  22.  9
    Plato’s Cratylus: Proceedings of the Eleventh Symposium Platonicum Pragense.Vladimír Mikeš (ed.) - 2021 - Boston: BRILL.
    The first collective monograph on one of Plato’s most intriguing dialogues with interest for readers of ancient philosophy as well as those who study modern theories of language.
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  23. Anthropomorphism as Cognitive Bias.Mike Dacey - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1152-1164.
    Philosophers and psychologists have long worried that the human tendency to anthropomorphize leads us to err in our understanding of nonhuman minds. This tendency, which I call intuitive anthropomorphism, is a heuristic used by our unconscious folk psychology to understand nonhuman animals. The dominant understanding of intuitive anthropomorphism underestimates its complexity. If we want to understand and control intuitive anthropomorphism, we must treat it as a cognitive bias and look to the empirical evidence. This evidence suggests that the most common (...)
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  24.  39
    Jean Baudrillard: in radical uncertainty.Mike Gane (ed.) - 2000 - Sterling, Va.: Pluto Press.
    Presents Baudrillard’s key concepts and examines his contribution to the analysis of specific domains, such as postmodernism, feminism, technology, art, war, ...
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  25.  56
    The Varieties of Parsimony in Psychology.Mike Dacey - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (4):414-437.
    Philosophers and psychologists make many different, seemingly incompatible parsimony claims in support of competing models of cognition in nonhuman animals. This variety of parsimony claims is problematic. Firstly, it is difficult to justify each specific variety. This problem is especially salient for Morgan's Canon, perhaps the most important variety of parsimony claimed. Secondly, there is no systematic way of adjudicating between particular claims when they conflict. I argue for a view of parsimony in comparative psychology that solves these problems, based (...)
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  26.  35
    Mediated characters: Multimodal viewpoint construction in comics.Borkent Mike - 2017 - Cognitive Linguistics 28 (3):539-563.
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  27.  74
    Rethinking associations in psychology.Mike Dacey - 2016 - Synthese 193 (12):3763-3786.
    I challenge the dominant understanding of what it means to say two thoughts are associated. The two views that dominate the current literature treat association as a kind of mechanism that drives sequences of thought. The first, which I call reductive associationism, treats association as a kind of neural mechanism. The second treats association as a feature of the kind of psychological mechanism associative processing. Both of these views are inadequate. I argue that association should instead be seen as a (...)
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  28.  15
    Media coverage of education.Mike Baker - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (3):286-297.
    The middle-market tabloid newspapers in Britain help to shape a perception of teachers and state schools that is mostly negative and derisory. This article provides examples of this bias in newspaper reportage based on a case study of an annual teacher union conference and journalists' different interpretations of events generally.
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  29.  80
    Bayesian Rationality: The Probabilistic Approach to Human Reasoning.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Are people rational? This question was central to Greek thought and has been at the heart of psychology and philosophy for millennia. This book provides a radical and controversial reappraisal of conventional wisdom in the psychology of reasoning, proposing that the Western conception of the mind as a logical system is flawed at the very outset. It argues that cognition should be understood in terms of probability theory, the calculus of uncertain reasoning, rather than in terms of logic, the calculus (...)
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  30. Beside the Standpoint.Mike Gane - 1996 - In Sue Wilkinson & Celia Kitzinger (eds.), Representing the other: a Feminism & psychology reader. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications. pp. 156.
     
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  31.  70
    Conservative AI and social inequality: conceptualizing alternatives to bias through social theory.Mike Zajko - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (3):1047-1056.
    In response to calls for greater interdisciplinary involvement from the social sciences and humanities in the development, governance, and study of artificial intelligence systems, this paper presents one sociologist’s view on the problem of algorithmic bias and the reproduction of societal bias. Discussions of bias in AI cover much of the same conceptual terrain that sociologists studying inequality have long understood using more specific terms and theories. Concerns over reproducing societal bias should be informed by an understanding of the ways (...)
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  32.  35
    A modal extension of intuitionist logic.R. A. Bull - 1965 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 6 (2):142-146.
  33.  36
    Corporate Philanthropy and Risk Management: An Investigation of Reinsurance and Charitable Giving in Insurance Firms.Mike Adams, Stefan Hoejmose & Zafeira Kastrinaki - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (1):1-37.
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  34.  33
    metaSEM: an R package for meta-analysis using structural equation modeling.Mike W.-L. Cheung - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  35. Five problems for the moral consensus about sins.Mike Ashfield - 2021 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 90 (3):157-189.
    A number of Christian theologians and philosophers have been critical of overly moralizing approaches to the doctrine of sin, but nearly all Christian thinkers maintain that moral fault is necessary or sufficient for sin to obtain. Call this the “Moral Consensus.” I begin by clarifying the relevance of impurities to the biblical cataloguing of sins. I then present four extensional problems for the Moral Consensus on sin, based on the biblical catalogue of sins: (1) moral over-demandingness, (2) agential unfairness, (3) (...)
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  36.  30
    A Case Study in the Relationship of Mind to Body: Transforming the Embodied Mind.Mike Ball - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (3):391-407.
