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  1.  42
    Is Consent Based on Trust Morally Inferior to Consent Based on Information?Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm & Klemens Kappel - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (6):432-442.
    Informed consent is considered by many to be a moral imperative in medical research. However, it is increasingly acknowledged that in many actual instances of consent to participation in medical research, participants do not employ the provided information in their decision to consent, but rather consent based on the trust they hold in the researcher or research enterprise. In this article we explore whether trust-based consent is morally inferior to information-based consent. We analyse the moral values essential to valid consent (...)
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  2.  1
    Blanket Consent and Trust in the Biobanking Context.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Obtaining human genetic samples is vital for many biobank research purposes, yet, the ethics of obtainment seems to many fraught with difficulties. One key issue is consent: it is by many considered ethically vital that consent must be fully informed in order to be legitimate. In this paper, we argue for a more liberal approach to consent: a donor need not know all the specifics of future uses of the sample. We argue that blanket consent is ethically defensible, and that (...)
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    “I Didn’T Have Anything to Decide, I Wanted to Help My Kids”—An Interview-Based Study of Consent Procedures for Sampling Human Biological Material for Genetic Research in Rural Pakistan.Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):113-127.
    Background: Individual, comprehensive, and written informed consent is broadly considered an ethical obligation in research involving the sampling of human material. In developing countries, however, local conditions, such as widespread illiteracy, low levels of education, and hierarchical social structures, complicate compliance with these standards. As a result, researchers may modify the consent process to secure participation. To evaluate the ethical status of such modified consent strategies it is necessary to assess the extent to which local practices accord with the values (...)
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