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Natasha McKeever [18]Natasha Chloe McKeever [1]
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Natasha McKeever
University of Leeds
  1. Asexuality.Luke Brunning & Natasha McKeever - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):497-517.
  2. Is the Requirement of Sexual Exclusivity Consistent with Romantic Love?Natasha McKeever - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):353-369.
    In some cultures, people tend to believe that it is very important to be sexually exclusive in romantic relationships and idealise monogamous romantic relationships; but there is a tension in this ideal. Sex is generally considered to have value, and usually when we love someone we want to increase the amount of value in their lives, not restrict it without good reason. There is thus a call, not yet adequately responded to by philosophers, for greater clarity in the reasons §why (...)
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  3. Why, and to what extent, is sexual infidelity wrong?Natasha McKeever - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):515-537.
    Sexual infidelity is widespread, but it is also widely condemned, yet relatively little philosophical work has been done on what makes it wrong and how wrong it is. In this paper, I argue that sexual infidelity is wrong if it involves breaking a commitment to be sexually exclusive, which has special significance in the relationship. However, it is not necessarily worse than other kinds of infidelity, and the context in which it takes place ought to be considered. I finish the (...)
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  4. Critiquing Consensual Adult Incest.Natasha McKeever - forthcoming - In Brian D. Earp, Clare Chambers & Lori Watson (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Sex and Sexuality.
    In this chapter, I argue that we can make sense of moral norms against consensual, adult incest by appealing to the value of familial relationships and the potential for sex to damage them. Viewing sex as unconscionable between family members helps to enable the loving intimacy normally associated with family relationships. Therefore, there is good reason for incest, even when consensual and between adults, to remain taboo. That being said, I argue that there is insufficient legal justification for all consensual, (...)
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  5.  95
    What can we learn about romantic love from Harry Frankfurt’s account of love?Natasha Chloe McKeever - 2019 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 14 (3).
    Harry Frankfurt has a comprehensive and, at times, compelling, account of love, which are outlined in several of his works. However, he does not think that romantic love fits the ideal of love as it ‘includes a number of vividly distracting elements, which do not belong to the essential nature of love as a mode of disinterested concern’. In this paper, I argue that we can, nonetheless, learn some important things about romantic love from his account. Furthermore, I will suggest, (...)
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  6.  48
    Friends with Benefits: Is Sex Compatible with Friendship?Natasha McKeever - forthcoming - In Diane Jeske (ed.), The Routledge Handbook for the Philosophy of Friendship. New York, NY, USA: pp. 347-358.
    Natasha McKeever argues that prima facie, a friends-with-benefits relationship can be, at the same time, a good friendship. This is because sex is compatible with friendship in that it can complement and potentially even strengthen the three core characteristics of friendship: mutual liking, mutual caring, and mutual sharing. She acknowledges that, by generating uncertainty and having the potential to generate feelings of romantic love, sex does pose risks to friendship. However, she argues that while these risks are significant considerations, they (...)
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  7.  91
    Sexual Jealousy and Sexual Infidelity.Natasha McKeever & Luke Brunning - 2022 - In David Boonin (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Sexual Ethics. pp. 93-110.
    In this chapter, Natasha McKeever and Luke Brunning consider (sexual) jealousy in romantic life. They argue that jealousy is best understood as an emotional response to the threatened loss of love or attention, to which one feels deserving, because of a rival. Furthermore, the general value of jealousy can be questioned, and jealousy’s instrumental value needs to be balanced against a range of potential harms. They assess two potential ways of managing jealousy (which are not mutually exclusive)—firstly by adopting a (...)
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  8. Love: what's sex got to do with it?Natasha McKeever - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):201-218.
    It is usually taken for granted that romantic relationships will be sexual, but it seems that there is no necessary reason for this, as it is possible for romantic relationships to not include sex. Indeed, sometimes sex is a part of a romantic relationship for only a relatively short period of it. Furthermore, scientific explanations of the link between sex and love don’t seem fully satisfying because they tell us only about the mechanics of sex, rather than its meaning or (...)
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  9.  12
    Irrational Love: Taking Romeo and Juliet Seriously.Natasha McKeever & Joe Saunders - 2022 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 30 (3):254-275.
    This paper argues that there are important irrational elements to love. In the philosophical literature, we typically find that love is either thought of as rational or arational and that any irrational elements are thought to be defective, or extraneous to love itself. We argue, on the contrary, that irrationality is in part connected to what we find valuable about love. -/- We focus on 3 basic elements of love: -/- 1) Whom you love 2) How much you love them (...)
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  10.  52
    Prostitution and the Good of Sex: A Reply to Settegast.Natasha McKeever - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (4):765-784.
    In Sascha Settegast’s recently published article, “Prostitution and the Good of Sex” in Social Theory and Practice, he argues that prostitution is intrinsically harmful. In this article, I object to his argument, making the following three responses to his account: 1) bad sex is not “detrimental to the good life”; 2) bad sex is not necessarily unvirtuous; 3) sex work is work as well as sex, and so must be evaluated as work in addition to as sex.
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  11.  89
    Can a Woman Rape a Man and Why Does It Matter?Natasha McKeever - 2019 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 13 (4):599-619.
    Under current UK legislation, only a man can commit rape. This paper argues that this is an unjustified double standard that reinforces problematic gendered stereotypes about male and female sexuality. I first reject three potential justifications for making penile penetration a condition of rape: it is physically impossible for a woman to rape a man; it is a more serious offence to forcibly penetrate someone than to force them to penetrate you; rape is a gendered crime. I argue that, as (...)
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  12.  41
    Love's Vision – By Troy Jollimore. [REVIEW]Natasha Mckeever - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):88-90.
  13.  27
    Philosophy of Love in the Past, Present, and Future.André Grahle, Natasha McKeever & Joe Saunders - 2022 - Routledge.
    This volume features original essays on the philosophy of love. The essays are organized thematically around the past, present, and future of philosophical thinking about love. In section I, the contributors explore what we can learn from the history of philosophical thinking about love. The chapters cover Ancient Greek thinkers, namely Plato and Aristotle, as well as Kierkegaard's critique of preferential love and Erich Fromm's mystic interpretation of sexual relations. Section II covers current conceptions and practices of love. These chapters (...)
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  14. The Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings, 8th edition.Raja Halwani, Jacob M. Held, Natasha McKeever & Alan G. Soble (eds.) - 2022 - Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This is the 8th edition of the book, with eight new essays to the volume. Table of contents: Are We Having Sex Now or What? (Greta Christina); Sexual Perversion (Thomas Nagel); Plain Sex (Alan Goldman); Sex and Sexual Perversion (Robert Gray); Masturbation and the Continuum of Sexual Activities (Alan Soble); Love: What’s Sex Got to Do with It? (Natasha McKeever); Is “Loving More” Better? The Values of Polyamory (Elizabeth Brake); What Is Sexual Orientation? (Robin Dembroff); Sexual Orientation: What Is It? (...)
     
