Results for 'Moral Courage'

984 found
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  1.  75
    Moral courage in nursing: A concept analysis.Olivia Numminen, Hanna Repo & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (8):878-891.
    Background:Nursing as an ethical practice requires courage to be moral, taking tough stands for what is right, and living by one’s moral values. Nurses need moral courage in all areas and at all levels of nursing. Along with new interest in virtue ethics in healthcare, interest in moral courage as a virtue and a valued element of human morality has increased. Nevertheless, what the concept of moral courage means in nursing contexts (...)
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  2.  22
    Moral courage, burnout, professional competence, and compassion fatigue among nurses.Mohammed Hamdan Alshammari & Mohammad Alboliteeh - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (7-8):1068-1082.
    BackgroundMoral courage is the ability to defend and practice ethical and moral action when faced with a challenge, even if it means rejecting pressure to act otherwise. However, moral courage rema...
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  3. Whistle-blowers – morally courageous actors in health care?Johanna Wiisak, Riitta Suhonen & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1415-1429.
    Background Moral courage means courage to act according to individual’s own ethical values and principles despite the risk of negative consequences for them. Research about the moral courage of whistle-blowers in health care is scarce, although whistleblowing involves a significant risk for the whistle-blower. Objective To analyse the moral courage of potential whistle-blowers and its association with their background variables in health care. Research design Was a descriptive-correlational study using a questionnaire, containing Nurses (...)
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  4.  15
    Moral courage of master’s students of nursing during COVID-19.Mingtao Huang, Wenhong Dong, Qianqian Zhao & Nan Mo - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (4):585-597.
    Background Moral courage is a recognized virtue. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the master’s students of nursing (MSNs) in China have shown tenacious moral courage. Objective This study elaborates on the moral courage of Chinese MSNs through their experiences of volunteering during the pandemic. Research Design Descriptive qualitative, interview-based. Participants and Research Context Participants were nursing postgraduate students who participated in the prevention and control of the COVID-19 pandemic selected by purposeful sampling. (...)
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  5. Moral Courage and Facing Others.Matthew Pianalto - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (2):165-184.
    Moral courage involves acting in the service of one’s convictions, in spite of the risk of retaliation or punishment. I suggest that moral courage also involves a capacity to face others as moral agents, and thus in a manner that does not objectify them. A moral stand can only be taken toward another moral agent. Often, we find ourselves unable to face others in this way, because to do so is frightening, or because (...)
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  6.  20
    The moral courage of nursing students who complete advance directives with homeless persons.Woods Nash, Sandra J. Mixer, Polly M. McArthur & Annette Mendola - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (7):743-753.
    Background:Homeless persons in the United States have disproportionately high rates of illness, injury, and mortality and tend to believe that the quality of their end-of-life care will be poor. No studies were found as to whether nurses or nursing students require moral courage to help homeless persons or members of any other demographic complete advance directives.Research hypothesis:We hypothesized that baccalaureate nursing students require moral courage to help homeless persons complete advance directives. Moral courage was (...)
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  7.  52
    Highlighting Moral Courage in the Business Ethics Course.Debra R. Comer & Michael Schwartz - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):703-723.
    At the end of their article in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Business Ethics, Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth, and Catherine E. Schwoerer state that they are “hopeful in outlook” about the “evidence that business ethics instructors are….able to encourage students…to develop the courage to come forward even when pressures in organizations dictate otherwise”. We agree with May et al. that it is essential to augment students’ moral courage. However, it seems overly optimistic (...)
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  8.  37
    Understanding Moral Courage Through a Feminist and Developmental Ethic of Care.Sheldene Simola - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):29-44.
    During the last decade, scholars of business ethics have become increasingly interested in the construct of moral courage. However, despite the importance of understanding both moral courage and the factors that might facilitate its expression, this topic has still received relatively limited study and several areas have been identified as being in need of further exploration. These include the need to investigate courage from within a full range of theoretical frameworks, including feminist ones, from within (...)
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  9.  23
    Moral courage, job-esteem, and social responsibility in disaster relief nurses.Qiang Yu, Huaqin Wang, Yusheng Tian, Qin Wang, Li Yang, Qiaomei Liu & Yamin Li - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (7-8):1051-1067.
