Results for 'Mythology'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  26
    Mythologies.Roland Barthes & Annette Lavers - 1973 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):563-564.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   248 citations  
  2.  86
    White Mythologies: Writing History and the West.Robert Young - 2004 - Routledge.
    In the first edition of White Mythologies (1990) Robert Young challenged the status of history, asking whether in this postmodern era we should consider it a Western myth, with an uncertain status. Is it, he asked, possible to write history that avoids the trap of Eurocentrism? Investigating the history of History, from Hegel to Foucault, White Mythologies calls into question traditional accounts of a single 'World History' which leaves aside the 'Third World' as surplus to the narrative of the West. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  3.  72
    Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism.Markus Gabriel - 2009 - Continuum.
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Mythology of the Factive.John Turri - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 2 (1):143-152.
    It’s a cornerstone of epistemology that knowledge requires truth – that is, that knowledge is factive. Allan Hazlett boldly challenges orthodoxy by arguing thatthe ordinary concept of knowledge is not factive. On this basis Hazlett further argues that epistemologists shouldn’t concern themselves with the ordinary concept of knowledge, or knowledge ascriptions and related linguistic phenomena. I argue that either Hazlett is wrong about the ordinary concept of knowledge, or he’s right in a way that leaves epistemologists to carry on exactly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  5. Instrumental Mythology.Mark Schroeder - 2005 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 1 (2):1-13.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  6.  7
    Mythology, Weltanschauung, Symbolic Universe and States of Consciousness.Gert Malan - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7. Mythology of the Given.Ernest Sosa - 1997 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (3):275 - 286.
  8.  33
    Mythological Paradeigma in the Iliad.M. M. Willcock - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (02):141-.
    AN inquiry into the use of paradeigma in the Iliad must begin with Niobe. At 24. 602 Achilles introduces Niobe in order to encourage Priam to have some food. The dead body of the best of Priam's sons has now been placed on the wagon ready for its journey back to Troy. Achilles says , ‘Now let us eat. For even Niobe ate food, and she had lost twelve children. Apollo and Artemis killed them all; they lay nine days in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. Mythologies of Tribal Art.Denis Dutton - unknown
    Forty years ago Roland Barthes defined a mythology as those “falsely obvious” ideas which an age so takes for granted that it is unaware of its own belief. An illustration of what he meant can be seen in his 1957 critique of the photographic exhibition, The Family of Man . Barthes declares that the myth it promotes stresses exoticism, complacently projecting a Babel of human diversity over the globe. From this image of diversity a pluralistic humanism “is magically produced: (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  66
    Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens.G. C. R., Jane E. Harrison & Margaret de G. Verrall - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:218.
  11. Creative Mythology.J. CAMPBELL - 1968
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  55
    Corporate Mythology and Individual Responsibility.John Ladd - 1984 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (1):1-21.
  13.  52
    Mythological Content: A Problem for Milikan's Teleosemantics.Tadeusz W. Zawidzki - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (4):535-538.
    I pose the following dilemma for Millikan's teleological theory of mental content. There is only one way that her theory can avoid Gauker's [(1995) Review of Millikan's White queen psychology and other essays for Alice, Philosophical Psychology, 8, 305-309] charge that it relies on an unexplained notion of mapping or isomorphism between mental state and world. Mental content must be explained in terms of the mapping relation that is required for mental state producing and consuming mechanisms to perform their biologically (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  11
    Mythological Paradeigma in the Iliad.M. Willcock - 1920 - Classical Quarterly 14 (2):141-154.
    AN inquiry into the use of paradeigma in the Iliad must begin with Niobe. At 24. 602 Achilles introduces Niobe in order to encourage Priam to have some food. The dead body of the best of Priam's sons has now been placed on the wagon ready for its journey back to Troy. Achilles says, ‘Now let us eat. For even Niobe ate food, and she had lost twelve children. Apollo and Artemis killed them all; they lay nine days in their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15.  17
    Ethics, Management, and Mythology: Rational Decision Making for Health Service Professionals.Michael Loughlin - 2002 - Radcliffe Medical Press.
