Results for 'Nanotechnology'

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  1.  53
    On Nanotechnology and Ambivalence: The Politics of Enthusiasm. [REVIEW]Matthew Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):131-142.
    The promise of scientific and technological innovation – particularly in fields such as nanotechnology – is increasingly set against what has been articulated as a deficit in public trust in both the new technologies and regulatory mechanisms. Whilst the development of new technology is cast as providing contributions to both quality of life and national competitiveness, what has been termed a ‘legitimacy crisis’ is seen as threatening the vitality of this process. However in contrast to the risk debates that (...)
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  2.  21
    Nanotechnology, Governance, and Public Deliberation: What Role for the Social Sciences?Phil Macnaghten, , Matthew B. Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2005 - Science Communication 27 (2):268-291.
    In this article we argue that nanotechnology represents an extraordinary opportunity to build in a robust role for the social sciences in a technology that remains at an early, and hence undetermined, stage of development. We examine policy dynamics in both the United States and United Kingdom aimed at both opening up, and closing down, the role of the social sciences in nanotechnologies. We then set out a prospective agenda for the social sciences and its potential in the future (...)
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  3.  57
    Nanotechnology — a New Field of Ethical Inquiry?Armin Grunwald - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):187-201.
    Parallel to the public discussion on the benefits and risks of nanotechnology, a debate on the ethics of nanotechnology has begun. It has been postulated that a new “nano-ethics” is necessary. In this debate, the — positive as well as negative — visionary and speculative innovations which are brought into connection with nanotechnology stand in the foreground. In this contribution, an attempt is made to discover new ethical aspects of nanotechnology in a more systematic manner than (...)
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  4. Nanotechnology, Enhancement, and Human Nature.Nicole Hassoun - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):289-304.
    Is nanotechnology-based human enhancement morally permissible? One reason to question such enhancement stems from a concern for preserving our species. It is harder than one might think, however, to explain what could be wrong with altering our own species. One possibility is to turn to the environmental ethics literature. Perhaps some of the arguments for preserving other species can be applied against nanotechnology-based human enhancements that alter human nature. This paper critically examines the case for using two of (...)
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  5.  38
    Nanotechnology – Steps Towards Understanding Human Beings as Technology?Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language is adopted. The (...)
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  6.  53
    Nanotechnology Bound: Evaluating the Case for More Regulation. [REVIEW]Patrick Lin - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):105-122.
    In continuing news, there is a growing debate on whether current laws and regulations, both in the US and abroad, need to be strengthened as they relate to nanotechnology. On one side, experts argue that nanomaterials, which are making their way into the marketplace today, are possibly harmful to consumers and the environment, so stronger and new laws are needed to ensure they are safe. On the other side, different experts argue that more regulation will slow down the pace (...)
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  7. Nanotechnology as Ideology: Towards a Critical Theory of ‘Converging Technologies’.Axel Gelfert - 2011 - Science, Technology and Society 17 (1):143-164.
    The present paper contributes to a growing body of philosophical, sociological, and historical analyses of recent nanoscale science and technology. Through a close examination of the origins of contemporary nanotech efforts, their ambitions, and strategic uses, it also aims to provide the basis for a critical theory of emerging technologies more generally, in particular in relation to their alleged convergence in terms of goals and outcomes. The emergence, allure, and implications of nanotechnology, it is argued, can only be fully (...)
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  8.  39
    Nanotechnology, Contingency and Finitude.Christopher Groves - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):1-16.
    It is argued that the social significance of nanotechnologies should be understood in terms of the politics and ethics of uncertainty. This means that the uncertainties surrounding the present and future development of nanotechnologies should not be interpreted, first and foremost, in terms of concepts of risk. It is argued that risk, as a way of managing uncertain futures, has a particular historical genealogy, and as such implies a specific politics and ethics. It is proposed, instead, that the concepts of (...)
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  9.  41
    Can Nanotechnology Be Just? On Nanotechnology and the Emerging Movement for Global Justice.Andrew Jamison - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):129-136.