    BackgroundSocial responsibility can motivate disaster relief nurses to devote themselves to safeguarding rights and interests of people when facing challenges that threaten public health. However, few studies focused on the relationship of moral courage, job-esteem, and social responsibility among disaster relief nurses.ObjectiveTo explore the influence of moral courage and job-esteem on the social responsibility in disaster relief nurses and clarify the relationship model between them.MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted among 716 disaster relief nurses from 14 hospitals (...)
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  10.  29
    Care situations demanding moral courage: Content analysis of nurses’ experiences.Emmi Kleemola, Helena Leino-Kilpi & Olivia Numminen - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):714-725.
    Background: Nurses encounter complex ethical dilemmas in everyday nursing care. It is important for nurses to have moral courage to act in these situations which threaten patients’ safety or their good care. However, there is lack of research of moral courage. Purpose: This study describes nurses’ experiences of care situations demanding moral courage and their actions in these situations. Method: A qualitative descriptive research design was applied. The data were collected with an open-ended question (...)
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  11. Moral courage in the workplace: Moving to and from the desire and decision to act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (2):132–149.
  12.  9
    Moral courage and manager‐regret.Craig Duckworth - 2023 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 32 (2):467-477.
    It has been suggested that moral courage in the workplace supports more robust application of regulatory principles. A workforce with the courage to act on moral imperative, it is argued, can bolster corporate governance and promote both more stable business organisations and greater economic stability at large. Research in the area investigates the bases of moral courage, a central implication being that businesses should invest in ethical training as a matter of public policy. It (...)
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  13. Integrity, Moral Courage and Innere Führung.Peter Olsthoorn - 2016 - Ethics and Armed Forces 3 (1):32-36.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the usefulness of the somewhat related notions of integrity, moral courage, and Innere Führung (the leadership concept used by the German military) as a means of making military personnel behave ethically. Of these three notions, integrity is mentioned most often within military organizations, and the largest part of what follows is therefore devoted to a description of what integrity is, and what the drawbacks of this notion are for the military. (...)
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  14.  16
    Moral distress, moral courage, and career identity among nurses: A cross-sectional study.Mengyun Peng, Shinya Saito, Hong Guan & Xiaohuan Ma - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (3):358-369.
    BackgroundThe concept of career identity is integral to nursing practices and forms the basis of the nursing professions. Positive career identity is essential for providing high-quality care, optimizing patient outcomes, and enhancing the retention of health professionals. Therefore, there is a need to explore potential influencing variables, thereby developing effective interventions to improve career identity.ObjectivesTo investigate the relationship between moral distress, moral courage, and career identity, and explore the mediating role of moral courage between (...) distress and career identity among nurses.DesignA quantitative, cross-sectional study.MethodsA convenient sample of 800 nurses was recruited from two tertiary care hospitals between February and March 2022. Participants were assessed using the Moral Distress Scale-revised, Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale, and Nursing Career Identity Scale. This study was described in accordance with the STROBE statement.Ethical considerationResearch ethics approval was obtained from the researcher’s university and hospital where this study was conducted prior to data collection.FindingsMoral distress is negatively associated while moral courage is positively associated with career identity among nurses. Moral courage partially mediates the relationship between moral distress and career identity ( β = −0.230 to −0.163, p < 0.01).DiscussionThe findings reveal a relationship between moral distress, moral courage, and career identity among nurses.ConclusionBy paying attention to nurses’ moral distress and courage, healthcare providers can contribute to the development of effective interventions to improve career identity, and subsequently performance, among nurses. (shrink)
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  15.  32
    Crisis, ethical leadership and moral courage: Ethical climate during COVID-19.Nadia Hassan Ali Awad & Heba Mohamed Al-Anwer Ashour - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1441-1456.
    Background The global COVID-19 pandemic has challenged nurse leaders in ways that one could not imagine. Along with ongoing priorities of providing high quality, cost-effective and safe care, nurse leaders are also committed to promote an ethical climate that support nurses’ moral courage for sustaining excellence in patient and family care. Aim This study is directed to develop a structure equation model of crisis, ethical leadership and nurses’ moral courage: mediating effect of ethical climate during COVID-19. (...)
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  16. Measuring nurses’ moral courage: an explorative study.Kasper Jean-Pierre Konings, Chris Gastmans, Olivia Hanneli Numminen, Roelant Claerhout, Glenn Aerts, Helena Leino-Kilpi & Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):114-130.
    Background: The 21-item Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale was developed and validated in 2018 in Finland with the purpose of measuring moral courage among nurses. Objectives: The objective of this study was to make a Dutch translation of the Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale to describe the level of nurses’ self-assessed moral courage and associated socio-demographic factors in Flanders, Belgium. Research design: A forward–backward translation method was applied to translate the English Nurses’ Moral (...)
