Results for 'Moral Obligation'

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  1. Moral Obligation of Pharmaceutical Companies Towards HIV Victims in Developing Countries.Azam Golam - 2008 - The Dhaka University Studies 64 (1):197-212.
    The objective of the paper is to analyze whether that the pharmaceutical companies producing HIV drugs have moral obligation(s) towards the HIV victims in developing countries who don‟t have access to get drug to reduce their risks. The primary assessment is that the pharmaceutical companies have minimum moral obligation(s) to the HIV patients especially in developing countries. It is because they are human beings and hence they are the subject of moral considerations. The paper argues (...)
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  2.  50
    Ignorance and Moral Obligation, Written by Michael J. Zimmerman. [REVIEW]Jonathan Spelman - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (3):364-367.
    In 2006, Michael Zimmerman published an underappreciated paper on the nature of moral obligation in which he argued that our moral obligations depend, not on the facts or our beliefs, but on the evidence available to us. Two years later, he published a lengthy book in which he argued more thoroughly for the same conclusion. In this book, Zimmerman returns to the central question of those works to respond to objections that have been brought against the views (...)
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  3.  71
    The Influence of Perceived Importance of an Ethical Issue on Moral Judgment, Moral Obligation, and Moral Intent.Russell Haines, Marc D. Street & Douglas Haines - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):387-399.
    The study extends and tests the issue contingent four-component model of ethical decision-making to include moral obligation. A web-based questionnaire was used to gauge the influence of perceived importance of an ethical issue on moral judgment and moral intent. Perceived importance of an ethical issue was found to be a predictor of moral judgment but not of moral intent as predicted. Moral obligation is suggested to be a process that occurs after a (...)
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  4.  45
    Is There a Moral Obligation to Develop Brain Implants Involving NanoBionic Technologies? Ethical Issues for Clinical Trials.Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (1):49-56.
    In their article published in Nanoethics, “Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques”, Berger et al. suggest that there may be a prima facie moral obligation to improve neuro implants with nanotechnology given their possible therapeutic advantages for patients [Nanoethics, 2:241–249]. Although we agree with Berger et al. that developments in nanomedicine hold the potential to render brain implant technologies less invasive and to better target neural stimulation to respond to brain impairments in (...)
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  5. Skeptical Theism and Moral Obligation.Stephen Maitzen - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (2):93 - 103.
    Skeptical theism claims that the probability of a perfect God’s existence isn’t at all reduced by our failure to see how such a God could allow the horrific suffering that occurs in our world. Given our finite grasp of the realm of value, skeptical theists argue, it shouldn’t surprise us that we fail to see the reasons that justify God in allowing such suffering, and thus our failure to see those reasons is no evidence against God’s existence or perfection. Critics (...)
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  6. Moral Obligation, Self-Interest and The Transitivity Problem.Alfred Archer - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (4):441-464.
    Is the relation ‘is a morally permissible alternative to’ transitive? The answer seems to be a straightforward yes. If Act B is a morally permissible alternative to Act A and Act C is a morally permissible alternative to B then how could C fail to be a morally permissible alternative to A? However, as both Dale Dorsey and Frances Kamm point out, there are cases where this transitivity appears problematic. My aim in this paper is to provide a solution to (...)
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  7. Agnosticism, Skeptical Theism, and Moral Obligation.Stephen Maitzen - forthcoming - In Trent G. Dougherty & Justin P. McBrayer (eds.), Skeptical Theism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Skeptical theism combines theism with skepticism about our capacity to discern God’s morally sufficient reasons for permitting evil. Proponents have claimed that skeptical theism defeats the evidential argument from evil. Many opponents have objected that it implies untenable moral skepticism, induces appalling moral paralysis, and the like. Recently Daniel Howard-Snyder has tried to rebut this prevalent objection to skeptical theism by rebutting it as an objection to the skeptical part of skeptical theism, which part he labels “Agnosticism” (with (...)
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  8.  10
    Brain Drain, Contracts, and Moral Obligation.Daniel Edward Callies - 2016 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 3 (1).
    In this paper I first argue that when answering the question of whether or not governments may restrict emigration, Brock and Blake are staking out positions not astronomically far from one another. Despite the ostensibly large philosophical gap between the two, both think that certain governments may restrict emigration when such restriction is agreed to in a morally binding contract. Secondly, both authors think that there are specific “circumstances” or “conditions” under which a contract that restricts emigration can be morally (...)
