Order:
  1.  20
    Possession and Dispossession: Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Gregory of Nyssa on Life Amidst Skepticism.Natalie Carnes - 2013 - Modern Theology 29 (1):104-123.
    This article follows Ludwig Wittgenstein, Stanley Cavell, and Gregory of Nyssa in a journey of epistemic dispossession. It begins by tracing two ways of wandering off this trail, two epistemological sirens that tempt wayfarers from a path of epistemic dispossession. These are skepticism and anti‐skepticism, elaborated by Wittgenstein and Cavell as joined in their enthronement of epistemically‐anchored certainty. Following Wittgenstein and Cavell into an exploration of the forms of life and death that sustain and are sustained by grasping at such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. A Reconsideration of Religious Authority in Christian Theology.Natalie Carnes - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (3):467-480.
    As Stanley Cavell has critiqued Christianity for displacing authority from the individual to somewhere beyond critical assessment, so several Christian theologians have also turned to Wittgenstein to justify just such displacement. This article suggests that both offer theologically impoverished and historically inattentive accounts of authority. It aims instead to sketch five moments in the Christian tradition to suggest five ways of naming the intimacy of religious authority with individual critical assessment. Such intimacy is then theologically described through the doctrinal loci (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  29
    The Mysteries of Our Existence: Estrangement and Theatricality.Natalie Carnes - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (3):402-422.
    “Theater” has become a fashionable metaphor that theologians and ethicists deploy to correct what they see as a Gnostic or antinomian impulse to prioritize “inner state” over “outer action.” But their turn to theater as an easy way to valorize “outer action” conflates person and role, generating a confused anthropology that 1) obscures what theater could make obvious about occupational roles; 2) misses the distinctively non‐theatrical character of performing Christ and church; and 3) renders actions more easily legible than they (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark