Results for 'Music and magic'

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  1. Music Critics and Aestheticians Are, on the Surface, Advocates and Guardians of Good Music. But What Exactly is “Good”.Pop Music - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. pp. 62.
     
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  2. “I Like Bad Music.” That's My Usual Response to People Who Ask Me About My Musi.Rock Critics Need Bad Music - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.
     
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  3. Music, Mysticism, and Magic: A Sourcebook.Joscelyn Godwin - 1987 - Arkana.
     
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  4.  22
    The Magic of Tone and the Art of Music.Dane Rudhyar - 1982 - Distributed in the United States by Random House.
    Communication: Man's Primordial Need ORGANIC LIFE IN THE EARTH'S biosphere requires organisms to relate to other organisms. Human beings are particularly ...
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  5.  10
    The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics.Alexandra Kertz-Welzel - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):77-94.
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  6.  9
    In Dialogue: Response to Alexandra Kertz-Wezel, ?The Magic of Music?Joyce Eastlund Gromko - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):117-120.
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  7.  7
    Response to Alexandra Kertz-Wezel, "The Magic of Music&Quot.Joyce Eastlund Gromko - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):117-120.
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  8. The?Magic? Of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics.Alexandra Kertz-Welzel - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):77-94.
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  9.  15
    Balty (J.C.), Boardman (J.), Et Al. (Edd.) Thesaurus Cultus Et Rituum Antiquorum (ThesCRA). 1. Processions. Sacrifices. Libations. Fumigations. Dedications. Pp. Xxii + 612, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-788-7. 2. Purification. Initiation. Heroization. Apotheosis. Banquet. Dance. Music. Cult Images. Pp. Xxii + 646, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-789-4. 3. Divination. Prayer. Veneration. Hikesia. Asylia. Oath. Malediction. Profanation. Magic. Pp. Xviii + 434, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-790-0. 4. Cult Places. Representations of Cult Places. Pp. Xiv + 485, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-791-7. 5. Personnel of Cult. Cult Instruments. Pp. Xx + 502, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-792-4. 6. Abbreviations. Index of Museums, Collections and Sites. Pp. Xvi + 167. ISBN: 978-0-89236-793-1. Los Angeles: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2005–2006. Cased, Vols 1–5: £125, €180, US$225 Per Volume, Vol. 6: £40, €60, US$90. ISBN for the Set: 978-0-89236-787-. [REVIEW]R. L. Gordon - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):514-517.
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  10.  1
    Gypsy Fetish: Music, Dirt, Magic, and Freedom.Florentina C. Andreescu & Sean P. Quinn - 2014 - Journal for Cultural Research 18 (4):275-290.
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  11.  1
    Novalis and Mathematics: A Study of Friedrich von Hardenberg's Fragments on Mathematics and Its Relation to Magic, Music, Religion, Philosophy, Language and Literature by Martin Dyck. [REVIEW]C. Truesdell - 1961 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 52:606-607.
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  12. Music, Reason, and Politeness: Magic and Witchcraft in the Career of George Fredric Handel.Ian Bostridge - 2000 - In Peter Burke & Brian Harrison (eds.), Civil Histories: Essays Presented to Sir Keith Thomas. Oxford University Press.
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  13. Penelope Gouk, Music, Science and Natural Magic in Seventeenth-Century England. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1999. Pp. XII+308. Isbn 0-300-07383-6. £30.00, $35.00. [REVIEW]Tom Dixon - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Science 33 (3):369-379.
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  14. Music in Renaissance Magic: Toward a Historiography of OthersGary Tomlinson.Steve Eardley - 1994 - Isis 85 (1):147-148.
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  15. Penelope Gouk.Music, Science, and Natural Magic in Seventeenth‐Century England. Xii + 308 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New Haven, Conn./London: Yale University Press, 1999. [REVIEW]Amy Graziano - 2004 - Isis 95 (2):293-293.
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  16. Mystery, Magic, Music and Metaphysics.Bryan W. Monahan - 1971 - Sydney, Tidal Publications.
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  17. Novalis and Mathematics: A Study of Friedrich von Hardenberg's Fragments on Mathematics and Its Relation to Magic, Music, Religion, Philosophy, Language and LiteratureMartin Dyck.C. Truesdell - 1961 - Isis 52 (4):606-607.
