Order:
  1.  6
    Alliance Network Centrality, Board Composition, and Corporate Social Performance.Craig D. Macaulay, Orlando C. Richard, Mike W. Peng & Maria Hasenhuttl - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):997-1008.
    What critical characteristics do firms have that determine the scale and scope of corporate social responsibility activities they undertake? This paper examines two disparate predictors of corporate social performance. First, using the lens of the resource-based view, we examine the role of alliance network centrality on corporate social performance. We find that centrality enhances corporate social performance. Second, we investigate how board composition affects corporate social performance. Specifically, drawing on stakeholder theory, we find that the percentage of female directors predicts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  18
    The Signaling Effect of Corporate Social Responsibility in Emerging Economies.Weichieh Su, Mike W. Peng, Weiqiang Tan & Yan-Leung Cheung - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):479-491.
    What signals do firms in emerging economies send to stakeholders when they adopt corporate social responsibility practices? We argue that in emerging economies, firms that adopt CSR practices positively signal investors that their firms have superior capabilities for filling institutional voids. From an institution-based view, we hypothesize that the institutional environment moderates the signaling effect of CSR on a firm’s financial performance. Based on a sample of firms from ten Asian emerging economies, we find a positive relationship between CSR practices (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  3
    She’-E-O Compensation Gap: A Role Congruity View.Joyce C. Wang, Lívia Markóczy, Sunny Li Sun & Mike W. Peng - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    Is there a compensation gap between female CEOs and male CEOs? If so, are there mechanisms to mitigate the compensation gap? Extending role congruity theory, we argue that the perception mismatch between the female gender role and the leadership role may lead to lower compensation to female CEOs, resulting in a gender compensation gap. Nevertheless, the compensation gap may be narrowed if female CEOs display agentic traits through risk-taking, or alternatively, work in female-dominated industries where communal traits are valued. Additionally, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation