23 found
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  1.  20
    Come as you are? Public Reason and Climate Change.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Asbjørn Hauge-Helgestad - 2021 - Res Publica 28 (1):17-32.
    The likely adverse effects of climate change call for political action. In this paper, we argue that the public reason framework—with its insistence on justifiability to all reasonable citizens, in spite of their profound disagreements—despite initial misgivings recommends itself as a framework for debate and decisions pertaining to climate change. We address two possible stumbling blocks: the exclusion of non-anthropocentric points of view, and the controversy over intergenerational justice. We argue that public reason can deal with these problems. Moreover, we (...)
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  2.  17
    Public Reason and Public Health: Can Anti-smoking Policies Be Justified According to a Public Reason Account of Justification?Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2022 - Public Health Ethics 15 (1):104-116.
    Public reason demands that policies are justified to all reasonable citizens. Public health aims at protecting or improving aggregated health outcomes. Since health is not an uncontroversial value, an insurmountable chasm between public reason and public health seems to preclude any viable synthesis between the two outlooks. For any given public health policy, some reasonable citizen seems to have a reason to support ‘no policy’ over ‘some policy’, meaning that the policy cannot be justified to all. The paper first spells (...)
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  3.  3
    Blanket Consent and Trust in the Biobanking Context.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (4):1-11.
    Obtaining human genetic samples is vital for many biobank research purposes, yet, the ethics of obtainment seems to many fraught with difficulties. One key issue is consent: it is by many considered ethically vital that consent must be fully informed (at least ideally speaking) in order to be legitimate. In this paper, we argue for a more liberal approach to consent: a donor need not know all the specifics of future uses of the sample. We argue that blanket consent is (...)
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  4. Safe, Sane, and Consensual—Consent and the Ethics of BDSM.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):265-288.
    The article analyses the role and moral force of consent in BDSM (Sado-masochistic and related practice). The view defended accepts consent as a key feature in sexual morality, and explains in detail the relation between consent and autonomy. In brief, it is argued that consent as a genuine extension of personal autonomy both justifies and draws limits to justifiable BDSM-practices: autonomy-undermining practices cannot be justified by appealing to autonomy. The paper discusses in detail the necessary conditions for consent with an (...)
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  5.  25
    Should We Hold the Obese Responsible?: Some Key Issues.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):443-451.
    It is a common belief that obesity is wholly or partially a question of personal choice and personal responsibility. It is also widely assumed that when individuals are responsible for some unfortunate state of affairs, society bears no burden to compensate them. This article focuses on two conceptualizations of responsibility: backward-looking and forward-looking conceptualizations. When ascertaining responsibility in a backward-looking sense, one has to determine how that state of affairs came into being or where the agent stood in relation to (...)
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  6.  32
    Personal Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):480-499.
    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risk of disease? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility and spell out what it takes, according to each of them, to be responsible for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease. We show that only what we call the causal approach can adequately accommodate widely shared intuitions to the effect that certain causal (...)
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  7.  64
    Luck Egalitarianism, Universal Health Care, and Non-Responsibility-Based Reasons for Responsibilization.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (2):201-216.
    In recent literature, there has been much debate about whether and how luck egalitarianism, given its focus on personal responsibility, can justify universal health care. In this paper we argue that, whether or not this is so, and in fact whether or not egalitarianism should be sensitive to responsibility at all, the question of personal responsibilization for health is not settled. This is the case because whether or not individuals are responsible for their own health condition is not all that (...)
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  8.  30
    The Legal Ethical Backbone of Conscientious Refusal.Christian Munthe & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):59-68.
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  9.  22
    A Conflict Between Representation and Neutrality.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2010 - Philosophical Papers 39 (1):69-96.
    The nub of the following argument is that there is a conflict between the idea of (liberal) neutrality on the one hand, and an intuitively plausible idea of political representation on the other. The conflict arises when neutrality is seen as a condition for political legitimacy: neutralist political representation is only legitimate insofar as the representative does not advance political ideas based on conceptions of the good that are not endorsed by the whole of the (reasonable) polity. However, we often (...)
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  10.  35
    Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-domination vs Non-interference.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Xavier Landes - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):155-163.
