Results for 'Nancy Bouchard'

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  1.  17
    Ethics Education Seen Through the Lens of Habermas’s Conception of Practical Reason: The Québec Education Program.Nancy Bouchard & Ronald W. Morris - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (2):171-187.
    This paper examines the Québec Education Program (QEP), particularly the new course in ethics and religious culture (ERC), in the light of Habermas?s conception of the moral and ethical uses of practical reason. Habermas?s discursive theory of morality is used to assess the program?s understanding of what it means to be competent in moral matters. Specifically, the paper considers whether or not the program limits the exercise of practical reason to its purely pragmatic form, and the extent to which the (...)
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  2.  27
    A Narrative Approach to Moral Experience Using Dramatic Play and Writing.Nancy Bouchard - 2002 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):407-422.
    In this article, I propose a narrative approach to moral experience through dramatic play and writing. Inspired by the narrative approach to moral conflicts recommended by Mark B. Tappan and Lyn Mikel Brown and by the Que?bec drama programme, this approach works with multiple dimensions of the students' lives and give them a chance to benefit from their own moral experience. This approach to moral education is based on action research conducted in secondary moral education classes in Que?bec (Canada) and (...)
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  3.  12
    Advanced Mathematical Reasoning Ability: A Behavioral Genetic Perspective.Thomas J. Bouchard & Nancy L. Segal - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):191-192.
  4.  27
    Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, 2005.Richard K. Emmerson, Barbara A. Shailor, Susan Mosher Stuard, Madeline H. Caviness, Edward Peters, Thomas J. Heffernan, Constance Brittain Bouchard, Lawrence M. Clopper, Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Bruce W. Holsinger, Carol Symes, Paul Edward Dutton, David N. Klausner, Nancy van Deusen, William Chester Jordan & Vickie Ziegler - 2005 - Speculum 80 (3):1022-1034.
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  5.  19
    Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, 2004.Richard K. Emmerson, Barbara A. Shailor, Susan Mosher Stuard, Madeline H. Caviness, Thomas J. Heffernan, Bernard McGinn, Constance Brittain Bouchard, Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Kathryn L. Lynch, Paul Dutton, Bruce Holsinger, Marcia Kupfer, David Klausner, Nancy van Deusen, William Chester Jordan & Vickie Ziegler - 2004 - Speculum 79 (3):871-882.
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  6.  74
    The Voice of Exile: Feminist Literary History and the Anonymous Anglo-Saxon Elegy.Marilynn Desmond - 1990 - Critical Inquiry 16 (3):572-590.
    In order to recuperate these two representatives of medieval frauenlieder, The Wife’s Lament and Wulf and Eadwacer, a feminist poetics must acknowledge the medieval attitudes toward authority and authorship that allow the medievalist to privilege the voice of the text over the historical author or implied author. The modern concept of authorship, derived from a modern concept of the text as private property, valorizes the signature of the author and the author’s presumed control over and legal responsibility for his or (...)
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  7.  2
    From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality.Frédéric Bouchard & Philippe Huneman (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature’s paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together—as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis—new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
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  8.  12
    Liberalism and the Moral Life.Nancy L. Rosenblum (ed.) - 1989 - Harvard University Press.
    Introduction [Nancy L. Rosenblum] I. Varieties of Liberalism Today 1. The Liberalism of Fear [Judith N. Shklar] 2. Humanist Liberalism [Susan Moller Okin] 3. Liberal Democracy and the Costs of Consent [Benjamin R. Barber] II. Education and the Moral Life 4. Undemocratic Education [Amy Gutmann] 5. Civic Education in the Liberal State [William Galston] III. Moral Conflict 6. Class Conflict and Constitutionalism in J. S. Mill’s Thought [Richard Ashcraft] 7. Making Sense of Moral Conflict [Steven Lukes] 8. Liberal Dialogue (...)
