Results for 'Music'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Bibliography: Music in Arts and Humanities
Bibliography: Philosophy of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Definition of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Ontology of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Experience in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Varieties of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Philosophy of Music, Misc in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Ontology, Misc in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Performance in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Works in Aesthetics
...
Other categories were found but are not shown. Use more specific keywords to find others, or browse the categories.
  1. Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing.Barbara Tillmann - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  2. Music and Vague Existence.David Friedell - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):437-449.
    I explain a tension between musical creationism and the view that there is no vague existence. I then suggest ways to reconcile these views. My central conclusion is that, although some versions of musical creationism imply vague existence, others do not. I discuss versions of musical creationism held by Jerrold Levinson, Simon Evnine, and Kit Fine. I also present two new versions. I close by considering whether the tension is merely an instance of a general problem raised by artifacts, both (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3. Music Critics and Aestheticians Are, on the Surface, Advocates and Guardians of Good Music. But What Exactly is “Good”.Pop Music - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. pp. 62.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Defending Musical Perdurantism.Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):59-69.
    If musical works are abstract objects, which cannot enter into causal relations, then how can we refer to musical works or know anything about them? Worse, how can any of our musical experiences be experiences of musical works? It would be nice to be able to sidestep these questions altogether. One way to do that would be to take musical works to be concrete objects. In this paper, we defend a theory according to which musical works are concrete objects. In (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  5. Musicing, Materiality, and the Emotional Niche.Joel Krueger - 2015 - Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 14 (3):43-62.
    Building on Elliot and SilvermanÕs (2015) embodied and enactive approach to musicing, I argue for an extended approach: namely, the idea that music can function as an environmental scaffolding supporting the development of various experiences and embodied practices that would otherwise remain inaccessible. I focus especially on the materiality of music. I argue that one of the central ways we use music, as a material resource, is to manipulate social spaceÑand in so doing, manipulate our emotions. Acts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Enacting Musical Experience.Joel Krueger - 2009 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):98-123.
    I argue for an enactive account of musical experience — that is, the experience of listening ‘deeply’(i.e., sensitively and understandingly) to a piece of music. The guiding question is: what do we do when we listen ‘deeply’to music? I argue that these music listening episodes are, in fact, doings. They are instances of active perceiving, robust sensorimotor engagements with and manipulations of sonic structures within musical pieces. Music is thus experiential art, and in Nietzsche’s words, ‘we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  7. Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration.Stephen Davies - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    What are musical works? Are they discovered or created? Can recordings substitute faithfully for live performances? This book considers these and other intriguing questions. It first outlines the nature of musical works, their relation to performances, and their notational specification; it then considers authenticity in performance, musical traditions, and recordings. Comprehensive and original, the volume discusses many kinds of music, applying its conclusions to issues as diverse as the authentic performance movement, the cultural integrity of ethnic music, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  8. Musical Meaning and Expression.Stephen Davies - 1994 - Cornell University Press.
    But what does music mean, and how does it mean?Stephen Davies addresses these questions in this sophisticated and knowledgeable overview of current theories in ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  9. Sideways Music.Ned Markosian - 2019 - Analysis (1):anz039.
    There is a popular theory in the metaphysics of time according to which time is one of four similar dimensions that make up a single manifold that is appropriately called spacetime. One consequence of this thesis is that changing an object’s orientation in the manifold does not change its intrinsic features. In this paper I offer a new argument against this popular theory. I claim that an especially good performance of a particularly beautiful piece of music, when oriented within (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10. “I Like Bad Music.” That's My Usual Response to People Who Ask Me About My Musi.Rock Critics Need Bad Music - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  19
    Musical Phenomenology: Artistic Traditions and Everyday Experience.Małgorzata A. Szyszkowska - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):141-155.
