Results for 'Mo-Mo Than'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Current Status of Research Ethics Capacity in Myanmar.Zaw-Zaw Oo, Yin-Thet-Nu Oo, Mo-Mo Than, Khine Zaw Oo, Min Wun, Kyaw-Soe Htun & Henry Silverman - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (2):123-132.
    Myanmar has recently surfaced from total military rule and efforts at conducting research to enhance the health of the population has increased during the recent democratization process, both from the military and civil sectors as well as support from international agencies. International guidelines mandate that such research requires prior ethics review in accordance with international standards. Previous commentators have expressed concerns, however, regarding the degree of adequate training in research ethics for investigators, the optimal functioning of Research Ethics Committees, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  9
    The Need for Po-Mo in Educational Theory is Greater Than Ever.Marilyn Fleer - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1545-1546.
  3.  33
    Ryu Young-Mo’s Understanding of Christ.Heup Young Kim - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:341-349.
    I have been proposing for ‘christo‐dao’ rather than traditional christo-logy or modern christo‐praxis as a more appropriate paradigm for the understanding of Jesus Christ in the new millennium. This christological paradigm shift solicits a radical change of its root-metaphor, from logos (Christ as the incarnate logos) or praxis (Christ as the praxis of God’s reign) to ‘dao’ (Christ as the embodiment of the Dao, the “theanthropocosmic” Way) with a critical new interpretation. For EastAsian Christians, the christological adoption of dao (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  31
    “Will This Potato Grow?” Ultimate Analysis and Conventional Existence in the Madhyamika Philosophy of Tsong Kha Pa Lo Sang Drak Pa’s Lam Rim Chen Mo.Guy Newland - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 12:61-72.
    In this paper, I discuss the problem of how empty persons can make distinctions between right and wrong within the two-truths doctrine of the Buddhist tradition. To do so, I rely on the teachings of the fifteenth- century founder of Tibetan Buddhism, Tsong kha pa Lo sang drak pa. I summarize Tsong kha pa’s exposition of the Buddhist tradition on this question, and then show how he held that profound emptiness, the ultimate truth found under scrupulous analysis of how things (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  38
    “Will This Potato Grow?” Ultimate Analysis and Conventional Existence in the Madhyamika Philosophy of Tsong Kha Pa Lo Sang Drak Pa’s Lam Rim Chen Mo.Guy Newland - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:61-72.
    In this paper, I discuss the problem of how empty persons can make distinctions between right and wrong within the two-truths doctrine of the Buddhist tradition. To do so, I rely on the teachings of the fifteenth- century founder of Tibetan Buddhism, Tsong kha pa Lo sang drak pa. I summarize Tsong kha pa’s exposition of the Buddhist tradition on this question, and then show how he held that profound emptiness, the ultimate truth found under scrupulous analysis of how things (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Historisches Worterbuch der Philosophie: Volume 6: Mo-O.Joachim Ritter, Karlfried Grunder & Gottfried Gabriel (eds.) - 1984 - Verlag Scheidegger and Spiess.
    The Historical Dictionary of Philosophy, the _Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie,_ is distinguished by its particular presentation of philosophical terms, ideas and concepts. Rather than providing mere defintions or descriptive and analytical explanantions the _HWPh _strictly applies the critical method of history of concepts developed by the eminent German scholar and philosopher Joachim Ritter. By means of precise and detailed references it documents the origin, first occurrence, the historical evolution and the changes of meaning of each concept, from Ancient Greek (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  46
    Belief Revision as Propositional Update.Jeff Pelletier - unknown
    In this study, we examine the problem of belief revision, defined as deciding whic h of several initially-accepted sentences to disbelieve, when new information presents a l ogical inconsistency with the initial set. In the first three experiments, the initial sentence set included a conditional sentence, a non-conditional sentence, and an inferred conclusi on drawn from the first two. The new information contradicted the inferred conclusion. Results indicated that the conditional sentences were more readily abandoned than non-c onditional sentences, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Good, the Bad, and the Transitivity of Better Than.Jacob M. Nebel - 2018 - Noûs 52 (4):874-899.
    The Rachels–Temkin spectrum arguments against the transitivity of better than involve good or bad experiences, lives, or outcomes that vary along multiple dimensions—e.g., duration and intensity of pleasure or pain. This paper presents variations on these arguments involving combinations of good and bad experiences, which have even more radical implications than the violation of transitivity. These variations force opponents of transitivity to conclude that something good is worse than something that isn’t good, on pain of rejecting the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9. What Do We Mean When We Ask “Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing?".Andrew Brenner - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (6):1305-1322.
