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  1.  93
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee–Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557 - 569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors (i. e., CSR associations and CSR participation) to understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) relates to employees' identification with their firm.The results reveal that a firm's CSR initiatives increase employee-company identification (E-C identification).E-C identification, in turn, influences employees' commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees' identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige (PEP). Compared to CSR associations, CSR participation has a direct influence (...)
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    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee–Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557-569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors to understand how corporate social responsibility relates to employees’ identification with their firm. The results reveal that a firm’s CSR initiatives increase employee–company identification. E–C identification, in turn, influences employees’ commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees’ identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige. Compared to CSR associations, CSR participation has a direct influence on E–C identification. On the basis of these findings, (...)
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    Consumer Evaluations of Social Alliances: The Effects of Perceived Fit Between Companies and Non-Profit Organizations. [REVIEW]Namin Kim, Youri Sung & Moonkyu Lee - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):163-174.
    Company–cause fit has been one of the major issues in the domain of corporate social responsibility. This study tries to expand the perspective from company–cause to company–non-profit organization (NPO) fit, and it gives implications to firms looking for long-term collaboration with an NPO. Specifically, it suggests three types of fit, i.e., familiarity, business, and activity fit and investigates the potential effects of these fits in social alliances between companies and the partnering NPOs on consumer attributions of the firms’ motives for (...)
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