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  1.  89
    Humanoid Robots as “The Cultural Other”: Are We Able to Love Our Creations? [REVIEW]Min-Sun Kim & Eun-Joo Kim - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (3):309-318.
    Robot enthusiasts envision robots will become a “race unto themselves” as they cohabit with the humankind one day. Profound questions arise surrounding one of the major areas of research in the contemporary world—that concerning artificial intelligence. Fascination and anxiety that androids impose upon us hinges on how we come to conceive of the “Cultural Other.” Applying the notion of the “other” in multicultural research process, we will explore how the “Other” has been used to illustrate values and theories about robots, (...)
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  2.  7
    Robot as the “Mechanical Other”: Transcending Karmic Dilemma.Min-Sun Kim - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    As the artificial intelligence of computers grows ever-more sophisticated and continues to surpass the capacities of human minds in many ways, people are forced to question alleged ontological categories that separate humans from machines. As we are entering the world which is populated by non-enhanced and enhanced humans, cyborgs, robots, androids, avatars, and clones among them, the desire for evolutionary mastery of the natural world has taken on the two main directions: merging with machines in disembodied forms or embodied forms. (...)
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  3.  14
    Humans and Humanoid Social Robots in Communication Contexts.Min-Sun Kim, Jennifer Sur & Li Gong - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (4):317-325.
    As humanoid social robots are developed rapidly in recent years and experimented in social situations, comparing them to humans provides insights into practical as well as philosophical concerns. This study uses the theoretical framework of communication constraints, derived in human–human communication research, to compare whether people apply social-oriented constraints and task-oriented constraints differently to human targets versus humanoid social robot targets. A total of 230 students from the University of Hawaii at Manoa participated in the study. The participants completed a (...)
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  4.  18
    The Effects of Multiculturalism and Mechanistic Disdain for Robots in Human-to-Robot Communication Scenarios.Hyun-Hee Heo & Min-Sun Kim - 2013 - Interaction Studies 14 (1):81-106.
    This study investigates the effects of cultural orientation and the degree of disdain for robots on the preferred conversational styles in human-to-robot interactions. 203 participants self-reported on questionnaires through a computer-based online survey. The two requesting situations were intended to simulate the participants' interactions with humanoid social robots through an Internet video-phone medium of communication. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the mediating role of mechanistic disdain between multicultural orientation and conversational constraints. The findings reveal that between the two (...)
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    The Effects of Multiculturalism and Mechanistic Disdain for Robots in Human-to-Robot Communication Scenarios.Hyun-Hee Heo & Min-Sun Kim - 2013 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (1):81-106.
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  6. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan.Satoshi Akutsu, Ayano Yamaguchi, Min-Sun Kim & Atsushi Oshio - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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