    Let’s call the sentence “why is there something rather than nothing?” the Question. There’s no consensus, of course, regarding which proposed answer to the Question, if any, is correct, but occasionally there’s also controversy regarding the meaning of the Question itself. In this paper I argue that such controversy persists because there just isn’t one unique interpretation of the Question. Rather, the puzzlement expressed by the sentence “why is there something rather than nothing?” varies depending on the ontology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Externalist Moral Motivation.Nick Zangwill - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):143-154.
    “Motivational externalism” is the externalism until they see more of what view that moral judgements have no motisuch a theory would be like. The mere posvational efficacy in themselves, and that sibility of such a theory is not sufficiently when they motivate us, the source of motireassuring, even given strong arguments vation lies outside the moral judgement in against the opposite position. For there may a separate desire. Motivational externalism also be objections to externalism. contrasts with “motivational internalism,” Moral philosophers (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  11. Toward an Affective Problematics: A Deleuze-Guattarian Reading of Morality and Friendship in Toni Morrison’s Sula.Ali Salami & Naeem Nedaee - 2017 - Atlantis 1 (39):113-131.
    It might sound rather convincing to assume that we owe the pleasure of reading the novel form to our elemental repository of physical perception, to our feelings. This would be true only if mere feelings could add up to something more than just emotions, to some deep understanding of the human. After all, a moment of epiphany, where we begin to realize things that dramatically disturb our normal state of mind, is not just emotional, nor indeed a simple moment. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  8
    Visual Design for a Mobile Pandemic Map System for Public Health.May O. Lwin, Janelle S. Ng, Karthikayen Jayasundar, Astrid Kensinger & Sheryl W. Tan - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    Incidence and prevalence rates of dengue have increased over the years, and the disease is quickly becoming cause for concern within the public health community. Globally, 128 countries and slightly under four billion people are at risk of contracting dengue. In Sri Lanka, more than half of dengue cases originate in Colombo, which in previous years, used a manual pen-and-paper data management system, which meant that it was not possible to obtain or provide up-to-date information about the severity and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Nonworseness Claim and the Moral Permissibility of Better-Than-Permissible Acts.Adam D. Bailey - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):237-250.
    Grounded in what Alan Wertheimer terms the nonworseness claim, it is thought by some philosophers that what will be referred to herein as better-than-permissible acts —acts that, if undertaken, would make another or others better off than they would be were an alternative but morally permissible act to be undertaken—are necessarily morally permissible. What, other than a bout of irrationality, it may be thought, would lead one to hold that an act (such as outsourcing production to a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  19
    The Distribution of Quantificational Suffixes in Japanese.Kazuko Yatsushiro - 2009 - Natural Language Semantics 17 (2):141-173.
    The existential and universal quantifiers in Japanese both consist of two morphemes: an indeterminate pronoun and a quantificational suffix. This paper examines the distributional characteristics of these suffixes (ka for the existential quantifier and mo for the universal quantifier). It is shown that ka can appear in a wider range of structural positions than mo can. This difference receives explanation on semantic grounds. I propose that mo is a generalized quantifier. More specifically, I assume that the phrase headed by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15. Hume and Edwards on 'Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing?'.Michael B. Burke - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):355–362.
    Suppose that five minutes ago, to our astonishment, a healthy, full-grown duck suddenly popped into existence on the table in front of us. Suppose further that there was no first time at which the duck existed but rather a last time, T, at which it had yet to exist. Then for each time t at which the duck has existed, there is an explanation of why the duck existed at t: there was a time t’ earlier than t but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  62
    Whatever It is Better to Be Than Not to Be.Martin Lembke - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):131-143.
    The Anselmian claim that God is that than which a greater cannot be thought in virtue of being ‘whatever it is better to be than not to be’ may be accused of incoherence or even unintelligibility. By proposing a non-relative but apparently meaningful analysis thereof, I attempt to defend it against such criticism. In particular, I argue that ‘whatever it is better to be than not to be’ can be plausibly interpreted so as to imply very many (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  24
    Explanation in the Semantic Conception of Theory Structure.Paul Thompson - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:286 - 296.
    During the last ten years John Beatty, Elisabeth Lloyd and I have argued that the semantic conception of theories is, in the context of biological theorizing, a richer conception of theory structure than the syntactic ("received view") conception. Specifically, I have argued semantic conception of theory structure better represents the structure of evolutionary theory and the relationship of this theory to phenomena. One aspect of the semantic conception that is in need of greater attention is the nature of explanation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18.  44
    The Public Good That Does the Public Good: A New Reading of Mohism.Whalen Lai - 1993 - Asian Philosophy 3 (2):125 – 141.