  18. Music and Esotericism.Laurence Wuidar (ed.) - 2010 - Brill.
     
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  19.  8
    Literature, Music, and Science in Nineteenth Century Russian Culture: Prince Odoyevskiy’s Quest for a Natural Enharmonic Scale.Dimitri Bayuk - 2002 - Science in Context 15 (2).
    Known today mostly as an author of Romantic short stories and fairy tales for children, Prince Vladimir Odoyevskiy was a distinguished thinker of his time, philosopher and bibliophile. The scope of his interests includes also history of magic arts and alchemy, German Romanticism, Church music. An attempt to understand the peculiarity of eight specific modes used in chants of Russian Orthodox Church led him to his own musical theory based upon well-known writings by Zarlino, Leibniz, Euler, Prony. He (...)
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  20.  4
    The Postmodern in Music.James Wierzbicki - 2011 - Semiotica 2011 (183):283-308.
    “Postmodern” is an elusive concept that embraces a wide range of critical theories and attitudes. To borrow the assessment that the American poet Walt Whitman offered of himself, the concept is large and contains multitudes, various aspects of which often seem to be at odds with one another. Postmodern art likewise contains multitudes; indeed, it would seem that one of postmodern art's chief characteristics is the comfortable integration of apparently contradictory stimuli that, importantly, are sited less in the “work” itself (...)
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  21. La Musique Et la Magie Étude Sur les Origines Popularies de l'Art Musical, Son Influence Et Sa Fonction Dans les Sociétés.J. Combarieu - 1972 - Minkoff Reprints.
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  22.  13
    Oh, That Magic Feeling! Multicultural Human Subjectivity, Community, and Fascism's Footprints.Deborah Bradley - 2009 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 17 (1):56-74.
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  23.  11
    Response to Deborah Bradley, “Oh, That Magic Feeling! Multicultural Human Subjectivity, Community, and Fascism's Footprints”.Marja Heimonen - 2009 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 17 (1):85-89.
  24. Selbstwiderspruch und Synthese. "Der Zauberberg" Thomas Manns als Suche nach deutscher Identität.Dariusz Pakalski - 2014 - Studia Z Historii Filozofii 5 (2):123-134.
    The article is an attempt to treat Thomas Mann’s The Magic Mountain as a novel about Germany. According to its author the spiritual condition of Germany personified by Hans Castorp was established during the history through the collision of the elements of Western and Eastern cultures. The first protest against the West was raised by Martin Luter in his critique that led to the internalization of German life. As a consequence, the culture of the nation was dominated by (...). This domination mirrored the process in which both elements characteristic for both antagonistic spheres, namely arbitrariness and order, were united as in music counterpoint. Thomas Mann’s idea of humanism, being the continuation of Goethe’s and Nietzsche’s postulates, is a project of their synthesis. (shrink)
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  25.  35
    Mozart and Beethoven: The Concept of Love in Their Operas.Irving Singer - 1977 - MIT Press.
    Music, language, and drama come together in opera to make a whole that conveys emotional reality. In this book, Irving Singer develops a new mode for understanding and experiencing the operas of Mozart and Beethoven, approaching them not as a musical technician but as a philosopher concerned with their expressive and mythic elements. Using the distinction between the sensuous and the passionate as framework for his discussion, Singer explores not only the treatment of love in these operas but also (...)
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  26.  52
    Music and Vague Existence.David Friedell - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):437-449.
    I explain a tension between musical creationism and the view that there is no vague existence. I then suggest ways to reconcile these views. My central conclusion is that, although some versions of musical creationism imply vague existence, others do not. I discuss versions of musical creationism held by Jerrold Levinson, Simon Evnine, and Kit Fine. I also present two new versions. I close by considering whether the tension is merely an instance of a general problem raised by artifacts, both (...)
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  27. Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music.Tom Cochrane - 2010 - Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
    This article defends a persona theory of musical expressivity. After briefly summarising the major arguments for this view, it applies persona theory to the issue of whether music can express complex emotions. The expression of jealousy is then discussed by analysis of two examples from Piazzolla and Janacek.