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  17.  26
    Development and validation of Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale.Olivia Numminen, Jouko Katajisto & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2438-2455.
    Background:Moral courage is required at all levels of nursing. However, there is a need for development of instruments to measure nurses’ moral courage.Objectives:The objective of this study is to develop a scale to measure nurses’ self-assessed moral courage, to evaluate the scale’s psychometric properties, and to briefly describe the current level of nurses’ self-assessed moral courage and associated socio-demographic factors.Research design:In this methodological study, non-experimental, cross-sectional exploratory design was applied. The data were (...)
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  18.  21
    The relationship between nurses’ moral courage and whistleblowing approaches.Şerife Yılmaz & Gamze Özbek Güven - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background Whistleblowing is an action that particularly requires moral courage. Understanding the relationship between nurses’ levels of moral courage and their whistleblowing approaches is important for reducing adverse situations in healthcare services. Objectives This study aims to understand and analyze the relationship between nurses’ levels of moral courage and their whistleblowing approaches. Research design This is a descriptive and correlational study. Methods The study sample consists of 582 nurses actively working in a province in (...)
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  19.  14
    Analysis of graduating nursing students’ moral courage in six European countries.Sanna Koskinen, Elina Pajakoski, Pilar Fuster, Brynja Ingadottir, Eliisa Löyttyniemi, Olivia Numminen, Leena Salminen, P. Anne Scott, Juliane Stubner, Marija Truš, Helena Leino-Kilpi & on Behalf of Procompnurse Consortium - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (4):481-497.
    Background:Moral courage is defined as courage to act according to one’s own ethical values and principles even at the risk of negative consequences for the individual. In a complex nursing practice, ethical considerations are integral. Moral courage is needed throughout nurses’ career.Aim:To analyse graduating nursing students’ moral courage and the factors associated with it in six European countries.Research design:A cross-sectional design, using a structured questionnaire, as part of a larger international ProCompNurse study. In (...)
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  20.  40
    Moral courage in the workplace: moving to and from the desire and decision to act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (2):132-149.
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  21.  20
    Enhancing the moral courage of nurses: A modified Delphi study.Mingtao Huang, Yitao Wei, Qianqian Zhao, Wenhong Dong & Nan Mo - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background The urgency of ensuring adequate moral courage in clinical nursing practice is evident. However, currently, there are few formal intervention plans targeted at enhancing the moral courage of nurses. Aim To develop a training program for improving the moral courage of nurses using the modified Delphi method. Research design A modified Delphi study. Participants and research context From November to December 2022, a literature review and expert group discussion were conducted to develop a (...)
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  22.  94
    The Influence of Business Ethics Education on Moral Efficacy, Moral Meaningfulness, and Moral Courage: A Quasi-experimental Study.Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth & Catherine E. Schwoerer - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):67-80.
    The research described here contributes to the extant empirical research on business ethics education by examining outcomes drawn from the literature on positive organizational scholarship (POS). The general research question explored is whether a course on ethical decision-making in business could positively influence students’ confidence in their abilities to handle ethical problems at work (i.e., moral efficacy), boost the relative importance of ethics in their work lives (i.e., moral meaningfulness), and encourage them to be more courageous in raising (...)
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  23.  16
    Moral courage in medicine--disclosing medical error.J. Banja - 2000 - Bioethics Forum 17 (2):7-11.
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  24.  38
    Editorial adieu: Cultivating moral courage in business.Jack Mahoney - 1998 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 7 (4):187–192.
    Leaving an editorial chair provides an opportunity for the departing incumbent to deliver a final message to his readers. Seven years after founding Business Ethics. A European Review the editor can offer no better valedictory than to explore the role of moral courage in the ethical conduct of business. Not only does this provide an excellent illustration of the recent recovery of the subject of “virtue” ethics in moral philosophy in general, as well as in the application (...)
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  25.  18
    When conscience calls: moral courage in times of confusion and despair.Kristen Renwick Monroe - 2023 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    This is a book about moral choice and courage. It is not, however, an abstract work of moral philosophy or psychology. Rather it is an exploration of the choices made by real individuals faced by moral quandaries. Monroe and her students interviewed people who faced moral dilemmas to see what motivated them to make difficult moral choices. These ranged from public officials dealing with issues of honesty and equity in public policy, to individuals facing (...)
