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  1. Detachment.N. A. Nikam - 1953 - Philosophy East and West 3 (2):167-175.
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  2. The Immortality of the Soul.N. A. Nikam - 1951 - Mind 60 (238):257-258.
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  3.  40
    Indian Philosophical Congress.N. A. Nikam - 1950 - Mind 59 (236):529-a-529.
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  4.  27
    Indian Philosophy: A Note on Some Characteristics.N. A. Nikam - 1953 - Review of Metaphysics 6 (4):665 - 678.
    1. Philosophy, or the nature of philosophical knowledge, is defined as darsana, which means "seeing" or "vision." Seeing is, perhaps, the best instance of what we mean by "direct experience"; in this sense, Indian philosophy is "empirical." Its empiricism is, however, an "empiricism without limits." I shall not discuss here whether "seeing," "hearing," etc., are instances of immediate experience, or of mediate knowledge. If we see with the eyes, or through them, it may be argued that seeing and hearing, etc., (...)
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  5.  28
    Prejudice and the Limits of Tolerance.N. A. Nikam - 1963 - World Futures 2 (sup001):48-54.
  6.  23
    The Novelty of Existence.N. A. Nikam - 1966 - World Futures 4 (3):72-77.
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  7.  22
    A Note on the Individual and His Status in Indian Thought.N. A. Nikam - 1952 - Philosophy East and West 2 (3):254-258.
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  8.  5
    The Edicts of AśokaThe Edicts of Asoka.Ludwik Sternbach, N. A. Nikam & Richard McKeon - 1959 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 79 (2):125.
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  9.  10
    Gandhi's Philosophy.The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi.N. A. Nikam - 1954 - Review of Metaphysics 7 (4):668 - 678.
    Mahatma Gandhi's philosophy, which he called "an experiment with truth," was not a philosophy in which he merely interpreted or analysed things for himself. It was an experience, or experiment, in which he changed himself and his environment. In the process, Gandhi re-oriented many traditional ideas of Hindu thought and practice. He said: "I do not claim to have originated any new principle. I have simply tried in my own way to apply eternal truths to our daily life and problem." (...)
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  10.  2
    Paul Weiss on the Gita.N. A. Nikam - 1955 - Philosophy East and West 4 (4):361.
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  11.  2
    Vedanta: Delight of Being.Wilhelm Halbfass & N. A. Nikam - 1972 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 92 (4):576.
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  12.  5
    Paul Weiss on the Gītā.N. A. Nikam - 1955 - Philosophy East and West 4 (4):361-363.
  13.  1
    Quality and Relation.N. A. Nikam - 1938 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 3 (1):56-56.
  14.  1
    The Indian Philosophical Congress Silver Jubilee Commemoration Volume.N. A. Nikam - 1952 - Philosophy East and West 2 (3):264-266.
  15. Gandhi and America's Educational Future: An Inquiry at Southern Illinois University.Wayne A. R. Leys, P. S. S. Rama Rao, K. L. Shrimali & N. A. Nikam - 1969 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    A project of the Gandhi Centennial Committee of Southern Illinois University, the book outlines the basic tenets of Gandhian philosophy as interpreted by Western thinkers, deals with problems of American education, and offers some reflec­tions on what kinds of solutions may be posed by educators, primarily at the university level. The Foreword and Epilogue are by two distinguished Indian educators, _K. L. Shrimali_, Vice-chancellor, and _N. A. Nikam_, former Vice-chancellor, University of Mysore.
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  16. Edicts of Asoka.N. A. Nikam & Richard P. McKeon (eds.) - 1978 - University of Chicago Press.
    "A literary translation which is also easy and pleasing to read."—Ludwik Sternbach, _Journal of the American Oriental Society _.
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  17. Indian Thought and the Philosophic Bases of Responsibility of Man.N. A. Nikam - 1957 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 11 (1):75.
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  18. The Philosophic Bases of Human Rights and Social Order in Indian Social-Ethics.N. A. Nikam - 1958 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 12 (2):133.
     
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