    The work begins by asking the questions of how contemporary phenomenology is concerned with music, and how phenomenological descriptions of music and musical experiences are helpful in grasping the concreteness of these experiences. I then proceed with minor findings from phenomenological authorities, who seem to somehow need music to explain their phenomenology. From Maurice Merleau-Ponty to Jean-Luc Nancy and back to Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, there are musical findings to be asserted. I propose to look at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Music as Affective Scaffolding.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In David Clarke, Ruth Herbert & Eric Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness II. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    For 4E cognitive science, minds are embodied, embedded, enacted, and extended. Proponents observe that we regularly ‘offload’ our thinking onto body and world: we use gestures and calculators to augment mathematical reasoning, and smartphones and search engines as memory aids. I argue that music is a beyond-the-head resource that affords offloading. Via this offloading, music scaffolds access to new forms of thought, experience, and behaviour. I focus on music’s capacity to scaffold emotional consciousness, including the self-regulative processes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13.  73
    The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It.Philip Ball - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. Music Cognition: A Developmental Perspective.Stephanie M. Stalinski & E. Glenn Schellenberg - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):485-497.
    Although music is universal, there is a great deal of cultural variability in music structures. Nevertheless, some aspects of music processing generalize across cultures, whereas others rely heavily on the listening environment. Here, we discuss the development of musical knowledge, focusing on four themes: (a) capabilities that are present early in development; (b) culture-general and culture-specific aspects of pitch and rhythm processing; (c) age-related changes in pitch perception; and (d) developmental changes in how listeners perceive emotion in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15. Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories.Malcolm Budd - 1985 - Routledge.
    It has often been claimed, and frequently denied, that music derives some or all of its artistic value from the relation in which it stands to the emotions. This book presents and subjects to critical examination the chief theories about the relationship between the art of music and the emotions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  16. Music Practice and Participation for Psychological Well-Being: A Review of How Music Influences Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment.Adam M. Croom - 2015 - Musicae Scientiae: The Journal of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music 19:44-64.
    In “Flourish,” Martin Seligman maintained that the elements of well-being consist of “PERMA: positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment.” Although the question of what constitutes human flourishing or psychological well-being has remained a topic of continued debate among scholars, it has recently been argued in the literature that a paradigmatic or prototypical case of human psychological well-being would largely manifest most or all of the aforementioned PERMA factors. Further, in “A Neuroscientific Perspective on Music Therapy,” Stefan Koelsch also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  94
    Musical Perdurantism and the Problem of Intermittent Existence.Alexey Aliyev - 2017 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 94 (1-2):83-100.
    Recently, a number of philosophers have defended a novel, materialist view on the nature of musical works—musical perdurantism. According to this view, musical works are a peculiar kind of concreta, namely perduring mereological sums of performances and/or other concrete entities. One problem facing musical perdurantism stems from the thought that if this view is correct, then virtually no musical work can exist in a continuous, non-intermittent fashion. The aim of this paper is to expound this problem and show that it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18. Music, Art, and Metaphysics.Jerrold Levinson - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a long-awaited reissue of Jerrold Levinson's 1990 book which gathers together the writings that made him a leading figure in contemporary aesthetics. These highly influential essays are essential reading for debates on the definition of art, the ontology of art, emotional response to art, expression in art, and the nature of art forms.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  19.  98
    Music, Neuroscience, and the Psychology of Well-Being: A Précis.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 2:393.
    In Flourish, the positive psychologist Seligman (2011) identifies five commonly recognized factors that are characteristic of human flourishing or well-being: (1) “positive emotion,” (2) “relationships,” (3) “engagement,” (4) “achievement,” and (5) “meaning” (p. 24). Although there is no settled set of necessary and sufficient conditions neatly circumscribing the bounds of human flourishing (Seligman, 2011), we would mostly likely consider a person that possessed high levels of these five factors as paradigmatic or prototypical of human flourishing. Accordingly, if we wanted to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  20. Emotion and Meaning in Music.Leonard B. Meyer - 1956 - University of Chicago Press.
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  21.  83
    Music Perception and Cognition: A Review of Recent Cross‐Cultural Research. [REVIEW]Catherine J. Stevens - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):653-667.