    Chapter 1 Who this book is for and who it is not for1 There are already too many books offering solutions to the problems of the health service. ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  16.  23
    Mythological Innovation in the Iliad.Bruce Karl Braswell - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (01):16-.
    The Iliad is rich in references to stories that have only incidental relevance to the main narrative. These digressions, as they are often called, have usually been assumed to reflect a wealth of pre-Homeric legend, some of which must a have been embodied in poetry. The older Analysts tended to explain the digressions in terms of interpolation. Whether regarded as genuinely Homeric or as interpolated these myths were considered as something existing in an external tradition. More recent scholars have been (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  21
    Mythologies and Philosophies of Salvation in the Theistic Traditions of India.Klaus K. Klostermaier - 1984 - Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion/Corporation Canadienne des Sciences Religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
    INTRODUCTION "For the Hindu religion is salvation," Sarvepalli Radha- krishnan once stated quite categorically. Despite differences in detail, he maintained ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Science, Practice and Mythology: A Definition and Examination of the Implications of Scientism in Medicine. [REVIEW]Michael Loughlin, George Lewith & Torkel Falkenberg - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (2):130-145.
    Scientism is a philosophy which purports to define what the world ‘really is’. It adopts what the philosopher Thomas Nagel called ‘an epistemological criterion of reality’, defining what is real as that which can be discovered by certain quite specific methods of investigation. As a consequence all features of experience not revealed by those methods are deemed ‘subjective’ in a way that suggests they are either not real, or lie beyond the scope of meaningful rational inquiry. This devalues capacities that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  19.  11
    Mythology, Poetry and Theology.Alphonso Groenewald - 2006 - Hts Theological Studies 62 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  28
    Greek Mythology: Some New Perspectives.Geoffrey Stephen Kirk - 1972 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 92:74-85.
    A new approach to the ancient world is only too often a wrong approach, unless it is based on some concrete discovery. But I think it fair to talk of newperspectives, at least, in the study of Greek mythology. Certainly the old and familiar ones are no longer adequate. Indeed it is surprising, in the light of fresh intuitions about society, literacy, the pre-Homeric world, and relations with the ancient Near East, that myth—one of the most pervasive aspects of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  17
    The Mythology of Masquerading Animals, or, Bestiality.Wendy Doniger - forthcoming - Social Research.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Classical Hindu Mythology: A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas.Cornelia Dimmitt - 1978 - Temple University Press.
    The Mahapuranas embody the received tradition of Hindu mythology. This anthology contains fresh translations of these myths, only a few of which have ever been available in English before, thus providing a rich new portion of Hindu mythology. The book is organized into six chapters. "Origins" contains myths relating to creation, time, and space. "Seers, Kings and Supernaturals" relates tales of rivers, trees, animals, demons, and men, particularly heroes and sages. Myths about the chief gods are dealt with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  11
    On Multispecies Mythology: A Critique of Animal Anthropology.Matthew C. Watson - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (5):159-172.
    This article argues that the turn to the animal is a return to mythology. By reading multispecies scholarship as narrativization of contemporary mythology, I claim that the field voices anxieties about human futures through figures of animal others. Multispecies ethnography implicitly grapples with an apocalyptic mythos prevailing in the wake of modernity’s seemingly abandoned dreams. I reconsider the cultural function of multispecies research through two moves. First, I read Thom van Dooren’s Theory, Culture & Society article on ‘Authentic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  29
    Language, Mythology and Enlightenment.James Schmidt - 1998 - Social Research 65.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  14
    'White Mythology' Revisited: Derrida and His Critics on Reason and Rhetoric.Bernard Harrison - 1999 - Critical Inquiry 25 (3):505-534.
  26. Modern Mythology: The Case of 'Reactionary Modernism'.David E. Cooper - 1996 - History of the Human Sciences 9 (2):25-37.