    Abstract Mohism has long been misrepresented. Mo?tzu is usually called a utilitarian because he preached a universal love that must benefit. Yet Mencius, who pined the Confucian way of virtue (humaneness and righteousness) against Mo?tzu's way of benefit, basically borrowed Mo?tzu's thesis: that the root cause of chaos is this lack of love?except Mencius renamed it the desire for personal benefit. Yet Mo?tzu only championed ?benefit? to head off its opposite, ?harm?, specifically the harm done by Confucians who with good (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19.  72
    Essays on More Than Life Itself.A. H. Louie - 2011 - Axiomathes 21 (3):473-489.
    I comment on the preceding essays in this current thematic issue of Axiomathes , essays that discuss my 2009 book More Than Life Itself: A Synthetic Continuation in Relation Biology.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  71
    Mereological Dominance and the Logic of Better-Than.James Goodrich - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (4):361-367.
    It's been argued that better- than is non-transitive – that there are some value bearers for which better- than fails to generate an acyclic ordering. Michael Huemer has offered a powerful objection to this view, which he dubs ‘The Dominance Argument’. In what follows, I consider the extent to which there is a plausible response to be made on behalf of those who hold that better- than is non-transitive. I conclude that there is.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  42
    Representing 3D Ob Jects by Sets of Activities of Receptiv E Elds.Shimon Edelman - unknown
    Idealized mo dels of receptive elds (RFs) can be used as building blocks for the creation of p owerful distributed computation systems. The present rep ort concentrates on inv estigating the utility of collections of RFs in representing 3D objects under changing viewing conditions. The main requirement in this task is that the pattern of activity of RFs vary as little as p ossible when the object and the camera move relative to each other. I propose a method for representing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  33
    “Why Is There Nothing Rather Than Something?”: Less Than Nothing's New Metaphysics.Joseph Carew - 2014 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 8 (1).
    I argue that Žižek's Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism presents us with a radically original variety of metaphysics both in terms of Žižek's own intellectual development and the history of philosophy. Rather than being concerned with the study of being qua being, Less Than Nothing proclaims that we ought to investigate nothing qua nothing inasmuch as contemporary physics demonstrates that the more we analyze reality the more we find a void, this latter (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  19
    Rule Consequentialism and Moral Relativism in Advance.Ryan Jenkins - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
    Rule consequentialism is usually taken to recommend a single ideal code for all moral agents. Here I argue that, depending on their theoretical mo- tivations, some rule consequentialists have good reasons to be relativists. Rule consequentialists who are moved by consequentialist considerations ought to support a scheme of multiple relativized moral codes because we could expect such a scheme to have better consequences in terms of impartial aggregate well- being than a single universal code. Rule consequentialists who nd compelling (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  26
    Revolution, Worldliness, and the Quest for Elitism.Wang Meng - 2000 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (4):46-61.
    Dushu carried a most interesting article in its eleventh issue: "Starlight in the Dark of the Night" . In this article the author, Wu Zengding, introduced to the reader the autobiography of Vera, an aristocratic Russian woman of the nineteenth century who planned the assassination of a Russian tsar. The most engaging part of this article is the analysis—or rather, description—of the "enormous fascination" exerted by revolution. I have said many times that there is nothing more fascinating for young people (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  11
    A Review of the Comparative Study of Mo Yan and Faulkner in China. [REVIEW]Xiuguo Huang - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (227):19-29.
    Mo Yan’s multi-layered and allegorical tales were highly inspired by William Faulkner. Mo Yan’s semi-fictional Gaomi Northeast Township was often linked to William Faulkner’s fictional Yoknapatawpha, and he himself was extolled by the Chinese scholars to be “China’s Faulkner.” Inside China, there have emerged a great number of comparative studies on Faulkner and Mo Yan, which are usually conducted from the perspectives of literary forms, native-soil complex, attitudes towards tradition, the influence of local culture, and so on. However, despite the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  12
    Classics in Chinese Philosophy. [REVIEW]G. W. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (3):525-525.