    Because of the overly market-oriented way in which technological development is carried out, there is a great amount of hubris in regard to how scientific and technological achievements are used in society. There is a tendency to exaggerate the potential commercial benefits and willfully neglect the social, cultural, and environmental consequences of most, if not all innovations, especially in new fields such as nanotechnology. At the same time, there are very few opportunities, or sites, for ensuring that nanotechnology (...)
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  10.  16
    Governing Nanotechnology in a Multi-Stakeholder World.Ineke Malsch - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):161-172.
    This article contributes to the debate on governance of emerging technologies, focusing in particular on the international level and taking into account the fact that these technologies are developed through a common effort of different stakeholders including governments, research communities, industry and civil society actors. These issues are explored from the perspective of communitarian ethical criticism of liberal social contract thinking, in order to enhance visibility of the influence collective non-state actors exercise on the development of these technologies. In particular, (...)
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  11.  68
    Nanotechnology: Considering the Complex Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues with the Parameters of Human Performance. [REVIEW]Linda MacDonald Glenn & Jeanann S. Boyce - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):265-275.
    Nanotechnology: Considering the Complex Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues with the Parameters of Human Performance Content Type Journal Article Pages 265-275 DOI 10.1007/s11569-008-0047-6 Authors Linda MacDonald Glenn, Albany Medical College/Center Alden March Bioethics Institute Albany NY 12208 USA Jeanann S. Boyce, Montgomery College Dept. of Computer Science and Business 7600 Takoma Avenue Takoma Park MD 20912 USA Journal NanoEthics Online ISSN 1871-4765 Print ISSN 1871-4757 Journal Volume Volume 2 Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3.
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  12.  21
    Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW]Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical (...)
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  13.  48
    Nanotechnology: A New Regime for the Public in Science?Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2012 - Scientiae Studia 10 (SPE):85-94.
    "Public engagement in science" is one of the buzzwords that, since 2000, has been used in nanotechnology programs. To what extent does public engagement disrupt the traditional relations between science and the public? This paper briefly contrasts the traditional model of science communication - the diffusionist model - that prevailed in the twentieth century and the new model - the participatory model - that tends to prevail nowadays. Then it will try to disentangle the assumptions underlying the public dialogue (...)
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  14.  5
    Nanotechnology: The Challenge of Regulating Known Unknowns.Robin Fretwell Wilson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):704-713.
    Nanotechnology is a subject about which we know less than we should, but probably more than we think we do at first glance. Like Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's “known unknowns,” we have learned enough to know what we should be concerned with. Glimmers of risk cropped up recently when German authorities recalled a bathroom cleansing product, “MagicNano,” that purported to contain nanosized particles and was on the market for only three days. More than one hundred people suffered severe respiratory (...)
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  15.  75
    Risk Management Principles for Nanotechnology.Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (1):43-60.
    Risk management of nanotechnology is challenged by the enormous uncertainties about the risks, benefits, properties, and future direction of nanotechnology applications. Because of these uncertainties, traditional risk management principles such as acceptable risk, cost–benefit analysis, and feasibility are unworkable, as is the newest risk management principle, the precautionary principle. Yet, simply waiting for these uncertainties to be resolved before undertaking risk management efforts would not be prudent, in part because of the growing public concerns about nanotechnology driven (...)
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  16. Nanotechnology and Nature: On Two Criteria for Understanding Their Relationship.Gregor Schiemann - 2005 - Hyle 11 (1):77 - 96.
    Two criteria are proposed for characterizing the diverse and not yet perspicuous relations between nanotechnology and nature. They assume a concept of nature as that which is not made by human action. One of the criteria endorses a distinction between natural and artificial objects in nanotechnology; the other allows for a discussion of the potential nanotechnological modification of nature. Insofar as current trends may be taken as indicative of future development, nanotechnology might increasingly use the model of (...)
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  17.  57
    Is Nanotechnology Giving Rise to New Ethical Problems?Fabio Bacchini - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):107-119.
    In this paper I focus on the question of whether nanotechnology is giving rise to new ethical problems rather than merely to new instances of old ethical problems. Firstly, I demonstrate how important it is to make a general distinction between new ethical problems and new instances of old problems. Secondly, I propose one possible way of interpreting the distinction and offer a definition of a “new ethical problem”. Thirdly, I examine whether there is good reason to claim that (...)
