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Miodrag Jovanovic
University of Belgrade
  1.  57
    Are There Universal Collective Rights?Miodrag A. Jovanović - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (1):17-44.
    The first part of the paper focuses on the current debate over the universality of human rights. After conceptually distinguishing between different types of universality, it employs Sen’s definition that the claim of a universal value is the one that people anywhere may have reason to see as valuable. When applied to human rights, this standard implies “thin” (relative, contingent) universality, which might be operationally worked-out as in Donnelly’s three-tiered scheme of concepts–conceptions–implementations. The second part is devoted to collective rights, (...)
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  2. Collective Rights: A Legal Theory.Miodrag A. Jovanović - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    In a departure from the mainstream methodology of a positivist-oriented jurisprudence, Collective Rights provides the first legal-theoretical treatment of this area. It advances a normative-moral standpoint of 'value collectivism' which goes against the traditional political philosophy of liberalism and the dominant ideas of liberal multiculturalism. Moreover, it places a theoretical account of collective rights within the larger debate between proponents of different rights theories. By exploring why 'collective rights' should be differentiated from similar legal concepts, the relationship between collective and (...)
     
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  3. Unpacking Normativity - Conceptual, Normative and Descriptive Issues.Kenneth Einar Himma, Miodrag A. Jovanović & Bojan Spaic (eds.) - 2018
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  4. The Nature of International Law.Miodrag A. Jovanović - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    Jurisprudence has up until recently largely neglected international law as a subject of philosophizing. The Nature of International Law tries to offset against this deficiency by providing a comprehensive explanatory account of international law. It does so within an analytical tradition, albeit within the one which departs from the nowadays dominant method of the metaphysically-driven conceptual analysis. Instead, it adopts the prototype theory of concepts, which is directed towards determining typical features constitutive of the nature of international law. The book's (...)
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