    This extensive and generally useful anthology contains extracts from the writings of forty-seven Chinese philosophers, ranging from Confucius, Lao Tzu, Mo Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Mencius, and Hsun Tzu in ancient times to Sun Yat-sen, Hu Shih, Mao Tse-tung, and Fung Yu-lan in the twentieth century. Also included are passages from five books of the sayings of Buddha, on the ground, as stated by the editor, that Buddha "was the historic founder of a religion which profoundly influenced Chinese thinkers." The editor’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Uncultivated Man and the Weakness of the Ideal in Classical Chinese Philosophy.Kang Chan - 2000 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    The Chinese philosophical tradition aims at a departure from the imperfect reality for the sake of the ideal. But it is also clear to the Chinese philosophers that most people would not follow their footsteps in discarding reality and seeking the ideal. The weakness of the ideal in its incapacity to change the uncultivated man defines a common thread of philosophical thinking in China, and constitutes a bitter truth which these philosophers do not make explicit. Seven philosophers from the fifth (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Le sfide morali e politiche del cambiamento climatico [The Moral and Political Challenges of Climate Change].Dale Jamieson - 2010 - la Società Degli Individui 39.
    Il cambiamento climatico globale pone sfide senza precedenti ai nostri mo- di di concepire la morale e la politica. Siamo abituati a vedere un problema morale in situazioni in cui un individuo chiaramente identificabile inten- zionalmente ne danneggi un altro, a sua volta chiaramente identificabile; e in cui sia gli individui coinvolti, che il danno in questione, stiano fra loro in una relazione spazio-temporale di vicinanza. Il cambiamento climatico glo- bale danneggerà senz'altro milioni di persone, ma secondo modalità com- pletamente (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  87
    Why Simple Foreknowledge Offers No More Providential Control Than the Openness of God.John Sanders - 1997 - Faith and Philosophy 14 (1):26-40.
    This paper examines the question of whether the theory of simply foreknowledge (SF) provides God with greater providential control than does the theory of present knowledge (PK). It is claimed by the proponents of SF that a deity lacking such knowledge would not be able to provide the sort of providential aid commonly thought by theists to be given by God. To see whether this is the case I first distinguish two different versions of how God’s foreknowledge is accessed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Divisions in Early Mohism Reflected in the Core Chapters of Mo-Tzu.A. C. Graham - 1985 - Institute of East Asian Philosophies, National University of Singapore.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  31
    ``Why Simple Foreknowledge Offers No More Providential Control Than the Openness of God&Quot.John Sanders - 1997 - Faith and Philosophy 14 (1):26-40.
    This paper examines the question of whether the theory of simply foreknowledge (SF) provides God with greater providential control than does the theory of present knowledge (PK). It is claimed by the proponents of SF that a deity lacking such knowledge would not be able to provide the sort of providential aid commonly thought by theists to be given by God. To see whether this is the case I first distinguish two different versions of how God’s foreknowledge is accessed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  29
    Predictive Policies: What Makes Some Policies Better Than Others?Aaron Sloman - 1967 - In Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume. Blackwell-Wiley. pp. 57 - 94.
    Response to "Predictive Policies" by R.S.McGowan Mr. McGowan has assumed that there is a clear distinction between inductive inferences and others, that we all know how to make the distinction, that we all agree that the inductive ones are somehow better or more reasonable than the alternatives, and I have criticised all of these assumptions. Further he hasformulated the philosophical problem of induction as the problem of showing why the inductive ones are better, and he has attempted to show (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  22
    Non-Existent Existing God; Understanding of God From an East Asian Way of Thinking with Specific Reference to the Thought of Dasŏk Yoo Yŏng-Mo.Jeong-Hyun Youn - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:881-905.
    This paper is an interpretation of the thought of the twentieth century Korean religious thinker, Yoo Yŏng-mo (柳永模, 1890-1981), a pioneer figure who sought to re-conceptualise a Christian understanding of the Ultimate Reality in the light of a positive openness to the plurality of Korean religions. Yoo Yŏng-mo considered that it was possible to present an overall picture of harmony and complementarity between the three traditions of Korea and Christianity, and this is endorsed by the present thesis. This essay is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  13
    Testing Therapies Less Effective Than the Best Current Standard: Ethical Beliefs in an International Sample of Researchers.David M. Kent, Mkaya Mwamburi, Richard A. Cash, Tracy L. Rabin & Michael L. Bennish - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):28 – 33.
