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Noritoshi Tanida [11]N. Tanida [1]
  1.  33
    Voluntary Active Euthanasia and the Nurse: A Comparison of Japanese and Australian Nurses.Noritoshi Tanida, Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Tsuguya Fukui, Yasuji Yamazaki & Helga Kuhse - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (3):313-322.
    Although euthanasia has been a pressing ethical and public issue, empirical data are lacking in Japan. We aimed to explore Japanese nurses’ attitudes to patients’ requests for euthanasia and to estimate the proportion of nurses who have taken active steps to hasten death. A postal survey was conducted between October and December 1999 among all nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine, using a self-administered questionnaire based on the one used in a previous survey with Australian nurses in (...)
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  2.  43
    Doctors' and Nurses' Attitudes Towards and Experiences of Voluntary Euthanasia: Survey of Members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Noritoshi Tanida & Yasuji Yamazaki - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):324-330.
    Objective—To demonstrate Japanese doctors' and nurses' attitudes towards and practices of voluntary euthanasia (VE) and to compare their attitudes and practices in this regard. Design—Postal survey, conducted between October and December 1999, using a self-administered questionnaire.Participants—All doctor members and nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Main outcome measure—Doctors' and nurses' attitude towards and practices of VE.Results—We received 366 completed questionnaires from 642 doctors surveyed (response rate, 58%) and 145 from 217 nurses surveyed (68%). A total of 54% (95% (...)
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  3. Death with Dignity is Impossible in Contemporary Japan: Considering Patient Peace of Mind in End-of-Life Care.A. Asai, K. Aizawa, Y. Kadooka & N. Tanida - 2012 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 22 (2):49-52.
    Currently in Japan, it is extremely difficult to realize the basic wish of protecting personal dignity at the end of life. A patient’s right to refuse life-sustaining treatment has not been substantially warranted, and advance directives have not been legally enforceable. Unfortunately, it is not until the patient is moribund that all concerned parties start to deliberate on whether or not death with dignity should be pursued. Medical intervention is often perceived as a worthwhile goal to not only preserve life, (...)
     
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  4.  59
    ‘Bioethics’is Subordinate to Morality in Japan.Noritoshi Tanida - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (3):201–211.
    Disputes over brain death and euthanasia are used to illuminate the question whether there really is a Japanese way of thinking in bioethics. In Japanese thought, a person does not exist as an individual but as a member of the family, community or society. I describe these features of Japanese society as ‘mutual dependency’. In this society, an act is ‘good’ and ‘right’ when it is commonly done, and it is ‘bad’ and ‘wrong’ when nobody else does it. Thus, outsiders (...)
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  5.  19
    ‘Bioethics’ is Subordinate to Morality in Japan.Noritoshi Tanida - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (3):201-211.
    Disputes over brain death and euthanasia are used to illuminate the question whether there really is a Japanese way of thinking in bioethics. In Japanese thought, a person does not exist as an individual but as a member of the family, community or society. I describe these features of Japanese society as ‘mutual dependency’. In this society, an act is ‘good’ and ‘right’ when it is commonly done, and it is ‘bad’ and ‘wrong’ when nobody else does it. Thus, outsiders (...)
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  6.  5
    Euthanasia and the Family: An Analysis of Japanese Doctors’ Reactions to Demands for Voluntary Euthanasia.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Akemi Kariya, Shizuko K. Nagata, Tsuguya Fukui, Noritoshi Tanida, Yasuji Yamazaki & Helga Kuhse - 2001 - Monash Bioethics Review 20 (3):21-37.
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  7. Difference in Ethical Views Among First-Year to Sixth-Year Students in a Medical School.Noritoshi Tanida, Masumi Ueda & Susumu Hoshino - 2006 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 16 (3):91-93.
    Ethical views of the first-year to sixth-year medical students were studied during bioethics education via questionnaire in 2004. Questions included “would you treat a mentally ill man condemned to death to fit him for execution?”, “is a criminal law suit against a surgeon responsible for a patient's death reasonable?” and “should a surgeon responsible for a patient's death be prosecuted for manslaughter.” The number of students answered “yes, to treat a mentally ill man” tended to increase as they moved up (...)
     
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  8. Indian People Can Emotionally Stand the Truth of Cancer, a Commentary on the Study by Ranjan and Dua.Noritoshi Tanida - 2000 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 10 (5):151-151.
     
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  9. Japanese Attitudes Toward Euthanasia In Hypothetical Clinical Situations.Noritoshi Tanida - 1998 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 8 (5):138-141.
    A questionnaire survey was conducted at the annual meeting of the Japanese Society for Hospice and Home Care to study attitudes toward euthanasia. Respondents were asked how they agreed with the doctor's decision regarding several forms of euthanasia in hypothetical clinical situations dealing with terminal and non-terminal patients. Their acceptance of euthanasia was correlated with respect to patient's autonomy. Results showed 54% and 62% of respondents agreed with voluntary and non-voluntary passive euthanasia at the terminal stage, respectively. Indirect euthanasia was (...)
     
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  10. Japanese Religious Organizations' View on Terminal Care.Noritoshi Tanida - 2000 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 10 (2):34-36.
    Religion may be an influential factor for care of terminally ill patients. Since there was no information of how Japanese religions thought of terminal care, a questionnaire survey was conducted among a total of 388 religious corporations, including 143 Shinto, 157 Buddhist, 58 Christian and 30 miscellaneous religious groups. Respondents were asked to answer questions based on their religious faith regarding a living will, and the introduction or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments at the terminal stage. Results showed that Japanese religions (...)
     
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  11. Medicalization; for a Sense of Peace or for a Sake of Profit with Special Reference to Feeding Through Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.Noritoshi Tanida - 2010 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 20 (5):138-139.
     
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  12. The Social Acceptance Of Euthanasia Does Not Stem From Patient's Autonomy In Japan.Noritoshi Tanida - 1997 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (2):43-46.
    Attitudes towards euthanasia and death-with-dignity of people who participated in the seminar on "life" were studied with questionnaires before and after a lecture regarding these issues. The results indicated that the number of the participants who accepted patient's autonomy increased after the lecture. However, the respondents who accepted the idea of patient's autonomy were less likely to accept euthanasia in general or wish for it in their own case. These data suggest that in this Japanese group, the acceptance of euthanasia (...)
     
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