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  1.  24
    Echoes of Corporate Social Responsibility: How and When Does CSR Influence Employees’ Promotive and Prohibitive Voices?Juan Wang, Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (2):253-269.
    In this study, we examine whether, how, and when corporate social responsibility increases promotive and prohibitive voices in accordance with ethical climate theory and multi-experience model of ethical climate. Data from 382 employees at two time points are examined. Results show that CSR is positively related to promotive and prohibitive voices. Other-focused and self-focused climates mediate the relationship between CSR and the two types of voice. Moreover, humble leadership moderates the positive relationship between CSR and other-focused climate. Such leadership moderates (...)
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  2.  58
    Critical Mass of Women on BODs, Multiple Identities, and Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):303-317.
    Although previous studies focus on the role of women in the boardroom and corporate response to natural disasters, none evaluate how women directors influence corporate philanthropic disaster response (CPDR). This study collects data on the philanthropic responses of privately owned Chinese firms to the Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008, and the Yushu earthquake of April 14, 2010. We find that when at least three women serve on a board of directors (BOD), their companies’ responses to natural disasters are more (...)
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  3.  20
    Their Pain, Our Pleasure: How and When Peer Abusive Supervision Leads to Third Parties’ Schadenfreude and Work Engagement.Yueqiao Qiao, Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):695-711.
    Abusive supervision negatively affects its direct victims. However, recent studies have begun to explore how abusive supervision affects third parties. We use the emotion-based process model of schadenfreude as a basis to suggest that third parties will experience schadenfreude and increase their work engagement as a response to peer abusive supervision. Furthermore, we suggest that the context of competitive goal interdependence facilitates the indirect relationship between PAS and third parties’ work engagement on schadenfreude. We use a mixed-method approach to test (...)
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  4.  10
    The Role of Corporate Donations in Chinese Political Markets.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):519-545.
    Many corporations actively engage in political activities to enhance their relationships with politicians, facilitating access to scarce resources and creating competitive advantages. We investigate corporate donations to explore how they initiate interactions between firms and new local leaders in China. Specifically, we propose that political turnover creates unique opportunities for firms to win over new officials via corporate donations, especially in competitive markets. Moreover, we find that firms that make generous donations at the beginning of a new city secretary’s tenure (...)
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  5.  12
    Echoes of CEO Entrepreneurial Orientation: How and When CEO Entrepreneurial Orientation Influences Dual CSR Activities.Zhe Zhang, Xin Wang & Ming Jia - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):609-629.
    We explore the potential impact of CEO entrepreneurial orientation on firm choice of CSR activities. Integrating upper echelon theory and attention-based view of the firm, we find that CEO entrepreneurial orientation leads to more engagement in CSR innovation rather than corporate philanthropy. We find that the effect of CEO entrepreneurial orientation on firm choice of CSR activities varies under two situational contexts: state-owned enterprises and incoming/departing CEO. The hypotheses are tested using two different studies. Study 1 uses a cross-sectional survey (...)
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  6.  27
    Does Servant Leadership Affect Employees’ Emotional Labor? A Social Information-Processing Perspective.Junting Lu, Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):507-518.
    Emotion management in the workplace is drawing increasing attention from researchers. However, they still know little about how positive leadership affects employees’ emotional labor. Building on social information-processing theory, we examine whether and how a servant leadership style influences employees’ emotional labor. Using a sample of 305 employees in 81 work units of 25 subcorporations at a food company in China, we find that servant leadership relates negatively to surface acting but relates positively to deep acting at work. We also (...)
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  7.  27
    Word Power: The Impact of Negative Media Coverage on Disciplining Corporate Pollution.Ming Jia, Li Tong, P. V. Viswanath & Zhe Zhang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):437-458.
    Sequences of individual words make up media reports. And sequences of media reports constitute the power of the news media to influence corporate practices. In this paper, we focus on the micro-foundations of news reports to elaborate how an atmosphere of negative news reports following an initial exposure of corporate pollution activity can help stop such activity through their impact on corporate managers. We extend our understanding of the corporate governance effect of news media by considering two new aspects of (...)
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  8.  46
    How Does the Stock Market Value Corporate Social Performance? When Behavioral Theories Interact with Stakeholder Theory.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (3):1-33.
    This study examines how the reference-point effect and sunk-cost fallacy interact with stakeholder theory and influence how investors evaluate corporate social performance. We propose that ex-ante (pre-IPO) corporate social performance influences ex-post (post-IPO) perceived riskiness and that this relationship is U-shaped. We also evaluate how CEO duality and company age moderate this U-shaped relationship. Using young and newly public entrepreneurial firms in China, and focusing on stock returns in the secondary market, empirical results and robustness tests provide strong support for (...)
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  9.  18
    News Visibility and Corporate Philanthropic Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms Following the Wenchuan Earthquake.Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (1):93-114.
    Considerable interest exists regarding the media’s influence on corporate reactions, but the link between media visibility and corporate philanthropic response is not clear. Natural disasters thus provide an environment that makes visible the general processes relevant to that link. Based on agenda-setting theory, stakeholder theory, and impression-management theory, we propose that corporations that are highly visible in the news media are more likely to engage in CPR and donate more money. We also propose that companies with reputations for irresponsibility or (...)
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  10.  2
    Buffering or Aggravating Effect? Examining the Effects of Prior Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Social Irresponsibility.Zhe Zhang, Mijia Gong, Shanshan Zhang & Ming Jia - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Prior studies on stakeholders’ responses to firms with high prior corporate social responsibility engaging in corporate social irresponsibility show inconsistent results. To explore this inconsistency, we focus on the intentionality of CSIR and draw upon cognitive dissonance theory to examine how transgressional CSIR and accidental CSIR differently influence investors’ responses to firms with high prior CSR through both emotional and cognitive processes. An experimental study using a facial expression analysis technology— FaceReader 5.0 and a scenario experiment, reveal that high prior (...)
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  11.  10
    Multilevel Examination of How and When Socially Responsible Human Resource Management Improves the Well-Being of Employees.Zhe Zhang, Juan Wang & Ming Jia - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):55-71.
    Although empirical evidence has shown that socially responsible human resource management practices positively influence employees’ outcomes, knowledge on the social impact of SRHRM practices on employee well-being has been limited. Drawing upon the social information processing theory and attribution theory, we investigate whether, how, and when SRHRM practices increase the well-being of employees. Using multiphase and multilevel data from 474 employees in 50 companies, we find that SRHRM practices positively predict employee well-being and that the relationship is mediated by employees’ (...)
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  12.  3
    Hiding in the Crowd: Government Dependence on Firms, Management Costs of Political Legitimacy, and Modest Imitation.Yi Xiang, Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):629-646.
    Although previous studies primarily claim that government-dependent firms can actively engage in compliance activities in order to achieve political legitimacy, access government resources, and build competitive advantages, these studies largely ignore how firms react when firm-dependent governments exert coercive pressures. We thus introduce institutional theory and the behavioral theory of social performance to develop a model of modest imitation, and we propose that the more governments depend on privately owned firms, the more firms demonstrate average social performance in order to (...)
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