    Objectives: To test the range of beliefs regarding the ethics of testing, in resource poor settings, new therapies that are less efficacious but more affordable and feasible than the best current therapeutic standard. Design: Using a web-based survey, we presented a hypothetical scenario proposing to test a therapy for HIV disease ("therapeutic inoculation") known to be less efficacious than highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Respondents evaluated various trial designs as ethical or unethical. Participants: 604 subscribers to two listservs (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Female Buddhist Adepts in the Tibetan Tradition. The Twenty-Four Jo Mo, Disciples of Pha Dam Pa Sangs Rgyas.Carla Gianotti - 2019 - Journal of Dharma Studies 2 (1):15-29.
    The Tibetan term jo mo, generally translated as ‘noble Lady,’ ‘female adept,’ or ‘nun’ and documented from the very beginning of Tibetan history, has a mainly religious meaning. Besides various women adepts referred to as jo mo present throughout Tibetan tradition up to the present day, a hagiographic text from the late thirteenth century entitled Jo mo nyis shus rtsa bzhi’i lo rgyus, “The Stories of the Twenty-four Jo mo,” has preserved the short life stories of twenty-four female Tibetan adepts (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  61
    Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism.Slavoj Žižek - 2012 - Verso.
    In Less Than Nothing, the pinnacle publication of a distinguished career, Slavoj i ek argues that it is imperative that we not simply return to Hegel but that we repeat and exceed his triumphs, overcoming his limitations by being even more ...
  37.  77
    Measuring Consciousness: Is One Measure Better Than the Other?Kristian Sandberg, Bert Timmermans, Morten Overgaard & Axel Cleeremans - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1069-1078.
    What is the best way of assessing the extent to which people are aware of a stimulus? Here, using a masked visual identification task, we compared three measures of subjective awareness: The Perceptual Awareness Scale , through which participants are asked to rate the clarity of their visual experience; confidence ratings , through which participants express their confidence in their identification decisions, and Post-decision wagering , in which participants place a monetary wager on their decisions. We conducted detailed explorations of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  38. Legg-Hutter Universal Intelligence Implies Classical Music is Better Than Pop Music for Intellectual Training.Samuel Alexander - 2019 - The Reasoner 13 (11):71-72.
    In their thought-provoking paper, Legg and Hutter consider a certain abstrac- tion of an intelligent agent, and define a universal intelligence measure, which assigns every such agent a numerical intelligence rating. We will briefly summarize Legg and Hutter’s paper, and then give a tongue-in-cheek argument that if one’s goal is to become more intelligent by cultivating music appreciation, then it is bet- ter to use classical music (such as Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven) than to use more recent pop music. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  40
    When Children Are More Logical Than Adults: Experimental Investigations of Scalar Implicature.Ira A. Noveck - 2001 - Cognition 78 (2):165-188.
    A conversational implicature is an inference that consists in attributing to a speaker an implicit meaning that goes beyond the explicit linguistic meaning of an utterance. This paper experimentallyinvestigates scalar implicature, a paradigmatic case of implicature in which a speaker's use of a term like Some indicates that the speaker had reasons not to use a more informative one from the samescale, e.g. All; thus, Some implicates Not all. Pragmatic theorists like Grice would predict that a pragmatic interpretation is determined (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  40. Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing? A Logical Investigation.Jan Heylen - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (3):531-559.
    From Leibniz to Krauss philosophers and scientists have raised the question as to why there is something rather than nothing. Why-questions request a type of explanation and this is often thought to include a deductive component. With classical logic in the background only trivial answers are forthcoming. With free logics in the background, be they of the negative, positive or neutral variety, only question-begging answers are to be expected. The same conclusion is reached for the modal version of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  32
    Insight Solutions Are Correct More Often Than Analytic Solutions.Carola Salvi, Emanuela Bricolo, John Kounios, Edward Bowden & Mark Beeman - 2016 - Thinking and Reasoning 22 (4):443-460.
    ABSTRACTHow accurate are insights compared to analytical solutions? In four experiments, we investigated how participants' solving strategies influenced their solution accuracies across different types of problems, including one that was linguistic, one that was visual and two that were mixed visual-linguistic. In each experiment, participants' self-judged insight solutions were, on average, more accurate than their analytic ones. We hypothesised that insight solutions have superior accuracy because they emerge into consciousness in an all-or-nothing fashion when the unconscious solving process is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  42.  39
    We See More Than We Can Report “Cost Free” Color Phenomenality Outside Focal Attention.Zohar Bronfman, Noam Brezis, Hilla Jacobson & Marius Usher - 2014 - Psychological Science 25.