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  9.  70
    Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics.Nancy Cartwright (ed.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Hunting Causes and Using Them argues that causation is not one thing, as commonly assumed, but many. There is a huge variety of causal relations, each with different characterizing features, different methods for discovery and different uses to which it can be put. In this collection of new and previously published essays, Nancy Cartwright provides a critical survey of philosophical and economic literature on causality, with a special focus on the currently fashionable Bayes-nets and invariance methods - and it (...)
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  10. Chapter One Reframing Justice in a Globalising World Nancy Fraser.Nancy Fraser - 2007 - In Julie Connolly, Michael Leach & Lucas Walsh (eds.), Recognition in Politics: Theory, Policy and Practice. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 16.
     
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  11. How the Laws of Physics Lie.Nancy Cartwright - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
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  12. The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science.Nancy Cartwright - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    It is often supposed that the spectacular successes of our modern mathematical sciences support a lofty vision of a world completely ordered by one single elegant theory. In this book Nancy Cartwright argues to the contrary. When we draw our image of the world from the way modern science works - as empiricism teaches us we should - we end up with a world where some features are precisely ordered, others are given to rough regularity and still others behave (...)
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  13. Can the Aim of Belief Ground Epistemic Normativity?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3181-3198.
    For many epistemologists and normativity theorists, epistemic norms necessarily entail normative reasons. Why or in virtue of what do epistemic norms have this necessary normative authority? According to what I call epistemic constitutivism, it is ultimately because belief constitutively aims at truth. In this paper, I examine various versions of the aim of belief thesis and argue that none of them can plausibly ground the normative authority of epistemic norms. I conclude that epistemic constitutivism is not a promising strategy for (...)
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  14.  24
    Vaccine Ethics: An Ethical Framework for Global Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines.Nancy S. Jecker, Aaron G. Wightman & Douglas S. Diekema - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):308-317.
    This paper addresses the just distribution of vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus and sets forth an ethical framework that prioritises frontline and essential workers, people at high risk of severe disease or death, and people at high risk of infection. Section I makes the case that vaccine distribution should occur at a global level in order to accelerate development and fair, efficient vaccine allocation. Section II puts forth ethical values to guide vaccine distribution including helping people with the greatest need, (...)
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  15. Evidence-Based Policy: What’s to Be Done About Relevance?: For the 2008 Oberlin Philosophy Colloquium. [REVIEW]Nancy Cartwright - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 143 (1):127 - 136.
    How can philosophy of science be of more practical use? One thing we can do is provide practicable advice about how to determine when one empirical claim is relevant to the truth of another; i.e., about evidential relevance. This matters especially for evidence-based policy, where advice is thin—and misleading—about how to tell what counts as evidence for policy effectiveness. This paper argues that good efficacy results, which are all the rage now, are only a very small part of the story. (...)
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  16. Epistemic Instrumentalism and the Too Few Reasons Objection.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):337-355.
    According to epistemic instrumentalism, epistemic normativity arises from and depends on facts about our ends. On that view, a consideration C is an epistemic reason for a subject S to Φ only if Φ-ing would promote an end that S has. However, according to the Too Few Epistemic Reasons objection, this cannot be correct since there are cases in which, intuitively, C is an epistemic reason for S to Φ even though Φ-ing would not promote any of S’s ends. After (...)
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  17.  34
    Nancy Mitford on Ireland.Nancy Mitford - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):243-244.
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  18. Is Epistemic Normativity Value-Based?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (3):407-430.
    What is the source of epistemic normativity? In virtue of what do epistemic norms have categorical normative authority? According to epistemic teleologism, epistemic normativity comes from value. Epistemic norms have categorical authority because conforming to them is necessarily good in some relevant sense. In this article, I argue that epistemic teleologism should be rejected. The problem, I argue, is that there is no relevant sense in which it is always good to believe in accordance with epistemic norms, including in cases (...)
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  19. Ceteris Paribus Laws and Socio-Economic Machines.Nancy Cartwright - 1995 - The Monist 78 (3):276-294.
    Economics differs from physics, we are told, in that the laws economics studies hold only ceteris paribus whereas those of physics are supposed to obtain universally and without condition. Does this point to a metaphysical difference between the laws the two disciplines study or does it reflect merely a deficiency in the level of accomplishment of economics as compared to physics?
