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  1.  17
    Cosmopolitan Climates.Mike Hulme - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (2-3):267-276.
    This essay argues for the fruitfulness of Beck’s idea of cosmopolitanism for understanding the changing political, sociological and psychological attributes of climate change. This argument is illustrated through brief examinations of how climate change is contributing to the dissolution of three modern dualisms: nature-culture, present-future and global-local. Not only does the cosmopolitan perspective help to understand the ways in which science and society are mutually constructing the phenomenon of climate change, it also offers us a way of asking ‘what can (...)
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  2.  67
    Disagreeing About Climate Change: Which Way Forward?Mike Hulme - 2015 - Zygon 50 (4):893-905.
    Why does climate change continue to be a forceful idea which divides people? What does this tell us about science, about culture, and about the future? Despite disagreement, how might the idea of climate change nevertheless be used creatively? In this essay I develop my investigation of these questions using four lines of argument. First, the future risks associated with human-caused climate change are severely underdetermined by science. Scientific predictions of future climates are poorly constrained; even more so the consequences (...)
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  3.  17
    Calculating the Incalculable: Is SAI the Lesser of Two Evils?Mike Hulme - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (4):507-512.
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    Chapter Twenty-Three. Four Meanings of Climate Change.Mike Hulme - 2014 - In Jesper Garsdal & Johanna Seibt (eds.), How is Global Dialogue Possible?: Foundational Reseach on Value Conflicts and Perspectives for Global Policy. De Gruyter. pp. 505-522.
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  5.  40
    Modelling and the Nation: Institutionalising Climate Prediction in the UK, 1988–92.Martin Mahony & Mike Hulme - 2016 - Minerva 54 (4):445-470.
    How climate models came to gain and exercise epistemic authority has been a key concern of recent climate change historiography. Using newly released archival materials and recently conducted interviews with key actors, we reconstruct negotiations between UK climate scientists and policymakers which led to the opening of the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research in 1990. We historicize earlier arguments about the unique institutional culture of the Hadley Centre, and link this culture to broader characteristics of UK regulatory practice (...)
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