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  1. What is an Attributive Adjective?Miles Rind & Lauren Tillinghast - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (1):77-88.
    Peter Geach’s distinction between logically predicative and logically attributive adjectives has gained a certain currency in philosophy. For all that, no satisfactory explanation of what an attributive adjective is has yet been provided. We argue that Geach’s discussion suggests two different ways of understanding the notion. According to one, an adjective is attributive just in case predications of it in combination with a noun fail to behave in inferences like a logical conjunction of two separate predications. According to the other, (...)
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  2. Kant's Beautiful Roses: A Response to Cohen's ‘Second Problem’.Miles Rind - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):65-74.
    According to Kant, the singular judgement ‘This rose is beautiful’ is, or may be, aesthetic, while the general judgement ‘Roses in general are beautiful’ is not. What, then, is the logical relation between the two judgements? I argue that there is none, and that one cannot allow there to be any if one agrees with Kant that the judgement ‘This rose is beautiful’ cannot be made on the basis of testimony. The appearance of a logical relation between the two judgements (...)
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  3. The Concept of Disinterestedness in Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics.Miles Rind - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):67-87.
    British writers of the eighteenth century such as Shaftesbury and Hutcheson are widely thought to have used the notion of disinterestedness to distinguish an aesthetic mode of perception from all other kinds. This historical view originates in the work of Jerome Stolnitz. Through a re-examination of the texts cited by Stolnitz, I argue that none of the writers in question possessed the notion of disinterestedness that has been used in later aesthetic theory, but only the ordinary, non-technical concept, and that (...)
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  4. What is Claimed in a Kantian Judgment of Taste?Miles Rind - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):63-85.
    Against interpretations of Kant that would assimilate the universality claim in judgments of taste either to moral demands or to theoretical assertions, I argue that it is for Kant a normative requirement shared with ordinary empirical judgments. This raises the question of why the universal agreement required by a judgment of taste should consist in the sharing of a feeling, rather than simply in the sharing of a thought. Kant’s answer is that in a judgment of taste, a feeling assumes (...)
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  5. Can Kants Deduction of Judgments of Taste Be Saved?Miles Rind - 2002 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (1):20-45.
    Kant’s argument in § 38 of the *Critique of Judgment* is subject to a dilemma: if the subjective condition of cognition is the sufficient condition of the pleasure of taste, then every object of experience must produce that pleasure; if not, then the universal communicability of cognition does not entail the universal communicability of the pleasure. Kant’s use of an additional premise in § 21 may get him out of this difficulty, but the premises themselves hang in the air and (...)
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    Review of Paul Crowther, The Kantian Aesthetic: From Knowledge to the Avant-Garde[REVIEW]Miles Rind - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (12).
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    Critique of the Power of Judgment (Review).Miles Rind - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):594-596.
  8. An Introduction to Kant's Aesthetics: Core Concepts and Problems: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Miles Rind - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):105-106.
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  9. Kant and the Problem of Judgments of Taste.Miles Rind - 1998 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    Kant holds that when we judge a thing beautiful, we do so from no other basis than our pleasure in the contemplation of the object, while at the same time, we presume to judge with validity for everyone. To explain how this is possible is the task of what he calls the critique of taste. I distinguish among three kinds of explanation that Kant offers. One is a theoretical account of the mental state from which judgments of taste supposedly arise--what (...)
     
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  10. The Trouble with Kant's Déduction of Judgments of Taste.Miles Rind - 2001 - In Ralph Schumacher, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Volker Gerhardt (eds.), Kant Und Die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des Ix. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Bd. I: Hauptvorträge. Bd. Ii: Sektionen I-V. Bd. Iii: Sektionen Vi-X: Bd. Iv: Sektionen Xi-Xiv. Bd. V: Sektionen Xv-Xviii. De Gruyter. pp. 462-467.
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