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  28.  37
    Physics and Magic. Disenchanting Nature.Gregor Schiemann - 2007 - In J. Mildorf, U. Seeber & M. Windisch (eds.), Magic, Science, Technology and Literature. Lit.
    A widespread view of the natural sciences holds that their historical development was accompanied by a constantly widening gap between them and magic. Originally closely bound up with magic, the sciences are supposed to have distanced themselves from it in a long-drawn-out process, until they attained their present magic-free form. I would like, in this essay, to discuss some arguments in support of this plausible view. To this end, I shall begin with a definition of magical and (...)
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  29.  33
    Music and Pain.Andreas Dorschel - 2011 - In Jane Fulcher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the New Cultural History of Music. Oxford University Press. pp. 68-79.
    Ancient mythology related music to pain in a twofold way. Pain is the punishment inflicted for producing inferior music: the fate of Marsyas; music is sublimation of pain: the achievement of Orpheus and of Philomela. Both aspects have played defining roles in Western musical culture. Pain’s natural expression is the scream. To be present in music at all, pain needs to be transformed. So even where music expresses pain, at the same time it appeases that (...)
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  30.  65
    Thoughtwriting—in Poetry and Music.Kendall Walton - 2011/2015 - In Kendall L. Walton (ed.), In Other Shoes: Music, Metaphor, Empathy, Existence. Oxford University Press. pp. 54-74.
    Poetry is a literary art, and is often examined alongside the novel, stories, and theater. But poetry, much of it, has more in common with music, in important respects, than with other forms of literature. The emphasis on sound and rhythm in both poetry and music is obvious, but I will explore a very different similarity between them. All or almost all works of literary fiction have narrators—so it is said anyway—characters who, in the world of the fiction, (...)
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  31. Emotional Responses to Music: The Need to Consider Underlying Mechanisms.Patrik N. Juslin & Daniel Västfjäll - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):559-575.
    Research indicates that people value music primarily because of the emotions it evokes. Yet, the notion of musical emotions remains controversial, and researchers have so far been unable to offer a satisfactory account of such emotions. We argue that the study of musical emotions has suffered from a neglect of underlying mechanisms. Specifically, researchers have studied musical emotions without regard to how they were evoked, or have assumed that the emotions must be based on the mechanism for emotion induction, (...)
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  32. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both (...)
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  33.  18
    Magic: The Art of the Impossible.Jason Leddington - 2017 - In David Goldblatt, Lee B. Brown & Stephanie Patridge (eds.), Aesthetics: A Reader in the Philosophy of the Arts. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 373-379.
    An introduction to the philosophical study of theatrical magic.
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  34. Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'.Robin James - 2011 - In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations (...)
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  35. To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance.Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory (6):1-18.
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. (...)
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  36. The Aesthetics of Music.Roger Scruton - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton distinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions of musical organization and musical meaning. Taking on various fashionable theories in the philosophy and theory of music, he presents (...)
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  37. Doing Things with Music.Joel Krueger - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords (...)
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  38. Ethical Issues in the Music Industry Response to Innovation and Piracy.Robert F. Easley - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):163-168.
    The current conflict between the recording industry and a portion of its customers who are involved in illicit copying of music files arose from innovations involving the compression and electronic distribution of files over the internet. This paper briefly describes some of the challenges faced by the recording industry, and examines some of the ethical issues that arise in various industry and consumer responses to the opportunities and threats presented by these innovations. The paper concludes by highlighting the risks (...)
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  39. Music and Cognitive Extension.Luke Kersten - 2015 - Empirical Musicology Review:193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between (...)
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  40.  40
    Wittgenstein, Modern Music, and the Myth of Progress.Eran Guter - 2017 - In Ilkka Niiniluoto & Thomas Wallgren (eds.), On the Human Condition – Essays in Honour of Georg Henrik von Wright’s Centennial Anniversary, Acta Philosophica Fennica vol. 93. Helsinki: Societas Philosophica Fennica. pp. 181-199.
    Georg Henrik von Wright was not only the first interpreter of Wittgenstein, who argued that Spengler’s work had reinforced and helped Wittgenstein to articulate his view of life, but also the first to consider seriously that Wittgenstein’s attitude to his times makes him unique among the great philosophers, that the philosophical problems which Wittgenstein was struggling, indeed his view of the nature of philosophy, were somehow connected with features of our culture or civilization. -/- In this paper I draw inspiration (...)