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  18.  17
    Narrative, Nanotechnology and the Accomplishment of Public Responses: A Response to Thorstensen.Matthew Kearnes, Phil Macnaghten & Sarah R. Davies - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):241-250.
    In this paper, we respond to a critique by Erik Thorstensen of the ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ project concerning its ‘realist’ treatment of narrative, its restricted analytical framework and resources, its apparent confusion in focus and its unjustified contextualisation and overextension of its findings. We show that these criticisms are based on fairly serious misunderstandings of the DEEPEN project, its interdisciplinary approachand its conceptual context. Having responded to Thorstensen’s criticisms, we take the opportunity to clarify and (...)
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  19.  11
    Nanotechnology Policy and Education.Regan Stinnett - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):551-552.
    Nanotechnology has been a focal area of United States (US) Science and Technology policy since President Clinton's administration. The Unites States is investing more funds in nanotechnology research and development than any other nation. The US National Laboratory community and Sandia National Laboratories in particular is responding to their country's interest by generating exceptional Nano-based science and technology and focusing these efforts on national security and safety concerns. The United States and others are finding that the technological, safety, (...)
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  20.  5
    Nanotechnology: The Challenge of Regulating Known Unknowns.Robin Fretwell Wilson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):704-713.
    Media reports of the health hazards posed by nano-sized particles have turned a white hot spotlight on the risks of nanotechnology. Worried about the risks posed to workers producing nano-materials, the Washington Post has labeled nanotechnology a “seat-of-the-pants occupational health experiment.” This article examines our emerging knowledge base about the hazards of two types of exposure: inhalation of NSPs and topical application of products containing NSPs. It argues that a clear-eyed evaluation of the benefits and risks of (...) is made extremely difficult by the marriage of a complex science with a venture capitalist-like hype. It then suggests that, absent additional statutory authority, governmental regulators cannot readily address the risks posed by these products. This regulatory inaction leaves a significant role for the private insurance market, a role that regulators should support in tangible ways outlined in the article. (shrink)
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  21.  64
    Ethical Responsibilities of Nanotechnology Researchers: A Short Guide. [REVIEW]Robert McGinn - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (1):1-12.
    Little if any of the scholarly literature on nanotechnology (NT) and ethics is directed at NT researchers. Many of these practitioners believe that having clear ethical guidelines for the conduct of NT research is necessary. This work attempts to provide such guidelines. While no qualitatively new ethical issues unique to NT have yet been identified, the ethical responsibilities identified below merit serious attention by NT researchers. Thirteen specific ethical responsibilities arising at three levels are identified. They are derived by (...)
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  22.  24
    Nanotechnology & Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - 2008 - Springer.
    The essays tackle such contentious issues as environmental impact, health dangers, medical benefits, intellectual property, professional code of ethics, privacy ...
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  23.  23
    Introduction: Nanotechnology, Society, and Ethics.Patrick Lin & Fritz Allhoff - 2008 - In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Nanotechnology & Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues. Dordrecht: Springer.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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  24.  19
    Nanotechnology in Global Medicine and Human Biosecurity: Private Interests, Policy Dilemmas, and the Calibration of Public Health Law.Thomas A. Faunce - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):629-642.
    This article explores a unique opportunity for shaping public health law and policy to reflect a greater balance between public and private goods in two areas of primary concern to human well-being: medicine and human biosecurity. This opportunity is presented both by the rapid changes likely to occur in these areas as a result of nanotechnology and the fact that multinational corporate actors have not yet had the opportunity to use their well-honed techniques of governance influence to modify public (...)
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  25.  21
    What is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter: From Science to Ethics.Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Daniel Moore - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Ongoing research in nanotechnology promises both innovations and risks, potentially and profoundly changing the world. This book helps to promote a balanced understanding of this important emerging technology, offering an informed and impartial look at the technology, its science, and its social impact and ethics. Nanotechnology is crucial for the next generation of industries, financial markets, research labs, and our everyday lives; this book provides an informed and balanced look at nanotechnology and its social impact Offers a (...)
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  26.  18
    Nanotechnology in Global Medicine and Human Biosecurity: Private Interests, Policy Dilemmas, and the Calibration of Public Health Law.Thomas A. Faunce - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):629-642.