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  15.  3
    The philosophy of sex: contemporary readings.Raja Halwani, Jacob M. Held & Natasha McKeever (eds.) - 2022 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.
    With twenty-five essays, eight of which are new to this edition, this best-selling volume examines the nature, morality, and social meanings of contemporary sexual phenomena.
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  16.  31
    Elizabeth Brake: Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality and the Law: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2012, x + 240 pp. [REVIEW]Natasha McKeever - 2013 - Res Publica 19 (3):285-289.
  17. Asexuality (reprint).Natasha McKeever & Luke Bunning - 2022 - In Raja Halwani, Jacob Held, Natasha McKeever & Alan Soble (eds.), The Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings 8th Edition. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 185-215.
    Asexuality is overlooked in the philosophical literature and in wider society. Such neglect produces incomplete or inaccurate accounts of romantic life and harms asexual people. We develop an account of asexuality to redress this neglect and enrich discussion of romantic life. Asexual experiences are diverse. Some asexual people have sex; some have romantic relationships in the absence of sex. We accept the common definition of asexuality as the absence of sexual attraction and explain how sexual attraction and sexual desire differ (...)
     
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  18. Love: what's sex got to do with it? (reprint).Natasha McKeever - 2022 - In Raja Halwani, Jacob Held, Natasha McKeever & Alan Soble (eds.), The Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings, 8th edition. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 97-121.
    In this paper I will consider whether there is something intelligible in finding value in having or aspiring to a certain kind of relationship which includes sex as a central feature. I argue that a scientific explanation can tell us only about the mechanics of sex, not what it feels like or means to us. Thus, we need to consider the meaning and significance of sex in relation to what we typically value about romantic love. I argue that sex is (...)
     
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  19. Sad Love: Romance and the Search for Meaning.Natasha McKeever - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    In Sad Love: Romance and the Search for Meaning, Carrie Jenkins invites the reader to reconceptualize romantic love. In particular, she takes issue with the ideology that romantic love should be about being ‘happy ever after’, as fairy tales would have us believe. In a similar way to how we expect parental love to involve struggle, and a range of emotions besides happiness, Jenkins argues that we should expect romantic love to involve the whole spectrum of emotions. Thus, being sad (...)
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