    Experimental investigations of cross-cultural music perception and cognition reported during the past decade are described. As globalization and Western music homogenize the world musical environment, it is imperative that diverse music and musical contexts are documented. Processes of music perception include grouping and segmentation, statistical learning and sensitivity to tonal and temporal hierarchies, and the development of tonal and temporal expectations. The interplay of auditory, visual, and motor modalities is discussed in light of synchronization and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22. Music, Neuroscience, and the Psychology of Wellbeing: A Précis.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 2 (393):393.
    In Flourish, the positive psychologist Martin Seligman (2011) identifies five commonly recognized factors that are characteristic of human flourishing or wellbeing: (1) “positive emotion,” (2) “relationships,” (3) “engagement,” (4) “achievement,” and (5) “meaning” (p. 24). Although there is no settled set of necessary and sufficient conditions neatly circumscribing the bounds of human flourishing (Seligman, 2011), we would mostly likely consider a person that possessed high levels of these five factors as paradigmatic or prototypical of human flourishing. Accordingly, if we wanted (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23.  36
    Enacting Musical Emotions. Sense-Making, Dynamic Systems, and the Embodied Mind.Andrea Schiavio, Dylan van der Schyff, Julian Cespedes-Guevara & Mark Reybrouck - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):785-809.
    The subject of musical emotions has emerged only recently as a major area of research. While much work in this area offers fascinating insights to musicological research, assumptions about the nature of emotional experience seem to remain committed to appraisal, representations, and a rule-based or information-processing model of cognition. Over the past three decades alternative ‘embodied’ and ‘enactive’ models of mind have challenged this approach by emphasising the self-organising aspects of cognition, often describing it as an ongoing process of dynamic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  24.  37
    Music, the Arts, and Ideas: Patterns and Predictions in Twentieth-Century Culture.Leonard B. Meyer - 1967 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    The Postlude, written for this edition, looks back at the predictions made more than twenty-five years ago and speculates about what the coming decades may hold ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  25. Music, Emotions and the Influence of the Cognitive Sciences.Tom Cochrane - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):978-988.
    This article reviews some of the ways in which philosophical problems concerning music can be informed by approaches from the cognitive sciences (principally psychology and neuroscience). Focusing on the issues of musical expressiveness and the arousal of emotions by music, the key philosophical problems and their alternative solutions are outlined. There is room for optimism that while current experimental data does not always unambiguously satisfy philosophical scrutiny, it can potentially support one theory over another, and in some cases (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  25
    Music Communicates Affects, Not Basic Emotions – A Constructionist Account of Attribution of Emotional Meanings to Music.Julian Cespedes-Guevara & Tuomas Eerola - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Basic Emotion theory has had a tremendous influence on the affective sciences, including music psychology, where most researchers have assumed that music expressivity is constrained to a limited set of basic emotions. Several scholars suggested that these constrains to musical expressivity are explained by the existence of a shared acoustic code to the expression of emotions in music and speech prosody. In this article we advocate for a shift from this focus on basic emotions to a constructionist (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27.  81
    Music and Language in Social Interaction: Synchrony, Antiphony, and Functional Origins.Nathan Oesch - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Music and language are universal human abilities with many apparent similarities relating to their acoustics, structure, and frequent use in social situations. We might therefore expect them to be understood and processed similarly, and indeed an emerging body of research suggests that this is the case. But the focus has historically been on the individual, looking at the passive listener or the isolated speaker or performer, even though social interaction is the primary site of use for both domains. Nonetheless, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. Music and Cognitive Extension.Luke Kersten - 2014 - Empirical Musicology Review 9 (3-4):193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  29.  11
    Musical Works as Ideal Objects.Saulius Geniušas - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (4):231-244.
    In light of recent studies in the phenomenology of music, the essay engages anew in the classical phenomenological controversy over the ideal status of musical works. I argue that musical works are bound idealities. I maintain that the listener’s capacity to apperceive physical sounds as musical melodies, which can be repeatedly and intersubjectively experienced, accounts for the ideality of musical works. Conceived of as bound idealities, musical works 1) are bound to the acts that sustain them; 2) do not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  26
    Musical Training, Bilingualism, and Executive Function: A Closer Look at Task Switching and Dual‐Task Performance.Linda Moradzadeh, Galit Blumenthal & Melody Wiseheart - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (5):992-1020.
