15 found
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  1. Punishment and Justification.Mitchell N. Berman - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2):258-290.
  2.  60
    Rehabilitating Retributivism.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (1):83-108.
    This review essay of Victor Tadros’s new book, “The Ends of Harm: The Moral Foundations of Criminal Law,” responds to Tadros’s energetic and sophisticated attacks on retributivist justifications for criminal punishment. I argue, in a nutshell, that those attacks fail. In defending retributivism, however, I also sketch original views on two questions that retributivism must address but that many or most retributivists have skated past. First, what do wrongdoers deserve – to suffer? to be punished? something else? Second, what does (...)
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  3.  41
    The Normative Functions of Coercion Claims.Mitchell N. Berman - 2002 - Legal Theory 8 (1):45-89.
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  4.  18
    Proportionality, Constraint, and Culpability.Mitchell N. Berman - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (3):373-391.
    Philosophers of criminal punishment widely agree that criminal punishment should be “proportional” to the “seriousness” of the offense. But this apparent consensus is only superficial, masking significant dissensus below the surface. Proposed proportionality principles differ on several distinct dimensions, including: regarding which offense or offender properties determine offense “seriousness” and thus constitute a proportionality relatum; regarding whether punishment is objectionably disproportionate only when excessively severe, or also when excessively lenient; and regarding whether the principle can deliver absolute judgments, or only (...)
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  5.  37
    Sprints, Sports, and Suits.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):163-176.
    Philosophy of sport orthodoxy maintains the following three theses: (1) all sports (or all refereed sports) are games; (2) games are as Suits defined them; and (3) sprints are sports. This article argues that these three theses cannot be jointly maintained and offers exploratory thoughts regarding what might follow.
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  6.  12
    On Interpretivism and Formalism in Sports Officiating: From General to Particular Jurisprudence.Mitchell N. Berman - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):177-196.
  7.  15
    Of Punishment.Mitchell N. Berman - 2012 - In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge. pp. 141.
  8.  5
    Dworkin Versus Hart Revisited: The Challenge of Non-Lexical Determination.Mitchell N. Berman - 2022 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 42 (2):548-577.
    A fundamental task for legal philosophy is to explain what makes it the case that the law has the content that it does. Anti-positivists say that moral norms play an ineliminable role in the determination of legal content, while positivists say that they play no role, or only a contingent one. Increasingly, scholars report finding the debate stale. This article hopes to freshen it by, ironically, revisiting what might be thought its opening round: Dworkin’s challenge to Hartian positivism levelled in (...)
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  9.  38
    Lesser Evils and Justification: A Less Close Look. [REVIEW]Mitchell N. Berman - 2005 - Law and Philosophy 24 (6):681-709.
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  10.  1
    Principles of Proportionate Punishment: Comments on John Deigh, From Psychology to Morality: Essays in Ethical Naturalism.Mitchell N. Berman - 2022 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 104 (3):784-791.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Volume 104, Issue 3, Page 784-791, May 2022.
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  11.  53
    Constitutional Interpretation: Non-Originalism.Mitchell N. Berman - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (6):408-420.
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  12.  9
    Negligence and Culpability: Reflections on Alexander and Ferzan.Mitchell N. Berman - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-14.
    Philosophers of criminal punishment disagree about whether infliction of punishment for negligence can be morally justified. One contending view holds that it cannot be because punishment requires culpability and culpability requires, at a minimum, advertence to the facts that make one’s conduct wrongful. Larry Alexander and Kim Ferzan are prominent champions of this position. This essay challenges that view and their arguments for it. Invoking a conceptual distinction between an agent’s being blameworthy for an act and their deserving punishment for (...)
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  13. 10. Ajume H. Wingo, Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States Ajume H. Wingo, Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Pp. 367-371). [REVIEW]J. David Velleman, Jeanette Kennett, Andrew Altman, Christopher Heath Wellman, Mitchell N. Berman & Ben Bradley - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2).
     
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  14. Construcciones constitucionales Y reglas constitucionales de decisión: Reflexiones sobre el cincelado Del espacio de implementación.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Isonomía. Revista de Teoría y Filosofía Del Derecho 38:105-142.
    Los teóricos estadounidenses conocidos como “los nuevos originalistas” han propuesto en los años recientes una visión de la adjudicación constitucional y de la implementación constitucional extra-judicial que concede un lugar central a la distinción entre “interpretación constitucional” y “construcción constitucional.” La primera es entendida como el proceso consistente en determinar el significado lingüístico del texto constitucional mientras que la construcción es el proceso consistente en traducir el significado lingüístico a tests o reglas jurídicas, paradigmáticamente, aunque de forma no exclusiva, para (...)
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  15. Reflective Equilibrium and Constitutional Method.Mitchell N. Berman - 2011 - In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
     
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