  27. The Mythology of Philosophy: Plato’s Republic and the Odyssey of the Soul.Jacob Howland - 2006 - Interpretation 33 (3):219-241.
  28.  15
    Mythology[REVIEW]H. J. R. & Jane Ellen Harrison - 1925 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 45:141.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  12
    Mythologies of the Ancient World.Mircea Eliade & Samuel Noah Kramer - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (2):216.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  23
    Mythology Condensed Pierre Grimal: Dictionnaire de la Mythologie Grecque Et Romaine. Pp. Xxxi + 577. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1951. Paper, 2,400 Fr. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (01):34-36.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  13
    Sumerian Mythology.W. F. Albright & S. N. Kramer - 1944 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 64 (3):146.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  13
    Mythology Condensed.H. J. Rose - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (01):34-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  3
    Mythologies and Philosophies of Salvation in the Theistic Traditions of India.Bruce J. Stewart - 1986 - Philosophy East and West 36 (2):187-189.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  28
    Holy Writ, Mythology, and the Foundations of Francis Bacon's Principle of the Constancy of Matter.Silvia Manzo - 1999 - Early Science and Medicine 4 (2):114-126.
    The exact nature of the relation between science and Scripture in the thought of Francis Bacon is a well-studied but controversial field. In this paper, it is shown that Bacon, though convinced that there exists no enmity between the book of God's wisdom and the book of God's power, usually tries to separate knowledge acquired by reason from knowledge acquired by faith. In his exposition of the principle of the conservation of matter, however, Bacon seems to find himself constrained to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  72
    Which “Key to All Mythologies”* About the Self?—A Note on Where the Illusions of Transcendence Come From and How to Resist Them.Annalisa Coliva - 2013 - In Simon Prosser & Francois Recanati (eds.), Immunity to Error Through Misidentification: New Essays. Cambridge, Regno Unito:
    It is a striking feature of philosophical reflection on the self that it often ends up being revisionary of our commonsensical intuition that it is identical to a living human being with, intrinsically, physical and psychological properties. As is well known, Descartes identified the self with a mental entity, Hume denied the existence of such an entity and Kant reduced it to a transcendental ego—to a mere condition of possibility for experience and thought. In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein followed Kant —or, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  2
    The Mythological Unconscious.Michael Vannoy Adams - 2001 - Spring Publications.
    Preface to the second edition -- Preface to the first edition -- Psycho-mythology : meschugge? -- Dreams and fantasies : manifestations 0f the mythological unconscious -- African-American dreaming and the "lion in the path" : racism and the cultural unconscious -- "Hapless" the Centaur : an archetypal image, amplification, and active imagination -- Pegasus and visionary experience : from the white winged horse to the "flying red horse" -- The bull, the labyrinth, and the Minotaur : from archaeology to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  41
    The Potencies of God(S): Schelling's Philosophy of Mythology.Edward Allen Beach - 1994 - State University of New York Press.
    Explores the metaphysical, epistemological, and hermeneutical theories of Schelling’s final system concerning the nature and meaning of religious mythology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38.  15
    Bioethics and the Mythology of Liberalism.Michael Loughlin - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (4):315-323.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  1
    Asiatic Mythology.J. Hackin - 1933 - Philosophical Review 42:545.
  40. Who Invented the “Copenhagen Interpretation”? A Study in Mythology.Don Howard - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):669-682.
    What is commonly known as the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, regarded as representing a unitary Copenhagen point of view, differs significantly from Bohr's complementarity interpretation, which does not employ wave packet collapse in its account of measurement and does not accord the subjective observer any privileged role in measurement. It is argued that the Copenhagen interpretation is an invention of the mid‐1950s, for which Heisenberg is chiefly responsible, various other physicists and philosophers, including Bohm, Feyerabend, Hanson, and Popper, having (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  41.  5
    Negative Mythology.Shane Chalmers - 2020 - Law and Critique 31 (1):59-72.
