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Ned Hettinger [19]N. Hettinger [1]
  1.  56
    Animal Beauty, Ethics, and Environmental Preservation.Ned Hettinger - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (2):115-134.
    Animal beauty provides a significant aesthetic reason for protecting nature. Worries about aesthetic discrimination and the ugliness of predation might make one think otherwise. Although it has been argued that aesthetic merit is a trivial and morally objectionable basis for action, beauty is an important value and a legitimate basis for differential treatment, especially in the case of animals. While the suffering and death of animals due to predation are important disvalues that must be recognized, predation’s tragic beauty has positive (...)
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  2.  80
    Allen Carlson’s Environmental Aesthetics and the Protection of the Environment.Ned Hettinger - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (1):57-76.
    Evaluation of the contribution that Allen Carlson’s environmental aesthetics can make to environmental protection shows that Carlson’s positive aesthetics, his focus on the functionality of human environments for their proper aesthetic appreciation, and his integration of ethical concern with aesthetic appreciation all provide fruitful, though not unproblematic, avenues for an aesthetic defense of theenvironment.
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  3.  13
    Exotic Species, Naturalisation, and Biological Nativism.N. Hettinger - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (2):193-224.
    Contrary to frequent characterisations, exotic species should not be identified as damaging species, species introduced by humans, or species originating from some other geographical location. Exotics are best characterised ecologically as species that are foreign to an ecological assemblage in the sense that they have not significantly adapted with the biota constituting that assemblage or to the local abiotic conditions. Exotic species become natives when they have ecologically naturalised and when human influence over their presence in an assemblage (if any) (...)
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  4.  18
    Evaluating Positive Aesthetics.Ned Hettinger - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (3):26-41.
    For in all natural things there is something marvelous.1 None of nature’s landscapes are ugly so long as they are wild.2 Positive aesthetics is the idea that all of nature is beautiful.3 The more qualified version supported here claims that nature—to the extent it is not influenced by humans—is specially and predominantly beautiful. Some of the most prominent figures in environmental aesthetics and ethics have defended PA. Holmes Rolston III was an early proponent: The Matterhorn leaves us in awe, but (...)
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  5.  45
    Valuing Predation in Rolston’s Environmental Ethics: Bambi Lovers Versus Tree Huggers.Ned Hettinger - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (1):3-20.
    Without modification, Rolston’s environmental ethics is biased in favor of plants, since he gives them stronger protection than animals. Rolston can avoid this bias by extending his principle protecting plants (the principle of the nonloss of goods) to human interactions with animals. Were he to do so, however, he would risk undermining his acceptance of meat eating and certain types of hunting. I argue,nevertheless, that meat eating and hunting, properly conceived, are compatible with this extended ethics. As the quintessential natural (...)
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  6.  11
    Valuing Predation in Rolston’s Environmental Ethics: Bambi Lovers Versus Tree Huggers.Ned Hettinger - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (1):3-20.
    Without modification, Rolston’s environmental ethics is biased in favor of plants, since he gives them stronger protection than animals. Rolston can avoid this bias by extending his principle protecting plants to human interactions with animals. Were he to do so, however, he would risk undermining his acceptance of meat eating and certain types of hunting. I argue,nevertheless, that meat eating and hunting, properly conceived, are compatible with this extended ethics. As the quintessential natural process, carnivorous predation is rightfully valued and (...)
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  7.  29
    The Problem of Finding a Positive Role for Humans in the Natural World.Ned Hettinger - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):109-123.
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  8.  2
    Age of Man Environmentalism and Respect for an Independent Nature.Ned Hettinger - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-13.
  9.  17
    Book Review:Upstream/Downstream: Issues in Environmental Ethics. Donald Scherer. [REVIEW]Ned Hettinger - 1992 - Ethics 102 (3):677-.
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  10. Environmental Ethics.Ned Hettinger - 1998 - In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press. pp. 159--161.
     
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  11.  21
    Nature as Subject: Human Obligation and Natural Community.Ned Hettinger - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (1):109-112.
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  12.  22
    Nature as Subject: Human Obligation and Natural Community.Ned Hettinger - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (1):109-112.
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  13. Nature as Subject: Human Obligation and Natural Community. [REVIEW]Ned Hettinger - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (1):109-112.
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  14.  22
    Naturalness, Wild-Animal Suffering, and Palmer on Laissez-Faire.Ned Hettinger - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (1):65-84.
    NED HETTINGER | : This essay explores the tension between concern for the suffering of wild animals and concern about massive human influence on nature. It examines Clare Palmer’s animal ethics and its attempt to balance a commitment to the laissez-faire policy of nonintervention in nature with our obligations to animals. The paper contrasts her approach with an alternative defence of this laissez-faire intuition based on a significant and increasingly important environmental value: Respect for an Independent Nature. The paper articulates (...)
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  15.  41
    “The Intrinsic Value of Nature,” The Monist.Ned Hettinger - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (1):99-104.
  16. “The Intrinsic Value of Nature,” The Monist. [REVIEW]Ned Hettinger - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (1):99-104.
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  17.  26
    The Natural and the Artefactual: The Implications of Deep Science and Deep Technology for Environmental Philosophy.Ned Hettinger - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (4):437-440.
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  18.  9
    The Natural and the Artefactual: The Implications of Deep Science and Deep Technology for Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Ned Hettinger - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (4):437-440.
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  19.  10
    The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature.Ned Hettinger - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):237-240.
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  20. Upstream/Downstream: Issues in Environmental Ethics.Ned Hettinger - 1992 - Ethics 102 (3):677-678.
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