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  9. The Limits of Moral Obligation: Moral Demandingness and Ought Implies Can.Marcel van Ackeren & Michael Kühler (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    This volume responds to the growing interest in finding explanations for why moral claims may lose their validity based on what they ask of their addressees. Two main ideas relate to that question: the moral demandingness objection and the principle "ought implies can." Though both of these ideas can be understood to provide an answer to the same question, they have usually been discussed separately in the philosophical literature. The aim of this collection is to provide a focused (...)
     
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  10.  32
    Local Attitudes, Moral Obligation, Customary Obedience and Other Cultural Practices: Their Influence on the Process of Gaining Informed Consent for Surgery in a Tertiary Institution in a Developing Country.David O. Irabor & Peter Omonzejele - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):34-42.
  11.  43
    Marcel van Ackeren and Michael Kühler (Eds.): The Limits of Moral Obligation: Moral Demandingness and Ought Implies Can. [REVIEW]Lukas Naegeli - 2018 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 95 (1):148-152.
  12. Inability and Obligation in Moral Judgment.Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2015 - PLoS ONE 10 (8).
    It is often thought that judgments about what we ought to do are limited by judgments about what we can do, or that “ought implies can.” We conducted eight experiments to test the link between a range of moral requirements and abilities in ordinary moral evaluations. Moral obligations were repeatedly attributed in tandem with inability, regardless of the type (Experiments 1–3), temporal duration (Experiment 5), or scope (Experiment 6) of inability. This pattern was consistently observed using a (...)
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  13. The Moral Obligation to Obey Law.Mark Tunick - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):464–482.
    Is it always morally wrong to violate a law and in doing so does one necessarily act badly? I argue that whether in breaking a law one acts badly depends on considerations unique to the particular act of lawbreaking. The moral judgment in question is deeply contextual and cannot be settled by appeal to blanket moral rules such as that it is wrong to break (any) law. The argument is made by focusing on the example of a runner (...)
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  14.  58
    Ignorance and Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael J. Zimmerman explores whether and how our ignorance about ourselves and our circumstances affects what our moral obligations and moral rights are. He rejects objective and subjective views of the nature of moral obligation, and presents a new case for a 'prospective' view.
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  15. The Concept of Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    The principal aim of this book is to develop and defend an analysis of the concept of moral obligation. The analysis is neutral regarding competing substantive theories of obligation, whether consequentialist or deontological in character. What it seeks to do is generate solutions to a range of philosophical problems concerning obligation and its application. Amongst these problems are deontic paradoxes, the supersession of obligation, conditional obligation, prima facie obligation, actualism and possibilism, dilemmas, supererogation, (...)
  16.  27
    What Is The Basis of Moral Obligation?H. A. Prichard - 2002 - In Jim MacAdam (ed.), Moral Writings. Clarendon Press.
    To the question ‘What is the basis of moral obligation?’, argues that there is no general answer. It is improper to imply that all right acts are right for the same reason. Before defending this view, considers two possible grounds for moral obligation: 1) the goodness of the effects of an action, and 2) the goodness of the act itself. Whereas the former, which is broadly utilitarian, fails to comply with our real moral convictions, the (...)
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  17. On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2006 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577-597.
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, from which he inferred what (...)
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  18.  92
    Non-Discrimination in Human Resources Management as a Moral Obligation.Geert Demuijnck - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):83-101.
    In this paper, I will argue that it is a moral obligation for companies, firstly, to accept their moral responsibility with respect to non-discrimination, and secondly, to address the issue with a full-fledged programme, including but not limited to the countering of microsocial discrimination processes through specific policies. On the basis of a broad sketch of how some discrimination mechanisms are actually influencing decisions, that is, causing intended as well as unintended bias in Human Resources Management (HRM), (...)
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  19.  86
    God and Moral Obligation.C. Stephen Evans - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    God and moral obligations -- What is a divine command theory of moral obligation? -- The relation of divine command theory to natural law and virtue ethics -- Objections to divine command theory -- Alternatives to a divine command theory -- Conclusions: The inescapability of moral obligations.
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  20.  31
    Viewing Research Participation as a Moral Obligation: In Whose Interests?Stuart Rennie - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):40.
    Over the past few years, a growing number of people have called for reconceptualizing participation in health research as a moral obligation. John Harris argues that seriously debilitating diseases give rise to important needs, and since medical research is necessary to relieve those needs in many circumstances, people are morally obligated to act as research subjects.1 Rosamond Rhodes claims that research participation is a moral obligation for reasons of justice, beneficence, and self-development: because we all benefit (...)