    The distinction between access consciousness and phenomenal consciousness is a subject of intensive debate. According to one view, visual experience overflows the capacity of the attentional and working memory system: We see more than we can report. According to the opposed view, this perceived richness is an illusion—we are aware only of information that we can subsequently report. This debate remains unresolved because of the inevitable reliance on report, which is limited in capacity. To bypass this limitation, this study (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  43.  37
    Black Hole Thermodynamics: More Than an Analogy?John Dougherty & Craig Callender - unknown
    Black hole thermodynamics is regarded as one of the deepest clues we have to a quantum theory of gravity. It motivates scores of proposals in the field, from the thought that the world is a hologram to calculations in string theory. The rationale for BHT playing this important role, and for much of BHT itself, originates in the analogy between black hole behavior and ordinary thermodynamic systems. Claiming the relationship is “more than a formal analogy,” black holes are said (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  44. When Words Speak Louder Than Actions: Delusion, Belief, and the Power of Assertion.David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy (4):1-18.
    People suffering from severe monothematic delusions, such as Capgras, Fregoli, or Cotard patients, regularly assert extraordinary and unlikely things. For example, some say that their loved ones have been replaced by impostors. A popular view in philosophy and cognitive science is that such monothematic delusions aren't beliefs because they don't guide behaviour and affect in the way that beliefs do. Or, if they are beliefs, they are somehow anomalous, atypical, or marginal beliefs. We present evidence from five studies that folk (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  45. Making the Case That Episodic Recollection is Attributable to Operations Occurring at Retrieval Rather Than to Content Stored in a Dedicated Subsystem of Long-Term Memory.Stan Klein - 2013 - Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7 (3):1-14.
    Episodic memory often is conceptualized as a uniquely human system of long-term memory that makes available knowledge accompanied by the temporal and spatial context in which that knowledge was acquired. Retrieval from episodic memory entails a form of first–person subjectivity called autonoetic consciousness that provides a sense that a recollection was something that took place in the experiencer’s personal past. In this paper I expand on this definition of episodic memory. Specifically, I suggest that (a) the core features assumed unique (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  46. Rethinking Health: Healthy or Healthier Than?S. Andrew Schroeder - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):131-159.
    Theorists of health have, to this point, focused exclusively on trying to define a state—health—that an organism might be in. I argue that they have overlooked the possibility of a comparativist theory of health, which would begin by defining a relation—healthier than—that holds between two organisms or two possible states of the same organism. I show that a comparativist approach to health has a number of attractive features, and has important implications for philosophers of medicine, bioethicists, health economists, and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  47.  46
    On the Grammar and Processing of Proportional Quantifiers: Most Versus More Than Half.Martin Hackl - 2009 - Natural Language Semantics 17 (1):63-98.
    Abstract Proportional quantifiers have played a central role in the development of formal semantics because they set a benchmark for the expressive power needed to describe quantification in natural language (Barwise and Cooper Linguist Philos 4:159–219, 1981). The proportional quantifier most, in particular, supplied the initial motivation for adopting Generalized Quantifier Theory (GQT) because its meaning is definable as a relation between sets of individuals, which are taken to be semantic primitives in GQT. This paper proposes an alternative analysis of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  48. Why Internal Moral Enhancement Might Be Politically Better Than External Moral Enhancement.John Danaher - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (1):39-54.
    Technology could be used to improve morality but it could do so in different ways. Some technologies could augment and enhance moral behaviour externally by using external cues and signals to push and pull us towards morally appropriate behaviours. Other technologies could enhance moral behaviour internally by directly altering the way in which the brain captures and processes morally salient information or initiates moral action. The question is whether there is any reason to prefer one method over the other? In (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. The General Theory of Second Best Is More General Than You Think.David Wiens - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (5):1-26.
    Lipsey and Lancaster's ``general theory of second best'' is widely thought to have significant implications for applied theorizing about the institutions and policies that most effectively implement abstract normative principles. It is also widely thought to have little significance for theorizing about which abstract normative principles we ought to implement. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, I show how the second best theorem can be extended to myriad domains beyond applied normative theorizing, and in particular to more abstract theorizing about the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Why Are Some Moral Beliefs Perceived to Be More Objective Than Others.Geoffrey Goodwin & John M. Darley - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 48 (1):250-256.
    Recent research has investigated whether people think of their moral beliefs as objectively true facts about the world, or as subjective preferences. The present research examines variability in the perceived objectivity of different moral beliefs, with respect both to the content of moral beliefs themselves (what they are about), and to the social representation of those moral beliefs (whether other individuals are thought to hold them). It also examines the possible consequences of perceiving a moral belief as objective. With respect (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000