    This paper considers how best to approach dilemmas posed to global health and biosecurity policy by increasing advances in practical applications of nanotechnology. The type of nano-technology policy dilemmas discussed include: expenditure of public funds, public-funded research priorities, public confidence in government and science and, finally, public safety. The article examines the value in this context of a legal obligation that the development of relevant public health law be calibrated against less corporate-infuenced norms issuing from bioethics and international human (...)
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  27.  1
    Advertising Nanotechnology: Imagining the Invisible.Padraig Murphy, Cormac Deane & Norah Campbell - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (6):965-997.
    Advertisements for high-technology products and services visualize processes and phenomena which are unvisualizable, such as globalization, networks, and information. We turn our attention specifically to the case of nanotechnology advertisements, using an approach that combines visual and sonic culture. Just as phenomena such as complexity and networks have become established in everyday discourse, nanotechnology seizes the social imaginary by establishing its own aesthetic conventions. Elaborating Raymond Williams’ concept of structures of feeling, we show that in visualizing nanotechnology, (...)
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  28.  76
    Ethics and Nanotechnology: Views of Nanotechnology Researchers. [REVIEW]Robert McGinn - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (2):101-131.
    A study was conducted of nanotechnology (NT) researchers’ views about ethics in relation to their work. By means of a purpose-built questionnaire, made available on the Internet, the study probed NT researchers’ general attitudes toward and beliefs about ethics in relation to NT, as well as their views about specific NT-related ethical issues. The questionnaire attracted 1,037 respondents from 13 U.S. university-based NT research facilities. Responses to key questionnaire items are summarized and noteworthy findings presented. For most respondents, the (...)
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  29.  25
    Nanotechnology and Privacy.Jeroen van den Hoven - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):215-228.
    The development of ever smaller integrated circuits at the sub-micron and nanoscale—in accordance with Moore’s Law—drives the production of very small tags, smart cards, smart labels and sensors. Nanoelectronics and submicron technology supports surveillance technology which is practically invisible. I argue that one of the most urgent and immediate concerns associated with nanotechnology is privacy. Computing in the twenty-first century will not only be pervasive and ubiquitous, but also inconspicuous. If these features are not counteracted in design, they will (...)
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  30.  27
    Ethics in Nanotechnology: What’s Being Done? What’s Missing? [REVIEW]Louis Y. Y. Lu, Bruce J. Y. Lin, John S. Liu & Chang-Yung Yu - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):583-598.
    Nanotechnology shows great promise in a variety of applications with attractive economic and societal benefits. However, societal issues associated with nanotechnology are still a concern to the general public. While numerous technological advancements in nanotechnology have been achieved over the past decade, research into the broader societal issues of nanotechnology is still in its early phases. Based on the data from the Web of Science database, we applied the main path analysis, cluster analysis and text mining (...)
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  31.  11
    Nanotechnology and the Negotiation of Novelty.Arne Hessenbruch - 2004 - In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 135--44.
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  32.  13
    Nanotechnology and Privacy.Jeroen van den Hoven - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):215-228.
    The development of ever smaller integrated circuits at the sub-micron and nanoscale—in accordance with Moore’s Law—drives the production of very small tags, smart cards, smart labels and sensors. Nanoelectronics and submicron technology supports surveillance technology which is practically invisible. I argue that one of the most urgent and immediate concerns associated with nanotechnology is privacy. Computing in the twenty-first century will not only be pervasive and ubiquitous, but also inconspicuous. If these features are not counteracted in design, they will (...)
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  33.  30
    Nanotechnology: Societal Implications—Individual Perspectives.William Sims Bainbridge - unknown
    Managing the Nanotechnology Revolution: Consider the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Criteria.................................................................................. 24..
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  34.  25
    Defining Nano, Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine: Why Should It Matter?Priya Satalkar, Bernice Simone Elger & David M. Shaw - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1255-1276.
    Nanotechnology, which involves manipulation of matter on a ‘nano’ scale, is considered to be a key enabling technology. Medical applications of nanotechnology are expected to significantly improve disease diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and subsequently reduce health care costs. However, there is no consensus on the definition of nanotechnology or nanomedicine, and this stems from the underlying debate on defining ‘nano’. This paper aims to present the diversity in the definition of nanomedicine and its impact on the translation (...)