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  21. The Concept of Moral Obligation: Anscombe Contra Korsgaard: Maria Alvarez and Aaron Ridley.Maria Alvarez - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (4):543-552.
    A number of recent writers have expressed scepticism about the viability of a specifically moral concept of obligation, and some of the considerations offered have been interesting and persuasive. This is a scepticism that has its roots in Nietzsche, even if he is mentioned only rather rarely in the debate. More proximately, the scepticism in question receives seminal expression in Elizabeth Anscombe's 1958 essay, ‘Modern Moral Philosophy’, a piece that is often paid lip-service to, but—like Nietzsche's work—has (...)
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  22. Our Moral Obligation to Support Space Exploration.James S. J. Schwartz - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (1):67-88.
    The moral obligation to support space exploration follows from our obligations to protect the environment and to survive as a species. It can be justified through three related arguments: one supporting space exploration as necessary for acquiring resources, and two illustrating the need for space technology in order to combat extraterrestrial threats such as meteorite impacts. Three sorts of objections have been raised against this obligation. The first are objections alleging that supporting space exploration is impractical. The (...)
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  23. Divine Command, Divine Will, and Moral Obligation.Mark C. Murphy - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (1):3-27.
    In this article I consider the respective merits of three interpretations of divine command theory. On DCT1, S’s being morally obligated to φ depends on God’s command that S φ; on DCT2, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S be morally obligated to φ; on DCT3, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S φ. I argue that the positive reasons that have been brought forward in favor of DCT1 have implications theists would (...)
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  24.  24
    How the Good Obligates in Hegel's Conception of Sittlichkeit: A Response to Robert Stern's Understanding Moral Obligation.Dean Moyar - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (6):584-605.
    In Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Robert Stern argues that Hegel has a social command view of obligation. On this view, there is an element of social command or social sanction that must be added to a judgment of the good in order to bring about an obligation. I argue to the contrary that Hegel's conception of conscience, and thus the individual's role in obligation, is more central to his account than the social dimension. (...)
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  25. Moral Obligation: Form and Substance.Stephen Darwall - 2010 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (1pt1):31-46.
    Beginning from an analysis of moral obligation's form that I defend in The Second-Person Standpoint as what we are answerable for as beings with the necessary capacities to enter into relations of mutual accountability, I argue that this analysis has implications for moral obligation's substance. Given what it is to take responsibility for oneself and hold oneself answerable, I argue, it follows that if there are any moral obligations at all, then there must exist a (...)
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  26.  29
    Thinking Outside the Circle: The Place of Kierkegaard in Stern's Understanding Moral Obligation.William Bristow - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (6):606-621.
    In Understanding Moral Obligation, Robert Stern presents an interesting account of the history of ethics from Kant through Hegel and Kierkegaard. I argue that Stern in this account misinterprets Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Works of Love by reading them as presenting a Divine Command Theory of moral obligation, as a philosophical account meant to compete with those of Kant and Hegel. It mistakes, indeed subverts, Kierkegaard's purposes to read him as engaging in a philosophical dialectic (...)
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  27. Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW]H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr - 2010 - In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Social Philosophy and Policy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes (...)
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  28.  59
    Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity.Joachim Boldt - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are examined in order (...)
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  29.  14
    Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G. W. F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe: H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. [REVIEW]H. Tristram Engelhardt - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes (...)
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  30.  54
    Is Eating Locally a Moral Obligation?Gregory R. Peterson - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):421-437.
    Advocates of eating locally offer a wide range of arguments in favor of the practice, but their ethical import is not always clear. Some locavore statements and arguments seem to imply a strong form of moral obligation; that eating locally is not merely instrumental to some other good, but has intrinsic value in its own right. This article examines standard arguments on behalf of eating locally, including arguments linked to the value of small farms and agrarianism, the environment, (...)
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  31.  16
    A Critique of Integrity: Has a Commander a Moral Obligation to Uphold His Own Principles?Peter Olsthoorn - 2009 - Journal of Military Ethics 8 (2):90-104.
    Integrity is generally considered to be an important military virtue. The first part of this article tries to make sense of integrity’s many, often contradicting, meanings. Both in the military and elsewhere, its most common understanding seems to be that integrity requires us to live according to one’s personal principal values and principles we have a moral obligation to do so, and it is a prerequisite to be able to ‘look ourselves in the mirror.’ This notion of integrity (...)