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  26. Relationships between Authentic Leadership, Moral Courage, and Ethical and Pro-Social Behaviors.Sean T. Hannah, Bruce J. Avolio & Fred O. Walumbwa - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):555-578.
    ABSTRACT:Organizations constitute morally-complex environments, requiring organization members to possess levels of moral courage sufficient to promote their ethical action, while refraining from unethical actions when faced with temptations or pressures. Using a sample drawn from a military context, we explored the antecedents and consequences of moral courage. Results from this four-month field study demonstrated that authentic leadership was positively related to followers’ displays of moral courage. Further, followers’ moral courage fully mediated the (...)
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  27.  13
    Moral courage and the normative professionalism of teachers.Thomas Bienengräber - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (2):265-267.
    Cees Klaassen & Nana Maslovaty (Eds), 2010 Rotterdam, Boston and Taipei, Sense Publishers €46.99 (pbk), 243 pp. ISBN 978‐94‐6091‐232‐0 Cynthia S. Pury & Shane J. Lopez (Eds), 2010 Washington DC, Am...
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  28.  71
    Moral sensitivity, moral distress, and moral courage among baccalaureate Filipino nursing students.Rowena L. Escolar-Chua - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (4):458-469.
    Background:Moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral courage among healthcare professionals have been explored considerably in recent years. However, there is a paucity of studies exploring these topics among baccalaureate nursing students.Aim/objective:The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between and among moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral courage of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students.Research design:The research employed a descriptive-correlational design to explore the relationships between and among moral distress, moral (...)
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  29.  37
    The predictive factors of moral courage among hospital nurses.Maryam Dehghani, Roghieh Nazari, Hamid Sharif-Nia, Noushin Mousazadeh & Hamideh Hakimi - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundHaving moral courage is a crucial characteristic for nurses to handle ethical quandaries, stay true to their professional obligations towards patients, and uphold ethical principles. This concept can be influenced by various factors including personal, professional, organizational, and leadership considerations. The purpose of this study was to explore the predictors of moral courage among nurses working in hospitals.MethodsIn 2018, an observational cross-sectional study was carried out on 267 nurses employed in six hospitals located in the northern (...)
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  30.  26
    Developing Resolve to Have Moral Courage.David Christensen, Jeff Barnes & David Rees - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 4:79-96.
    Ethics research literature often uses Rest’s Four Component Model of ethical behavior as a framework to teach business and accounting ethics. Moral motivation, including resolve to have moral courage, is the third component of the model and is the least-tested component in ethics research. Using a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest measurements, we compare the effectiveness of several methods (traditional, exhortation, reflection, moral exemplar) for developing resolve to have moral courage in 211 accounting (...)
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  31.  73
    Moral Courage Through a Collective Voice.Julie Aultman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):67-69.
  32.  28
    A vulnerable journey towards professional empathy and moral courage.Anne Kari Tolo Heggestad, Anne-Sophie Konow-Lund, Bjørg Christiansen & Per Nortvedt - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):927-937.
    Background: Empathy and moral courage are important virtues in nursing and nursing ethics. Hence, it is of great importance that nursing students and nurses develop their ability to empathize and their willingness to demonstrate moral courage. Research aim: The aim of this article is to explore third-year undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions and experiences in developing empathy and moral courage. Research design: This study employed a longitudinal qualitative design based on individual interviews. Participants and research (...)
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  33. Professional moral courage : establishing ethical strength in organizational settings.Leslie E. Sekerka - 2013 - In Ronald J. Burke (ed.), Human frailties: wrong choices on the drive to success. Burlington: Gower Publishing.
     
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  34.  35
    From Intellectual Courage to Moral Courage.Eric M. Peterson - 2018 - Business Ethics Journal Review 6 (5):24-29.
    Comer and Schwartz argue that the business ethics course should aim to cultivate moral courage within our students. Essential to their argument is the use of fictional exemplars of moral courage to motivate our students. I argue that the classroom, even when supplemented by good fiction, is not the right context by which to practice moral courage—the habituation of moral courage requires a context of risk. I suggest a virtue that can be (...)
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  35.  45
    Concept analysis of moral courage in nursing: A hybrid model.Afsaneh Sadooghiasl, Soroor Parvizy & Abbas Ebadi - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (1):6-19.
  36.  26
    Developing Resolve to Have Moral Courage.David Christensen, Jeff Barnes & David Rees - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 4:79-96.