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  35.  24
    Southern Roles in Global Nanotechnology Innovation: Perspectives From Thailand and Australia. [REVIEW]Donald C. Maclurcan - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):137-156.
    The term ‘nano-divide’ has become a catch-phrase for describing various kinds of global nanotechnology inequities. However, there has been little in-depth exploration as to what the global nano-divide really means, and limited commentary on its early nature. Furthermore, the literature often presents countries from the Global South as ‘passive’ agents in global nanotechnology innovation—without the ability to develop endogenous nanotechnology capabilities. Yet others point to nanotechnology providing opportunities for the South to play new roles in the (...)
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  36.  19
    Socio-Ethical Education in Nanotechnology Engineering Programmes: A Case Study in Malaysia. [REVIEW]Balamuralithara Balakrishnan, Pek Hoon Er & Punita Visvanathan - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1341-1355.
    The unique properties of nanotechnology have made nanotechnology education and its related subjects increasingly important not only for students but for mankind at large. This particular technology brings educators to work together to prepare and produce competent engineers and scientists for this field. One of the key challenges in nanotechnology engineering is to produce graduate students who are not only competent in technical knowledge but possess the necessary attitude and awareness toward the social and ethical issues related (...)
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  37.  49
    Cultural Diversity in Nanotechnology Ethics.Joachim Schummer - unknown
    Along with the rapid worldwide advance of nanotechnology, debates on associated ethical issues have spread from local to international levels. However, unlike science and engineer- ing issues, international perceptions of ethical issues are very diverse. This paper provides an analysis of how sociocultural factors such as language, cultural heritage, economics and politics can affect how people perceive ethical issues of nanotechnology. By attempting to clarify the significance of sociocultural issues in ethical considerations my aim is to support the (...)
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  38.  44
    Representations of Nanotechnology in Norwegian Newspapers — Implications for Public Participation.Kamilla Lein Kjølberg - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):61-72.
    Public participation is a prominent issue in the nanoethics literature. This paper analyses the emerging awareness of nanoscience and nanotechnology (nano S&T) in the Norwegian public sphere, as evidenced by newspaper coverage. In particular, attention is on representations of nano S&T and their relation to public participation. Three dominant representations are found; nano S&T as positive, nano S&T as important for the future and nano S&T as under control. It is argued that the prominence of these representations is unfortunate (...)
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  39.  31
    Patentable Novelty in Nanotechnology Inventions: A Legal Study in Iraq and Malaysia. [REVIEW]Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi & Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):121-133.
    Nanotechnology has been facing multiple obstacles related to the applicability of patentability criteria. In this article, the authors addressed the novelty requirement in nanotechnology inventions in Iraqi and Malaysian patent acts. First, novelty was discussed to determine its applicability in the field of nanotechnology. Then, problems on nanotechnology patent application were presented along with some suggested solutions. The problems encountered in the patentability of nanotechnology inventions were summarized in two categories. First, the multidisciplinary nature of (...)
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  40.  85
    The Social Impacts of Nanotechnology: An Ethical and Political Analysis. [REVIEW]Robert Sparrow - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):13-23.
    This paper attempts some predictions about the social consequences of nanotechnology and the ethical issues they raise. I set out four features of nanotechnology that are likely to be important in determining its impact and argue that nanotechnology will have significant social impacts in—at least—the areas of health and medicine, the balance of power between citizens and governments, and the balance of power between citizens and corporations. More importantly, responding to the challenge of nanotechnology will require (...)
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  41.  11
    Chaos and Control: Nanotechnology and the Politics of Emergence.Matthew Kearnes - 2006 - Paragraph 29 (2):57-80.
    This article looks at the strong links between Deleuze's molecular ontology and the fields of complexity and emergence, and argues that Deleuze's work implies a ‘philosophy of technology’ that is both open and dynamic. Following Simondon and von Uexküll, Deleuze suggests that technical objects are ontologically unstable, and are produced by processes of individuation and self-organization in complex relations with their environment. For Deleuze design is not imposed from without, but emerges from within matter. The fundamental departure for Deleuze, on (...)