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  20. Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement.Nancy Cartwright - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    Ever since David Hume, empiricists have barred powers and capacities from nature. In this book Cartwright argues that capacities are essential in our scientific world, and, contrary to empiricist orthodoxy, that they can meet sufficiently strict demands for testability. Econometrics is one discipline where probabilities are used to measure causal capacities, and the technology of modern physics provides several examples of testing capacities (such as lasers). Cartwright concludes by applying the lessons of the book about capacities and probabilities to the (...)
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  21.  8
    Unruly Practices : Power, Discourse, and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory.Nancy Fraser - 1989 - University of Minnesota Press..
    Unruly Practices brings together a series of widely discussed essays in feminism and social theory. Read together, they constitute a sustained critical encounter with leading European and American approaches to social theory. In addition, Nancy Fraser develops a new and original socialist-feminist critical theory that overcomes many of the limitations of current alternatives. First, in a series of critical essays, she deploys philosophical and literary techniques to assess the work of Michael Foucault, the French deconstructionists, Richard Rorty, and Jürgen (...)
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  22.  80
    Ecosystem Evolution is About Variation and Persistence, Not Populations and Reproduction.Frédéric Bouchard - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (4):382-391.
    Building upon a non-standard understanding of evolutionary process focusing on variation and persistence, I will argue that communities and ecosystems can evolve by natural selection as emergent individuals. Evolutionary biology has relied ever increasingly on the modeling of population dynamics. Most have taken for granted that we all agree on what is a population. Recent work has reexamined this perceived consensus. I will argue that there are good reasons to restrict the term “population” to collections of monophyletically related replicators and (...)
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  23.  12
    Nancy Dubler Replies.Nancy Dubler - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):8-8.
  24. Feminist Interpretations of Plato.Nancy Tuana (ed.) - 1994 - Penn State Press.
    The essays in this anthology explore the full spectrum of Plato's philosophy and are representative of the variety of perspectives within feminist criticism.
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  25.  90
    Taking Responsibility for Our Emotions.Nancy Sherman - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):294.
    We often hold people morally responsible for their emotions. We praise individuals for their compassion, think less of them for their ingratitude or hatred, reproach self-righteousness and unjust anger. In the cases I have in mind, the ascriptions of responsibility are not simply for offensive behaviors or actions which may accompany the emotions, but for the emotions themselves as motives or states of mind. We praise and blame people for what they feel and not just for how they act. In (...)
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  26.  31
    Nancy Sherman: Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. [REVIEW]Nancy E. Snow - 1999 - Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (1):127-130.
  27.  76
    Understanding Colonial Traits Using Symbiosis Research and Ecosystem Ecology.Frédéric Bouchard - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):240-246.
    E. O. Wilson (1974: 54) describes the problem that social organisms pose: “On what bases do we distinguish the extremely modified members of an invertebrate colony from the organs of a metazoan animal?” This framing of the issue has inspired many to look more closely at how groups of organisms form and behave as emergent individuals. The possible existence of “superorganisms” test our best intuitions about what can count and act as genuine biological individuals and how we should study them. (...)
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  28. Scales of Justice: Reimagining Political Space in a Globalizing World.Nancy Fraser - 2009 - Columbia University Press.
    Targeting injustices that cut across borders, they are making the scale of justice an object of explicit struggle.Inspired by these efforts, Nancy Fraser asks: ...
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  29.  77
    Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue.Nancy Sherman - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first to offer a detailed analysis of Aristotelian and Kantian ethics together, in a way that remains faithful to the texts and responsive to debates in contemporary ethics. Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that re-assessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves (...)
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  30.  17
    An Interview with Nancy Carpentier Brown.Nancy Carpentier Brown & Sean P. Dailey - 2016 - The Chesterton Review 42 (1/2):201-205.