    Ethics research literature often uses Rest’s Four Component Model of ethical behavior as a framework to teach business and accounting ethics. Moral motivation, including resolve to have moral courage, is the third component of the model and is the least-tested component in ethics research. Using a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest measurements, we compare the effectiveness of several methods (traditional, exhortation, reflection, moral exemplar) for developing resolve to have moral courage in 211 accounting (...)
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  37.  38
    Moral Courage, Digital Distrust: Ethics in a Troubled World.Rushworth M. Kidder - 2005 - Business and Society Review 110 (4):485-505.
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  38.  35
    See something, say something? exploring the gap between real and imagined moral courage.Nathan S. Kemper, Dylan S. Campbell & Anna-Kaisa Reiman - 2023 - Ethics and Behavior 33 (6):529-550.
    Research shows that people often do not intervene to stop immoral action from happening. However, limited information is available on why people fail to intervene. Two preregistered studies (Ns = 248, 131) explored this gap in the literature by staging a theft in front of participants and immediately interviewing them to inquire about their reasons for intervening or not intervening. Across both studies, most participants did not try to stop the theft or even report it to the experimenter afterward. Furthermore, (...)
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  39.  16
    Resistance, Medicine, and Moral Courage: Lessons on Bioethics from Jewish Physicians during the Holocaust.Jason Adam Wasserman & Herbert Yoskowitz - 2019 - Conatus 4 (2):359.
    There is a perpetrator historiography of the Holocaust and a Jewish historiography of the Holocaust. The former has received the lion’s share of attention in bioethics, particularly in the form of warnings about medicine’s potential for complicity in human atrocity. However, stories of Jewish physicians during the Holocaust are instructive for positive bioethics, one that moves beyond warnings about what not to do. In exercising both explicit and introspective forms of resistance, the heroic work of Jewish physicians in the ghettos (...)
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  40. courage, Evidence, And Epistemic Virtue.Osvil Acosta-Morales - 2006 - Florida Philosophical Review 6 (1):8-16.
    I present here a case against the evidentialist approach that claims that in so far as our interests are epistemic what should guide our belief formation and revision is always a strict adherence to the available evidence. I go on to make the stronger claim that some beliefs based on admittedly “insufficient” evidence may exhibit epistemic virtue. I propose that we consider a form of courage to be an intellectual or epistemic virtue. It is through this notion of (...) that we can see a weakness in the evidentialist position. Adopting a doxastically courageous approach allows us to acknowledge the role that evidence has in epistemic justification and its connection with promoting epistemic value, but it avoids the narrowness of an evidentialist position. The epistemically courageous agent is not one who disregards the evidence entirely, but she also realizes that taking risks will not necessarily keep her from her epistemic goals. Believing something in the face of insufficient evidence is not always an epistemic vice to be avoided, and the agent that recognizes this is better off for it. (shrink)
     
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  41.  16
    Academic nursing leadership in the U.S.: a case study of competition, compromise and moral courage.Eileen Walsh & Tom Olson - 2019 - International Journal for Educational Integrity 15 (1).
    Public, private, non-profit and for-profit nursing education enterprises in the U.S. are competing with one another in a newly complex and volatile educational landscape, placing academic leaders into situations fraught with moral, ethical and legal compromise with few precedents for guidance. This case study provides a richly contextualized narrative exploration of ethical and legal challenges to one leader’s moral courage, a fictionalized exploration drawn from multiple sources over time, to form a composite that is nonetheless firmly rooted (...)
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  42.  31
    Martial and Moral Courage in Teleoperated Warfare: A Commentary on Kirkpatrick.Robert Sparrow - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (3-4):220-227.
    ABSTRACTJesse Kirkpatrick's ‘Drones and the Martial Virtue Courage’ constitutes the most thorough attempt to date to show that the operators of remotely piloted aircraft can display martial courage and therefore that it may sometimes be appropriate to award them military honours. I argue that while Kirkpatrick's account usefully draws our attention to the risks faced by drone operators and to the possibility that courage may be required to face these risks, he is much less successful in establishing (...)
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  43.  30
    Does Supervisor’s Moral Courage to Go Beyond Compliance Have a Role in the Relationships Between Teamwork Quality, Team Creativity, and Team Idea Implementation?Carlos Ferreira Peralta, Maria Francisca Saldanha, Paulo Nuno Lopes, Paulo Renato Lourenço & Leonor Pais - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):677-696.