    Status inequalities seem to play a fairly big role in creating inequalities in health. This article assumes that there can be good reasons to fight status inequalities in order to reduce inequalities in health. It examines whether the neorepublican ideal of non-dominance does a better job as a theoretical foil for this as compared to a liberal notion of non-interference. The article concludes that there is a prima facie case for incorporating non-dominance into our thinking about public health, but that (...)
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  11.  5
    Limited Neutrality.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2005 - SATS 6 (1):110-127.
  12. Out of harm’s way?Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2004 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 39 (1):49-66.
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  13.  33
    Intra-Family Inequality and Justice.Xavier Landes & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (3):437-466.
    In “The Pecking Order,” Dalton Conley argues that inequalities between siblings are larger than inequalities at the level of the overall society. Our article discusses the normative implications for institutions of this observation. We show that the question of state intervention for curbing intra-family inequality reveals an internal tension within liberalism between autonomy and toleration, which bears on the forms that the intervention of institutions may take. Despite the pros and cons of both commitments, autonomy-based liberalism appears more compatible with (...)
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  14.  22
    The Duty to Recognize Culture.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2012 - Cultura 9 (1):215-234.
    Do we have a “duty to recognize culture”? The aim of this paper is to examine the following question: assuming we have reasons to respect or valuerecognition per se, do we on that background also have reasons to recognize culture? More specifically, does “culture” furnish a particular morally relevant fact with pro tanto force, providing the basis for a duty to recognize culture? The paper first examines the concept of recognition and then proceeds to analyze “the recognition thesis”, a general (...)
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  15.  16
    Do Anti-Discrimination Policies Sometimes Imply (Wrongful) Discrimination?Claus Strue Frederiksen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):107-124.
    To claim that companies should not discriminate on the basis of race, gender or religion seems almost as trivial as stating that they should not use forced labor or dump radioactive waste into the local river. Among other things, non-discrimination seems to imply that companies recognize and respect a range of religious preferences, including allowing religious clothing, e.g., by allowing Muslim women to wear headscarves. However, many companies do not believe that employees generally should be allowed to wear the kind (...)
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  16.  11
    Intra-Family Inequality and Justice—ERRATUM.Xavier Landes & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (3):537-537.
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  17.  12
    Bioethics in Denmark.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):326-333.
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  18.  33
    Do Anti-Discrimination Policies Sometimes Imply (Wrongful) Discrimination?: The (Alleged) Asymmetry between Religious and Secular Clothing.Claus Strue Frederiksen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):107-124.
    To claim that companies should not discriminate on the basis of race, gender or religion seems almost as trivial as stating that they should not use forced labor or dump radioactive waste into the local river. Among other things, non-discrimination seems to imply that companies recognize and respect a range of religious preferences, including allowing religious clothing, e.g., by allowing Muslim women to wear headscarves. However, many companies do not believe that employees generally should be allowed to wear the kind (...)
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  19.  18
    For the Sake of Argument? Do Deliberative Values Mandate Restriction of Freedom of Speech?Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2011 - SATS 12 (1):60-79.
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  20.  6
    For the Sake of Argument? Do Deliberative Values Mandate Restriction of Freedom of Speech?Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2011 - SATS 12 (1):60-79.
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  21.  10
    Liberalism, neutrality, and civil society.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2002 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 37 (1):57.
  22.  4
    The Goal of Sexual Activism: Toleration, Recognition, or Both?Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2023 - Philosophies 8 (4):57.
    Sexual activism (for, e.g., participants in the LGBT+ or BDSM communities) is prima facie commendable, at least for the liberal. However, it is unclear whether the end goal of such activism is toleration or recognition. The argument of this paper is that, on the level of authoritative political and social-moral rules, toleration is the only justifiable goal, while recognition may be pursued as an ideal outside the sphere of political and social-moral rules, that is, in civil society. The argument builds (...)
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  23.  44
    Talking politics.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2007 - The Philosophers' Magazine 37 (37):75-78.
    Do we have a “duty to recognize culture”? The aim of this paper is to examine the following question: assuming we have reasons to respect or valuerecognition per se, do we on that background also have reasons to recognize culture? More specifically, does “culture” furnish a particular morally relevant fact with pro tanto force, providing the basis for a duty to recognize culture? The paper first examines the concept of recognition and then proceeds to analyze “the recognition thesis”, a general (...)
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