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  42.  51
    The Precautionary Principle in Nanotechnology.James Moor - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):191-204.
    The precautionary principle (PP) is thought by many to be a useful strategy for action and by many others useless at best and dangerous at worst. We argue that it is a coherent and useful principle. We first clarify the principle and then defend it against a number of common criticisms. Three examples from nanotechnology are used; nanoparticles and possible health and environmental problems, grey goo and the potential for catastrophe, and privacy risks generated by nanoelectronics.
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  43. Evaluating Future Nanotechnology: The Net Societal Impacts of Atomically Precise Manufacturing.Steven Umbrello & Seth D. Baum - 2018 - Futures 100:63-73.
    Atomically precise manufacturing (APM) is the assembly of materials with atomic precision. APM does not currently exist, and may not be feasible, but if it is feasible, then the societal impacts could be dramatic. This paper assesses the net societal impacts of APM across the full range of important APM sectors: general material wealth, environmental issues, military affairs, surveillance, artificial intelligence, and space travel. Positive effects were found for material wealth, the environment, military affairs (specifically nuclear disarmament), and space travel. (...)
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  44.  15
    Nanotechnology Will Change More Than Just One Thing.Tihamer Toth-Fejel - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):12-13.
  45.  33
    Laboratory Safety and Nanotechnology Workers: An Analysis of Current Guidelines in the USA.Jeong Joo Ahn, Youngjae Kim, Elizabeth A. Corley & Dietram A. Scheufele - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (1):5-23.
    Although some regulatory frameworks for the occupational health and safety of nanotechnology workers have been developed, worker safety and health issues in these laboratory environments have received less attention than many other areas of nanotechnology regulation. In addition, workers in nanotechnology labs are likely to face unknown risks and hazards because few of the guidelines and rules for worker safety are mandatory. In this article, we provide an overview of the current health and safety guidelines for (...) laboratory workers by exploring guidelines from different organizations, including the Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Texas A&M University, and University of Massachusetts-Lowell. After discussing these current guidelines, we apply an ethical framework to each set of guidelines to explore any gaps that might exist in them. By conducting this gap analysis, we are able to highlight some of the weaknesses that might be important for future policy development in this area. We conclude by outlining how future guidelines might address some of these gaps, specifically the issue of workers’ participation in the process of establishing safety measures and the development and enforcement of more unified guidelines. (shrink)
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  46.  7
    Nanotechnology and the Military.Daniel Moore - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Dimension of Nanotechnology.
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  47.  30
    What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos.Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.) - 2008 - Elsevier/Academic Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes kapitelvis.
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  48.  15
    Framing the Discussion: Nanotechnology and the Social Construction of Technology--What STS Scholars Are Saying.Stephen H. Cutcliffe, Christine M. Pense & Michael Zvalaren - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (2):81-99.
    The emergence of nanotechnology, with all its promises of economic, social, and medical benefits, along with dire predictions of environmental, health, and safety threats, has occasioned an active debate in the Science and Technology Studies field, in which we have seen five distinct conversations that frame the discussion. The topical threads include ethics, regulation, opportunities and threats including utopian/dystopian visions of the future, public perception, public participation. These conversational distinctions are not absolutes with firm borders as they clearly overlap (...)
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  49.  53
    Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks.Heidrun Åm - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):115-128.
    This paper reflects on the change of relations among participants in nanotechnology governance through their participation in governance processes such as stakeholder dialogues. I show that policymaking in practice—that is, the practice of coming and working together in such stakeholder dialogues—has the potential for two-fold performative effects: it can contribute to the development of trust and mutual responsibility on the part of the involved actors, and it may bring about effects on the formation of boundaries of what is sayable (...)
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  50. Self-Assembly, Self-Organization: Nanotechnology and Vitalism. [REVIEW]Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):31-42.
    Over the past decades, self-assembly has attracted a lot of research attention and transformed the relations between chemistry, materials science and biology. The paper explores the impact of the current interest in self-assembly techniques on the traditional debate over the nature of life. The first section describes three different research programs of self-assembly in nanotechnology in order to characterize their metaphysical implications: (1) Hybridization (using the building blocks of living systems for making devices and machines) ; (2) Biomimetics (making (...)
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