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  32.  80
    Caring at a Distance: (Im)Partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Partiality, Distance and Moral Obligation.John Cottingham - 2000 - Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):309 – 313.
    (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Partiality, Distance and Moral Obligation. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 309-313. doi: 10.1080/713665894.
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  33.  66
    Zimmerman, Michael J.. Ignorance and Moral Obligation.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. Ix+149. $55.00.Douglas W. Portmore - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1236-1241.
    Review of Michael J. Zimmerman's Ignorance and Moral Obligation.
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  34.  51
    Review: Michael J. Zimmerman, Ignorance and Moral Obligation[REVIEW]Douglas W. Portmore - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1236-1241.
    Review of Michael J. Zimmerman's Ignorance and Moral Obligation.
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  35. Moral Obligation, Blame, and Self-Governance.John Skorupski - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):158-180.
    This paper shows how moral concepts are definable in terms of reasons for the blame sentiment. It then shows how, given that definition, the categoricity of moral obligation follows from some plausible principles about reasons for blame. The nature of moral agency is further considered in this light. In particular, in what sense is it self-governing agency? Self-governing actors must be at least self-determining: that is, they must be able to think about what reasons they have, (...)
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  36.  91
    Practical Reason and the Status of Moral Obligation.Robert Audi - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (5):pp. 197-229.
    The article presents the author's views concerning the philosophical views regarding ethical obligation. He emphasizes the general, moral, and practical skepticism of the moral obligation. He provides information on the notions about normative externalism. The conflicting ideas between egoistic and intrapersonal are also discussed.
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  37.  9
    Rejecting Moral Obligation.Simon Robertson - 2005 - Dissertation, St. Andrews
    The thesis argues that, were there any moral obligations, they would be categorical; but there are no categorical requirements on action; therefore, there are no moral obligations. The underlying claim is that, because of this, morality itself rests on a mistaken view of normativity. The view of categoricity I provide rests on there being 'external reasons' for action. Having explained the connections between oughts and reasons for action in the first part of the thesis, I then develop and (...)
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  38.  54
    Is There a Moral Obligation to Obey God?Owen McLeod - 2000 - Philo 3 (1):20-31.
    A widespread view among theists is that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. In this paper, four arguments for this view are considered: the argument from beneficence; the argument from property rights; the argument from justice; and the argument from omnipotence and moral perfection. It is argued that none of these arguments succeeds in showing that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. The paper concludes with the suggestion that there (...)
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  39.  32
    Self-Interest and Benevolence in Hume's Account of Moral Obligation.Thomas Huff - 1972 - Ethics 83 (1):58-70.
    Wand argues in "hume's account of obligation" that hume's view of obligation precludes 'our recognizing, After deliberate reflection, That... A certain action is right, And our failure to carry it out makes us morally responsible for it.' huff argues that wand's failure to distinguish the motives which originate the conventions of society from the motives which sustain such conventions leads to an inadequate account of hume's view of moral obligation and responsible action.
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  40.  27
    Moral Obligation and Everyday Advice.Bob Brecher - 2005 - South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):109-120.
    A major obstacle in the way of any rationalistic understanding of morality is that the moral ‘ought' obliges action: and on the (neo-)Humean view, action is thought to require affect. If, however, one could show that “ordinary” practical reasons are by themselves action-guiding, then moral reasons – a particular sort of practical reasons – also have no need of desire to “move” us to act. So how does the practical ‘ought' work? To answer that, we need to ask (...)
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  41.  5
    Wat Heeft God Met De Moraal Te Maken? - What Has God To Do With Morality?De Goddelijke Gebodstheorie Van De Morele Verplichting - The Divine Command Theory Of Moral Obligation.A. Van Den Beld - 1997 - Bijdragen 58 (4):362-380.
    The article deals with the classical idea that God's will is the foundation of moral obligation. The particular theory should be understood as a theory of a certain moral practice. Therefore, its 'Sitz im Leben' is first invoked by means of an episode of Walter Scott's The Heart of Midlothian. Then a strong version of the theory is stated and defended against a couple of current and classical objections. A successful defense would give rational support to the (...)
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  42.  37
    Military Service and Moral Obligation.Hugo Adam Bedau - 1971 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 14 (1-4):244 – 266.
    The author investigates the view that there is a moral obligation to serve in the armed forces of the nation State of which one is a citizen resident (with special reference to young American men at the present time). It is conceded that under current law in this country there may be such a legal obligation, that many men may be obliged to render such service, and that under certain circumstances even a moral obligation to (...)