    This study investigated whether musical training and bilingualism are associated with enhancements in specific components of executive function, namely, task switching and dual-task performance. Participants belonging to one of four groups were matched on age and socioeconomic status and administered task switching and dual-task paradigms. Results demonstrated reduced global and local switch costs in musicians compared with non-musicians, suggesting that musical training can contribute to increased efficiency in the ability to shift flexibly between mental sets. On dual-task performance, musicians also (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31.  58
    Music in the Moment.Jerrold Levinson - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
    Does aural understanding depend upon reflective awareness of musical architecture or large-scale musical structure? Jerrold Levinson thinks not.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  32. Musical Materialism and the Inheritance Problem.Chris Tillman & J. Spencer - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):252-259.
    Some hold that musical works are fusions of, or coincide with, their performances. But if performances contain wrong notes, won't works inherit that property? We say ‘no’.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33. Music Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience.Peter Kivy - 1990 - Cornell University Press.
    In the Essai sur Vorigine des langues (), Jean-Jacques Rousseau reports on an eighteenth-century curiosity that has, from time to time, fascinated musicians ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  34.  57
    Rethinking Musical Affordances.Damiano Menin & Andrea Schiavio - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (2):202-215.
    The notion of affordance has been introduced by Gibson as the feature of an object or the environment that allows the observer to perform an action, a set of “environmental supports for an organism’s intentional activities”. Studied under very different perspectives, this concept has become a crucial issue not only for the ecological psychology, but also for cognitive sciences, artificial intelligence studies, and philosophy of mind. This variety of approaches has widened the already ambiguous definition originally provided by Gibson, contributing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  35.  77
    Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives.David Clarke & Eric Clarke (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    What is consciousness? Why and when do we have it? Where does it come from, and how does it relate to the lump of squishy grey matter in our heads, or to our material and social worlds? While neuroscientists, philosophers, psychologists, historians, and cultural theorists offer widely different perspectives on these fundamental questions concerning what it is like to be human, most agree that consciousness represents a 'hard problem'. -/- The emergence of consciousness studies as a multidisciplinary discourse addressing these (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36.  53
    Shared Musical Experiences.Brandon Polite - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):429-447.
    In ‘Listening to Music Together’, Nick Zangwill offers three arguments which aim to establish that listening to music can never be a joint activity. If any of these arguments were sound, then our experiences of music, qua object of aesthetic attention, would be essentially private. In this paper, I argue that Zangwill’s arguments are unsound and I develop an account of shared musical experience that defends three main conclusions. First, joint listening is not merely possible but a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Musical Twofoldness.Bence Nanay - 2012 - The Monist 95 (4):607-624.
    The concept of twofoldness plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of pictures. My claim is that it also plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of musical performances. I argue that when we are aesthetically appreciating the performance of a musical work, we are simultaneously attending to both the features of the performed musical work and the features of the token performance we are listening to. This twofold experience explains a number of salient aspects of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  53
    Musical Pluralism and the Science of Music.Adrian Currie & Anton Killin - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (1):9-30.
    The scientific investigation of music requires contributions from a diverse array of disciplines. Given the diverse methodologies, interests and research targets of the disciplines involved, we argue that there is a plurality of legitimate research questions about music, necessitating a focus on integration. In light of this we recommend a pluralistic conception of music—that there is no unitary definition divorced from some discipline, research question or context. This has important implications for how the scientific study of (...) ought to proceed: we show that some definitions are complementary, that is, they reflect different research interests and ought to be retained and, where possible, integrated, while others are antagonistic, they represent real empirical disagreement about music’s nature and how to account for it. We illustrate this in discussion of two related issues: questions about the evolutionary function of music, and questions of the innateness of music. These debates have been, in light of pluralism, misconceived. We suggest that, in both cases, scientists ought to proceed by constructing integrated models which take into account the dynamic interaction between different aspects of music. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  33
    Can Musical Transformations Be Implicitly Learned?Zoltan Dienes & Christopher Longuet-Higgins - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (4):531-558.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  40.  37
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  41. Enacting Musical Content.Joel Krueger - 2011 - In Riccardo Manzotti (ed.), Situated Aesthetics: Art Beyond the Skin. Imprint Academic. pp. 63-85.