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  31.  76
    Knowledge, Reasons, and Errors About Error Theory.Charles Cote-Bouchard & Clayton Littlejohn - 2018 - In Robin McKenna & Christos Kyriacou (eds.), Metaepistemology: Realism & Antirealism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    According to moral error theorists, moral claims necessarily represent categorically or robustly normative facts. But since there are no such facts, moral thought and discourse are systematically mistaken. One widely discussed objection to the moral error theory is that it cannot be true because it leads to an epistemic error theory. We argue that this objection is mistaken. Objectors may be right that the epistemic error theory is untenable. We also agree with epistemic realists that our epistemological claims are not (...)
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  32. Redistribution or Recognition? A Political-Philosophical Exchange.Nancy Fraser (ed.) - 2003 - Verso.
    This volume stages a debate between two philosophers, one North American, the other German, who hold different views of the relation of redistribution to ...
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  33.  59
    A Persistence Enhancing Propensity Account of Ecological Function to Explain Ecosystem Evolution.Antoine C. Dussault & Frédéric Bouchard - 2017 - Synthese 194 (4).
    We argue that ecology in general and biodiversity and ecosystem function research in particular need an understanding of functions which is both ahistorical and evolutionarily grounded. A natural candidate in this context is Bigelow and Pargetter’s evolutionary forward-looking account which, like the causal role account, assigns functions to parts of integrated systems regardless of their past history, but supplements this with an evolutionary dimension that relates functions to their bearers’ ability to thrive and perpetuate themselves. While Bigelow and Pargetter’s account (...)
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  34.  93
    Belief's Own Metaethics? A Case Against Epistemic Normativity.Charles Cote-Bouchard - 2017 - Dissertation, King's College London
    Epistemology is widely seen as a normative discipline like ethics. Just like moral facts, epistemic facts – i.e. facts about our beliefs’ epistemic justification, rationality, reasonableness, correctness, warrant, and the like – are standardly viewed as normative facts. Yet, whereas many philosophers have rejected the existence of moral facts, few have raised similar doubts about the existence of epistemic facts. In recent years however, several metaethicists and epistemologists have rejected this Janus-faced or dual stance towards the existence of moral and (...)
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  35.  33
    Feminist Interpretations of Jacques Derrida.Nancy Holland (ed.) - 1997 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Much contemporary feminist theory continues to see itself as freeing women from patriarchal oppression so that they may realize their own inner truth. To be told by postmodern thinkers such as Jacques Derrida that the very possibility of such a truth must be submitted to the process of deconstruction thus seems to present a serious challenge to the feminist project. From a postmodern perspective, on the other hand, most feminist discourse remains deeply rooted, if not in essentialism, at least in (...)
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  36.  9
    Evidence-Based Policy: Where is Our Theory of Evidence?Nancy Cartwright - unknown
    This paper critically analyses the concept of evidence in evidence-based-policy arguing that there is key problem: that there is no existing practicable theory of evidence, one which is philosophically grounded and yet applicable for evidencebased policy. The paper critically considers both philosophical accounts of evidence and practical treatments of evidence in evidence-based-policy. It argues that both fail in different ways to provide a theory of evidence that is adequate for evidence-basedpolicy. The paper is a valuable contribution to the part of (...)
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  37. Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the "Postsocialist" Condition.Nancy Fraser - 1996 - Routledge.
    What does it mean to think critically about politics at a time when inequality is increasing worldwide, when struggles for the recognition of difference are eclipsing struggles for social equality, and when we lack any credible vision of an alternative to the present order? Philosopher Nancy Fraser claims that the key is to overcome the false oppositions of "postsocialist" commonsense. Refuting the view that we must choose between "the politics of recognition" and the "politics of redistribution," Fraser argues for (...)
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  38.  47
    Corpus.Jean-Luc Nancy - 2008 - Fordham University Press.
    The last and most poignant of these essays is The Intruder, Nancys philosophical meditation on his heart transplant.
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  39.  83
    Virtue as Social Intelligence: An Empirically Grounded Theory.Nancy E. Snow (ed.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    Introduction -- In search of global traits -- Habitual virtuous actions and automaticity -- Social intelligence and why it matters -- Virtue as social intelligence -- Philosophical situationism revisited -- Conclusion.