    Drawing on the interactionist perspective of innovation and on the sustainable ethical strength framework, the present research examines the moderating role of supervisors’ moral courage to go beyond compliance in the relationships between teamwork quality, team creativity, and team idea implementation. Two field studies, using multi-source and multi-wave data, indicated that teamwork quality was positively related to team idea implementation via team creativity, particularly when team supervisors revealed moral courage to go beyond compliance. When supervisors lacked (...)
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  44.  35
    Facing Ethical Challenges in the Workplace: Conceptualizing and Measuring Professional Moral Courage.Leslie E. Sekerka, Richard P. Bagozzi & Richard Charnigo - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):565-579.
    Scholars have shown renewed interest in the construct of courage. Recent studies have explored its theoretical underpinnings and measurement. Yet courage is generally discussed in its broad form to include physical, psychological, and moral features. To understand a more practical form of moral courage, research is needed to uncover how ethical challenges are effectively managed in organizational settings. We argue that professional moral courage (PMC) is a managerial competency. To describe it and derive (...)
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  45.  25
    Role of Moral Identity and Moral Courage Characteristics in Adolescents’ Tendencies to Be a Moral Rebel.Tammy L. Sonnentag & Mark A. Barnett - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (4):277-299.
    Extending prior research on the characteristics potentially associated with adolescents’ tendencies to be a moral rebel, the present study found that adolescents themselves, their peers, and their teachers agreed on adolescents’ tendencies to possess a moral identity, possess moral courage characteristics, and be a moral rebel. Although moral identity did not consistently predict the tendency to be a moral rebel, all indices of the adolescents’ moral courage characteristics positively predicted the tendency (...)
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  46.  26
    Fostering Collective Growth and Vitality Following Acts of Moral Courage: A General System, Relational Psychodynamic Perspective.Sheldene Simola - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):169-182.
    The purpose of this article is to explore a critical paradox related to the expression of moral courage in organizations, which is that although morally courageous acts are aimed at fostering collective growth, vitality, and virtue, their initial result is typically one of collective unease, preoccupation, or lapse, reflected in the social ostracism and censure of the courageous member and message. Therefore, this article addresses the questions of why many organizational groups suffer stagnation or decline rather than growth (...)
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  47.  22
    Moral Courage in Organizations: Doing the Right Thing at Work, ed. Debra R. Comer and Gina Vega , ISBN 978-0-7656-2410-9, $39.95 ; 978-0-7656-2409-3, $89.95 , 272 pp. [REVIEW]Howard Harris - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):147-150.
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  48.  30
    Leading with moral courage: The interplay of guilt and courage on perceived ethical leadership and group organizational citizenship behaviors.Juliana Mansur, Filipe Sobral & Gazi Islam - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (3):587-601.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  49.  25
    The Benefits to the Human Spirit of Acting Ethically at Work: The Effects of Professional Moral Courage on Work Meaningfulness and Life Well-Being.Douglas R. May & Matthew D. Deeg - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (2):397-411.
    AbstractOrganizations receive multiple benefits when their members act ethically. Of interest in this study is if the actors receive benefits as well, especially as individuals look to work to fulfill psychological and social needs in addition to economic ones. Specifically, we highlight a series of ongoing ethical practices embodied in professional moral courage and their relationship to actor’s work meaningfulness and life well-being. Drawing on self-determination theory and affective events theory, we explore how exercising professional moral (...) in one’s work leads to positive work and life outcomes. Data from 106 administrative staff of non-profit organizations demonstrates the positive benefits of adopting ethical practices at work. Specifically, professional moral courage is found to be significantly related to both work meaningfulness and individual eudaimonic life well-being. Our findings note positive benefits for individuals who incorporate professional moral courage into their daily lives and provide support for organizations seeking to encourage it from their employees; benefits for organizations and employees go beyond just the gains from ethical behavior into other positive psychological processes. Implications for future work that considers both the psychological and normative approaches to meaningful work are discussed. (shrink)
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  50.  45
    An Experiential Exercise that Introduces the Concept of the Personal Ethical Threshold to Develop Moral Courage.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):171-197.
    This paper presents an experiential exercise introducing the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET) to help explain why moral behavior does not always follow moral intention. An individual’s PET represents the individual’s vulnerability to situational factors, i.e., how little or much it takes for members of organizations to cross their proverbial line to act in a way they deem unethical. The PET reflects the interplay among the situation, the particular ethical issue, and the individual. Exploring the PET (...)
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