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  43.  22
    The West's Moral Obligation to Assist Developing Nations in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS.Samuel H. Nelson - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (1):87-108.
    The HIV/AIDS epidemic is increasingly a diseaseof the disadvantaged, a destroyer of nations,and a threat to global security and well-being.But this need not be so: the world has thescientific knowledge, technologicalinnovations, and financial resources tosignificantly reduce the spread and sufferingcaused by the disease. This paper argues thatthe wealthy nations of the world, led by theUnited States, have a moral obligation to offermuch greater assistance to developing countrieswhere the epidemic is most severe. UsingZimbabwe as a case study, this essay (...)
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  44.  20
    Sources of Moral Obligation to Non-Muslims in the Fiqh Al-Aqalliyyat (Jurisprudence of Muslim Minorities) Discourse.Andrew F. March - unknown
    This article surveys four approaches to moral obligation to non-Muslims found in Islamic legal thought. The first three approaches I refer to in this article as the "revelatory-deontological," the "contractualist-constructivist" and the "consequentialist-utilitarian." The main argument of this article is that present in many of the contemporary works on the "jurisprudence of Muslim minorities" (fiqh al-aqalliyyat) is an attempt to provide an Islamic foundation for a relatively thick and rich relationship of moral obligation and solidarity with (...)
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  45.  12
    Agency and Urgency: The Origin of Moral Obligation.K. H. T. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):361-361.
    Wren’s basic thesis is that moral obligation is logically involved in the very concept of human agency. Basic to the notion of agency or action is intention, and the book’s basic argument rests upon this latter notion. In addition to explicit intentions, human agency is also characterized by implicit or tacit intentions. In simplest terms, our sense of moral obligation is a tacit intention which characterizes all agency. At one level, tacit intention is a sheerly formal (...)
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  46. The Concept of Moral Obligation[REVIEW]Christopher G. Griffin - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):805-806.
    How are we to understand the claim that, morally speaking, one ought to do the best one can? We must, of course, refer at some point to a substantive moral theory to flesh out the evaluative term “best,” and much of moral philosophy is devoted to defending one or another such theory. But Michael Zimmerman proposes that moral theorizing may be usefully served by a prior and separate metaethical enterprise—viz., a formal analysis of the concept of (...) obligation. This analysis is undertaken in Zimmerman’s recent book. (shrink)
     
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  47. The Moral Obligation to Create Children with the Best Chance of the Best Life.Julian Savulescu & Guy Kahane - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (5):274-290.
    According to what we call the Principle of Procreative Beneficence, couples who decide to have a child have a significant moral reason to select the child who, given his or her genetic endowment, can be expected to enjoy the most well-being. In the first part of this paper, we introduce PB, explain its content, grounds, and implications, and defend it against various objections. In the second part, we argue that PB is superior to competing principles of procreative selection such (...)
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  48.  88
    You Ought to Be Ashamed of Yourself (When You Violate an Imperfect Moral Obligation).Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):193-208.
    The distinction between perfect and imperfect obligations has a long history in moral philosophy and is important to many central issues in moral theory and in everyday morality. Unfortunately, this distinction is often overlooked and rarely defined precisely or univocally. This paper tries to clarify the distinction in light of recent empirical research on guilt and shame. I begin with the general notion of an obligation before distinguishing its sub-classes.
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  49.  92
    Is There a Moral Obligation to Have Children?Saul Smilansky - 1995 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):41-53.
    ABSTRACT I argue, counter‐intuitively, that under certain conditions many people are under some moral requirement to attempt to bring children into being . There is only rarely a strict obligation to have children, but more moderate, inclining moral considerations in favour of having children, have a place in our moral world. I begin by considering a large number of arguments in favour and against the possibility of an obligation to have children. Then I examine when (...)
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    Models of Occupational Medicine Practice: An Approach to Understanding Moral Conflict in “Dual Obligation” Doctors. [REVIEW]Jacques Tamin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):499-506.
    In the United Kingdom (UK), ethical guidance for doctors assumes a therapeutic setting and a normal doctor–patient relationship. However, doctors with dual obligations may not always operate on the basis of these assumptions in all aspects of their role. In this paper, the situation of UK occupational physicians is described, and a set of models to characterise their different practices is proposed. The interaction between doctor and worker in each of these models is compared with the normal doctor–patient relationship, focusing (...)
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