    Can mythology be a form of critical theory in the service of right? From the standpoint of an Enlightenment tradition, the answer is no. Mythology is characterised by irrationality, and works to mystify reality, whilst critical theory is set against the irrational, its entire force directed at demystifying reality. In a post-Enlightenment tradition, reason, including critical reason, may take mythological form—indeed, there is identity as much as non-identity between the two forms, a mimetic relationship in which the rational (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  1
    The Mythology of Transgression: Homosexuality as Metaphor.Jamake Highwater - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Jamake Highwater is a master storyteller and one of our most visionary writers, hailed as "an eloquent bard, whose words are fire and glory" (Studs Terkel) and "a writer of exceptional vision and power" (Ana"is Nin). Author of more than thirty volumes of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, Highwater--considered by many to be the intellectual heir of Joseph Campbell--has long been intrigued by how our mythological legacies have served as a foundation of modern civilization. Now, in The Mythology of Transgression, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  27
    How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology.Luc Brisson - 2004 - University of Chicago Press.
    This study explains how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. Luc Brisson argues that philosophy was ironically responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth because it could not be declared true or false and because it was inferior to argumentation, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegorical exegesis. Brisson shows to what degree allegory was employed among philosophers and how it enabled myth to take (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  57
    World-Picture and Mythology.Joachim Schulte - 1988 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):323 – 334.
    Partly by way of contrast with a conception described by Kleist, Wittgenstein's notions of world?picture and mythology are explained and three types of statement playing a particularly important role with respect to our world?picture or pictures distinguished. Problems concerning sentences which contain normative elements are discussed and a test for what to count as a statement giving information about our world?picture is proposed. A mythology in Wittgenstein's sense is characterized as a structured, systematic set of models permitting analogical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  12
    A Political Mythology of World Order.Mitchell Dean - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (5):1-22.
  46.  34
    A Handbook of Greek Mythology.A. D. N. & H. J. Rose - 1929 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 49:124.
  47.  16
    Of Immortal Mythological Beasts: Operationism in Psychology.Christopher D. Green - unknown
    It is practically an article of faith in psychology that in order to do empirical research one must first operationally define one's variables. However, the 'operational attitude', first advocated by the physicist Percy Bridgman in the 1920s, has since been rejected by virtually every serious philosopher of science as unworkable. Furthermore. 'operationism' -- as developed by psychologists in the 1930s and 1940s -- was based on a misunderstanding of Bridgman's intent from the outset. Nevertheless, contemporary textbooks continue to extol the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48. Classical Mythology in Context.Lisa Maurizio - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Classical Mythology in Context encourages students to directly encounter and explore ancient myths and to understand them in broader interpretative contexts. Featuring a modular structure that coincides with the four main components of a classical mythology course--history, theory, comparison, and reception--each chapter is built around one central figure or topic. Classical Mythology in Context provides: A sustained discussion of religious practices and sacred places that offers a key approach to the historical contextualization of Greek myths An introduction (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Socrates’ Mythological Role in Plato’s Theaetetus.Yip-Mei Loh - 2017 - International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 11 (2):343-346.
    Plato, as a poet, employs muthos extensively to express his philosophical dialectical development, so the majority of his dialogues are comprised of muthoi. We cannot separate his muthos from his philosophical thought, since the former has great influence in the latter. So the methodology of this paper is first to discuss the dialogue "Theaetetus" to find out why he compares Socrates to the Greek goddess Artemis; then his concept of Maieutikē will be investigated. At the beginning of Plato’s "Theaetetus", Socrates (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  10
    The Mythological Paintings in the Macellum at Pompeii.Judith M. Barringer - 1994 - Classical Antiquity 13 (2):149-166.
    This article attempts to establish and examine the context of the two remaining mythological paintings in the Macellum, the central market of Pompeii. Panels of Io and Argos and of Penelope and Odysseus grace the interior walls, and while the identification of the Penelope figure has been the subject of debate, she clearly derives from Greek prototypes of Penelope, both material and theatrical. Indeed, scholars suggest that the Io panel and perhaps the Penelope painting as well are copies of Greek (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000