    This paper employs ethnographic research methods to study a Buddhist meditation practice that takes the walking body as its object. The mundane act of walking is transformed into a meditative object for the purpose of refining states of embodied consciousness. This meditation practice offers a glimpse of the relationship of body to mind, a fundamental concern within the philosophy of mind. The analytic focus of this paper is the practical nature of meditation work. Aspects of Buddhist Philosophy are explored and (...)
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  37. ""Parental Consent Laws: Are They a" Reasonable Compromise"?Mike Males - 1994 - In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with contradictions: controversies in feminist social ethics. Boulder: Westview Press. pp. 287--290.
  38. Connectionist modelling in psychology: A localist manifesto.Mike Page - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):443-467.
    Over the last decade, fully distributed models have become dominant in connectionist psychological modelling, whereas the virtues of localist models have been underestimated. This target article illustrates some of the benefits of localist modelling. Localist models are characterized by the presence of localist representations rather than the absence of distributed representations. A generalized localist model is proposed that exhibits many of the properties of fully distributed models. It can be applied to a number of problems that are difficult for fully (...)
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  39. Transforming the mind a study in meditation practice.Mike Ball - 2000 - Communication and Cognition. Monographies 33 (1-2):121-140.
  40. Working with objects, images & symbols.Mike Ball - 2005 - Communication and Cognition. Monographies 38 (3-4):197-200.
     
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  41. Niels Bohr.Mike Barnett - 1986 - In Les Levidow (ed.), Science as politics. London: Free Association Books.
  42.  71
    The Trouper Syndrome: A Train Wreck Waiting to Happen.Mike Dillon - 2014 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (4):275-277.
    Volume 29, Issue 4, October-December, Page 275-277.
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  43.  57
    Associationism without associative links: Thomas Brown and the associationist project.Mike Dacey - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54 (C):31-40.
    There are two roles that association played in 18th–19th century associationism. The first dominates modern understanding of the history of the concept: association is a causal link posited to explain why ideas come in the sequence they do. The second has been ignored: association is merely regularity in the trains of thought, and the target of explanation. The view of association as regularity arose in several forms throughout the tradition, but Thomas Brown (1778–1820) makes the distinction explicit. He argues that (...)
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  44. Intelligibility is Necessary for Scientific Explanation, but Accuracy May Not Be.Mike Braverman, John Clevenger, Ian Harmon, Andrew Higgins, Zachary Horne, Joseph Spino & Jonathan Waskan - 2012 - In Naomi Miyake, David Peebles & Richard Cooper (eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
    Many philosophers of science believe that empirical psychology can contribute little to the philosophical investigation of explanations. They take this to be shown by the fact that certain explanations fail to elicit any relevant psychological events (e.g., familiarity, insight, intelligibility, etc.). We report results from a study suggesting that, at least among those with extensive science training, a capacity to render an event intelligible is considered a requirement for explanation. We also investigate for whom explanations must be capable of rendering (...)
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  45.  15
    Chloe Harrison, Louise Nuttall, Peter Stockwell and Wenjuan Yuan . Cognitive Grammar in Literature.Mike Borkent - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (3):571-582.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  46.  15
    The shared project, but divergent views, of the Empiricist associationists.Mike Dacey - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (4):759-781.
    Despite its long period of dominance, the details of associationism as developed by the British Empiricists in the 18th and 19th centuries are often ignored or forgotten today. Perhaps as a result, modern understandings of Empiricist associationism are often oversimplified. In fact, there is no single core view that can be viewed as definitional, or even weaker, as characteristic, of the tradition. The actual views of associationists in this tradition are much more diverse than any such view would allow, even (...)
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  47. Disagreement.Mike Ridge - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):41-63.
    Disagreement holds the key: the possibility of agreeing or disagreeing with a state of mind makes that state of mind act logically like accepting a claim. Charles Stevenson was quite right to begin his presentation of emotivism with disagreement.—Allan Gibbard.
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  48. Thinking space.Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    Thinking Space is ideal reading for those looking to learn about the Ospatial turn1 in social and cultural theory. As theorists have begun using using geographical concepts and metaphors to think about the complex and differentiated world this book examines the way they use spatial ideas, what role these ideas play in their thinking and what this means for how we think about theory and space. Among the writers discussed are: Simmel, Bakhtin, Deleuze, Cixous, Lefebvre, Lacan, Bourdieu, Foucault and Fanon.
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  49. Necessity, Theism, and Evidence.Mike Almeida - 2022 - Logique Et Analyse 259 (1):287-307.
    The minimal God exemplifies essential omnipotence, omniscience, and moral perfection, but none of the other properties of the traditional God. I examine the consequences of the minimal God in augmented S5, S4, and Kρσ. The metaphysical consequences for the minimal God in S5 include the impossibility that God—or any other object—might acquire, lose, or exchange an essential property. It is impossible that an essentially divine being might become essentially human, for instance. The epistemological consequences include the impossibility of agnosticism—it is (...)
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  50. Reevaluating the Dead Donor Rule.Mike Collins - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):1-26.
    The dead donor rule justifies current practice in organ procurement for transplantation and states that organ donors must be dead prior to donation. The majority of organ donors are diagnosed as having suffered brain death and hence are declared dead by neurological criteria. However, a significant amount of unrest in both the philosophical and the medical literature has surfaced since this practice began forty years ago. I argue that, first, declaring death by neurological criteria is both unreliable and unjustified but (...)
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