    This chapter offers the beginning of an enactive account of auditory experience—particularly the experience of listening sensitively to music. It investigates how sensorimotor regularities grant perceptual access to music qua music. Two specific claims are defended: (1) music manifests experientially as having complex spatial content; (2) sensorimotor regularities constrain this content. Musical content is thus brought to phenomenal presence by bodily exploring structural features of music. We enact musical content.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  42.  94
    Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration.Andrew Kania - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):513-518.
    A review of Stephen Davies's book, Musical Works and Performances.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  43.  87
    Music, Language, and Cognition: And Other Essays in the Aesthetics of Music.Peter Kivy - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    I. History. Mainwaring's Handel : its relation to British aesthetics -- Herbert Spencer and a musical dispute -- II. Opera and film. Handel's operas : the form of feeling and the problem of appreciation -- Anti-semitism in Meistersinger? -- Speech, song, and the transparency of medium : on operatic metaphysics -- III. Performance. On the historically informed performance -- Ars perfecta : toward perfection in musical performance? -- IV. Interpretation. Another go at the meaning of music : Koopman, Davies, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  11
    Music as a Coevolved System for Social Bonding.Patrick E. Savage, Psyche Loui, Bronwyn Tarr, Adena Schachner, Luke Glowacki, Steven Mithen & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:1-36.
    Why do humans make music? Theories of the evolution of musicality have focused mainly on the value of music for specific adaptive contexts such as mate selection, parental care, coalition signaling, and group cohesion. Synthesizing and extending previous proposals, we argue that social bonding is an overarching function that unifies all of these theories, and that musicality enabled social bonding at larger scales than grooming and other bonding mechanisms available in ancestral primate societies. We combine cross-disciplinary evidence from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. Beyond Musical Qualia: Reflecting on the Concept of Experience.Andrea Schiavio & Dylan van der Schyff - 2016 - Psychomusicology 26 (4):366-378.
    In this paper, we take a critical look at the notion of musical qualia. Although different conceptions of qualia are often used by theorists to describe musical experience, there is little consensus as to just what this entails. Broadly speaking, some argue that qualia are best understood as pregiven attributes of the musical environment, whereas others insist that they are products of information processing confined within the boundaries of the skull. We critically examine these positions and consider how they align (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Musicality: Instinct or Acquired Skill?Gary F. Marcus - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):498-512.
  47. Music and Metaphysics.Saam Trivedi - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (1):124–143.
    In this article, I assume that musical works are abstract types, and I raise and address a new question concerning musical ontology that may take the types view at least a step further: When do musical works cease to exist? I then propound my view about musical works as types, which is somewhat like the Aristotelian Realist position concerning universals. Next, I address some objections to that view. Finally, I provide some grounds for rejecting alternative views that see Western classical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  68
    Musical Understandings: And Other Essays on the Philosophy of Music.Stephen Davies - 2011 - New York;Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, I discuss the kinds of understanding expected of and evinced by skilled listeners, performers, analysts, and composers. I confine the discussion to Western, purely instrumental music, mainly with the classical tradition in mind.[1] And I refer primarily to the Anglophone literature of "analytic" philosophy of music. As will become apparent, my concern is with an analysis that maps what are meant to be familiar aspects of musical experience. I investigate the various understandings expected of an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49. Musical Manipulations and the Emotionally Extended Mind.Joel Krueger - 2014 - Empirical Musicology Review 9 (3-4):208-212.
    I respond to Kersten’s criticism in his article “Music and Cognitive Extension” of my approach to the musically extended emotional mind in Krueger (2014). I specify how we manipulate—and in so doing, integrate with—music when, as active listeners, we become part of a musically extended cognitive system. I also indicate how Kersten’s account might be enriched by paying closer attention to the way that music functions as an environmental artifact for emotion regulation.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50. Silent Music.Andrew Kania - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000