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  41. Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology.Julian Dodd - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- The type/token theory introduced -- Motivating the type/token theory : repeatability -- Nominalist approaches to the ontology of music -- Musical anti-realism -- The type/token theory elaborated -- Types I : abstract, unstructured, unchanging -- Types introduced and nominalism repelled -- Types as abstracta -- Types as unstructured entities -- Types as fixed and unchanging -- Types II : platonism -- Introduction : eternal existence and timelessness -- Types and properties -- The eternal existence of properties reconsidered (...)
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  42.  29
    The Philosophy of Music: Theme and Variations.Aaron Ridley - unknown
    Ridley's book is both an introduction to philosophy of music generally and an introduction to an individual, pungently flavoured philosophy of music. His arguments are lively and provocative, and to boot, he writes like a dream. This is the kind of book that reminds one why philosophy matters, especially as applied to the things we love most.-Jerrold Levinson, professor of philosophy, University of Maryland This outstanding book provides new and distinctive approaches to the five central topics of musical (...)
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  43.  87
    The Sound of Music, Externalist Style.Luke Kersten & Robert A. Wilson - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (2):139-154.
    Philosophical exploration of individualism and externalism in the cognitive sciences most recently has been focused on general evaluations of these two views (Adams & Aizawa 2008, Rupert 2008, Wilson 2004, Clark 2008). Here we return to broaden an earlier phase of the debate between individualists and externalists about cognition, one that considered in detail particular theories, such as those in developmental psychology (Patterson 1991) and the computational theory of vision (Burge 1986, Segal 1989). Music cognition is an area in (...)
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  44.  90
    Time, Music, and Gardens.John Powell - 2012 - Philosophy and Music Conference.
    This conference paper contests the validity of some traditional concepts of gardens. It introduces the possibility of considering the passage of time in gardens as a musical, rhythmic phenomonen.
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  45.  90
    Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing.Barbara Tillmann - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, (...)
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  46.  69
    Cognition and the Evolution of Music: Pitfalls and Prospects.Henkjan Honing & Annemie Ploeger - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):513-524.
    What was the role of music in the evolutionary history of human beings? We address this question from the point of view that musicality can be defined as a cognitive trait. Although it has been argued that we will never know how cognitive traits evolved (Lewontin, 1998), we argue that we may know the evolution of music by investigating the fundamental cognitive mechanisms of musicality, for example, relative pitch, tonal encoding of pitch, and beat induction. In addition, we (...)
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  47. Emotion and Meaning in Music.Leonard B. Meyer - 1956 - University of Chicago Press.
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
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  48.  19
    Musical Pluralism and the Science of Music.Adrian Currie & Anton Killin - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (1):9-30.
    The scientific investigation of music requires contributions from a diverse array of disciplines. Given the diverse methodologies, interests and research targets of the disciplines involved, we argue that there is a plurality of legitimate research questions about music, necessitating a focus on integration. In light of this we recommend a pluralistic conception of music—that there is no unitary definition divorced from some discipline, research question or context. This has important implications for how the scientific study of (...) ought to proceed: we show that some definitions are complementary, that is, they reflect different research interests and ought to be retained and, where possible, integrated, while others are antagonistic, they represent real empirical disagreement about music’s nature and how to account for it. We illustrate this in discussion of two related issues: questions about the evolutionary function of music, and questions of the innateness of music. These debates have been, in light of pluralism, misconceived. We suggest that, in both cases, scientists ought to proceed by constructing integrated models which take into account the dynamic interaction between different aspects of music. (shrink)
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  49. Introduction to a Philosophy of Music.Peter Kivy - 2002 - Clarendon Press.
    Philosophy of music has flourished in the last thirty years, with great advances made in the understanding of the nature of music and its aesthetics. Peter Kivy has been at the center of this flourishing, and now offers his personal introduction to philosophy of music, a clear and lively explanation of how he sees the most important and interesting philosophical issues relating to music. Anyone interested in music will find this a stimulating introduction to some (...)
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  50.  20
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form (...)
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