15 found
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  1.  26
    Re-engineering shared decision-making.Muriel R. Gillick - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):785-788.
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  2.  60
    Doing the Right Thing: A Geriatrician's Perspective on Medical Care for the Person with Advanced Dementia.Muriel R. Gillick - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):51-56.
    Developing a reasonable approach to the medical care of older people with dementia will be essential in the coming decades. Physicians are the locus of decision making for persons with dementia. It is the responsibility of the physician to assure that the surrogate understands the nature and trajectory of the disease and then to elicit the desired goal of care. Physicians need to ascertain whether any advance directives are available, and if so, whether they apply to the situation of advanced (...)
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  3.  17
    Doing the Right Thing: A Geriatrician's Perspective on Medical Care for the Person with Advanced Dementia.Muriel R. Gillick - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):51-56.
    America is aging. But even more striking than the rise in the proportion of the population over age 65 is the unprecedented number of individuals who are living into their eighties and nineties. While many people remain robust well into advanced age, the dramatic increase in the number of the oldest old has brought with it an epidemic of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Dementia is a highly prevalent condition — currently 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, a number which (...)
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  4.  34
    The Limits of Proxy Decision Making: Undertreatment.Muriel R. Gillick & Terri Fried - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (2):172.
    With the passage by virtually every state legislature of healthcare proxy laws, the medical profession increasingly can expect to rely on the participation of surrogates in making decisions on behalf of incompetent patients. Several concerns about the legitimacy of proxy decision making have been discussed in the ethical and general medical literature: the lack of concordance between the views of patients and their surrogates have been documented on multiple occasions, and cases of abuse by proxies or potential conflict of interest (...)
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  5.  30
    Targeted Chemotherapy, the Medical Ecosystem, and the Future of American Health Care.Muriel R. Gillick - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (2):268-284.
    In light of the central role that medications play in medical progress, the declining rate of new drug development over the past decade is cause for concern . Without important breakthroughs in drug discovery, the future will not be auspicious for the many people suffering from chronic and incurable illnesses. The sluggish pace of pharmaceutical innovation has been particularly characteristic of the largest drug manufacturers, which have generally focused their energies on potential blockbuster medications, those that can generate over $1 (...)
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  6.  7
    An Algorithm for Determining Best Interest?Muriel R. Gillick - 1995 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (1):82-85.
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  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospice : ethically justified or an oxymoron?Muriel R. Gillick - 2014 - In Timothy W. Kirk & Bruce Jennings (eds.), Hospice Ethics: Policy and Practice in Palliative Care. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  5
    Editor's Introduction to the Special Issue.Muriel R. Gillick - 2017 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (4):457-463.
    With great fanfare, the first baby boomer turned 65 on January 1, 2011, ushering in the new, gray society. We—I'm one of the 76 million baby boomers—were expected to transform aging: better educated, healthier, reared in an era of unprecedented prosperity, committed to individual autonomy, we would singlehandedly turn retirement from a time of decline, disability, and despair into a period of travel, adventure, and personal growth. If we did become ill, despite regular exercise, a wholesome diet, and a goodly (...)
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  9.  11
    Merchants of Health: Shaping the Experience of Illness Among Older People.Muriel R. Gillick - 2017 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (4):530-548.
    Modern gerontology has debunked the myth of old age as a period of inevitable decline. But what science has not been able to change is the reality that old age often is a time of illness and disability, particularly for the oldest old—those over age 85. The vaunted compression of morbidity hasn't happened; while the period of decline before death may have shrunk, it hasn't vanished. The trajectory in the last phase of life is rarely a precipice, with older people (...)
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  10.  22
    Shades of Gray.Muriel R. Gillick - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (2):46-47.
  11. The ethics of artificial nutrition and hydration--a practical guide.Muriel R. Gillick - 2006 - Practical Bioethics 2:1-7.
     
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  12.  7
    When Corona Came to Canada: The 2003 SARS Outbreak and Its Aftermath.Muriel R. Gillick - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (1):25-40.
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  13.  42
    Artificial nutrition and hydration in the patient with advanced dementia: is withholding treatment compatible with traditional Judaism?Muriel R. Gillick - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):12-15.
    Several religious traditions are widely believed to advocate the use of life-sustaining treatment in all circumstances. Hence, many believe that these faiths would require the use of a feeding tube in patients with advanced dementia who have lost interest in or the capacity to swallow food. This article explores whether one such tradition—halachic Judaism—in fact demands the use of artificial nutrition and hydration in this setting. Traditional arguments have been advanced holding that treatment can be withheld in persons who are (...)
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  14.  40
    The Limits of Proxy Decision Making: Overtreatment.Terri R. Fried & Muriel R. Gillick - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):524.
    With the passage by virtually every state legislature of healthcare proxy laws, the medical profession increasingly can expect to rely on the participation of surrogates in making decisions on behalf of incompetent patients. Several concerns about the legitimacy of proxy decision making have been discussed in the ethical and general medical literature: the lack of concordance between the views of patients and their surrogates have been documented on multiple occasions, and cases of abuse by proxies or potential conflict of interest (...)
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  15. Access to Health Care or Adequacy of Health. [REVIEW]Muriel R. Gillick - 1983 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 8 (4):46-51.
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