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  40.  83
    Being Singular Plural.Jean-Luc Nancy - 2000 - Stanford University Press.
    One of the strongest strands in Nancy's philosophy is an attempt to rethink community and the very idea of the social in a way that does not ground these ideas in some individual subject or subjectivity. The fundamental argument of this book is that being is always 'being with', that 'I' is not prior to 'we', that existence is essentially co-existence. He thinks this being together, not as a comfortable enclosure in a pre-existing group, but as a mutual abandonment (...)
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  41.  67
    Otto Neurath: Philosophy Between Science and Politics.Nancy Cartwright, Jordi Cat, Lola Fleck & Thomas E. Uebel (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    An international team of four authors, led by distinguished philosopher of science, Nancy Cartwright, and leading scholar of the Vienna Circle, Thomas E. Uebel, have produced this lucid and elegant study of a much-neglected figure. The book, which depicts Neurath's science in the political, economic and intellectual milieu in which it was practised, is divided into three sections: Neurath's biographical background and the socio-political context of his economic ideas; the development of his theory of science; and his legacy as (...)
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  42. Race and Epistemologies of Ignorance.Shannon Sullivan & Nancy Tuana (eds.) - 2007 - State Univ of New York Pr.
    Leading scholars explore how different forms of ignorance are produced and sustained, and the role they play in knowledge practices.
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  43.  67
    The Fate of a Warrior Culture: Nancy Sherman on Jonathan Lear’s Radical Hope.Nancy Sherman - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (1):71 - 80.
    Jonathan Lear in Radical Hope tackles the idea of cultural devastation, in the specific case of the Crow Indians. What do we mean by “annihilation” of a culture? The moral point of view that he imagines as he reconstructs the eve and aftermath of this annihilation is not second personal, of obligation, but first personal, in the collective and singular, as told by the Crows, with Lear as “analyst.” Radical Hope is a study of representative character of a people—of virtue, (...)
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  44.  31
    Symposium on Nancy J. Hirschmann's The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom: Introduction.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):178-181.
  45.  7
    Consent Forms and the Therapeutic Misconception.Nancy M. P. King, Gail E. Henderson, Larry R. Churchill, Arlene M. Davis, Sara Chandros Hull, Daniel K. Nelson, P. Christy Parham-Vetter, Barbra Bluestone Rothschild, Michele M. Easter & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2005 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (1):1-7.
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  46. L'"Il y a" du Rapport Sexuel.Jean-luc Nancy - 2001 - Galilée.
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  47.  40
    Fitness (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).A. Rosenberg & F. Bouchard - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Web 17 (8):457-473.
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  48.  45
    Simone de Beauvoir. Philosophy, and Feminism.Nancy Bauer - 2001 - Columbia University Press.
    " Nancy Bauer begins her book by asking: "Then what kind of a problem does being a woman pose?
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  49. What Are Randomised Controlled Trials Good For?Nancy Cartwright - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (1):59 - 70.
    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely taken as the gold standard for establishing causal conclusions. Ideally conducted they ensure that the treatment ‘causes’ the outcome—in the experiment. But where else? This is the venerable question of external validity. I point out that the question comes in two importantly different forms: Is the specific causal conclusion warranted by the experiment true in a target situation? What will be the result of implementing the treatment there? This paper explains how the probabilistic theory (...)
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  50.  6
    Reclaiming Relationality Through the Logic of the Gift and Vulnerability.Laurie Gagnon-Bouchard & Camille Ranger - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):41-57.
    This article addresses the conditions that are necessary for non-Indigenous people to learn from Indigenous people, more specifically from women and feminists. As non-Indigenous scholars, we first explore the challenges of epistemic dialogue through the example of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. From there, through the concept of mastery, we examine the social and ontological conditions under which settler subjectivities develop. As demonstrated by Julietta Singh and Val Plumwood, the logic of mastery—which has legitimated the oppression and exploitation of Indigenous peoples—has been (...)
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