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  1.  21
    Medical Acts and Conscientious Objection: What Can a Physician Be Compelled to Do.Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):262-282.
    A key question has been underexplored in the literature on conscientious objection: if a physician is required to perform ‘medical activities,’ what is a medical activity? This paper explores the question by employing a teleological evaluation of medicine and examining the analogy of military conscripts, commonly cited in the conscientious objection debate. It argues that physicians (and other healthcare professionals) can only be expected to perform and support medical acts – acts directed towards their patients’ health. That is, physicians cannot (...)
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  2.  7
    To Die, to Sleep, Perchance to Dream? A Response to DeMichelis, Shaul and Rapoport.Joel L. Gamble, Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):832-834.
    In developing their policy on paediatric medical assistance in dying, DeMichelis, Shaul and Rapoport decide to treat euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide as ethically and practically equivalent to other end-of-life interventions, particularly palliative sedation and withdrawal of care. We highlight several flaws in the authors’ reasoning. Their argument depends on too cursory a dismissal of intention, which remains fundamental to medical ethics and law. Furthermore, they have not fairly presented the ethical analyses justifying other end-of-life decisions, analyses and decisions that were (...)
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  3.  25
    Teleology and Defining Sex.Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):176-189.
    Disorders of sexual differentiation lead to what is often referred to as an intersex state. This state has medical, as well as some legal, recognition. Nevertheless, the question remains whether intersex persons occupy a state in between maleness and femaleness or whether they are truly men or women. To answer this question, another important conundrum needs to be first solved: what defines sex? The answer seems rather simple to most people, yet when morphology does not coincide with haplotypes, and genetics (...)
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  4.  6
    Should Parents Be Asked to Consent for Life-Saving Paediatric Interventions?Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - forthcoming - Journal of the Intensive Care Society.
    Informed consent, when given by proxy, has limitations: chiefly, it must be made in the interest of the patient. Here we critique the standard approach to parental consent, as present in Canada and the UK. Parents are often asked for consent, but are not given the authority to refuse medically beneficial treatment in many situations. This prompts the question of whether it is possible for someone to consent if they cannot refuse. We present two alternative and philosophically more consistent frameworks (...)
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  5.  5
    The Rule of Right Vs Might: A Reply to Wischik's ‘Nazis, Teleology, and the Freedom of Conscience'.Nathan K. Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2021 - The New Bioethics 27 (1):81-95.
    Wischik presents an extensive reply to our paper on conscientious objection, which explores the implications of distinguishing ‘medical acts’ from ‘socioclinical acts’. He provides an extensive leg...
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  6.  4
    Reasonable Parental and Medical Obligations in Pediatric Extraordinary Therapy.Michal Pruski & Nathan K. Gamble - 2019 - The Linacre Quarterly 86 (2-3):198-206.
    The English cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans involved a conflict between the desires of their parents to preserve their children’s lives and judgments of their medical teams in pursuit of clinically appropriate therapy. The treatment the children required was clearly extraordinary, including a wide array of advanced life-sustaining technological support. The cases exemplify a clash of worldviews rooted in different philosophies of life and medical care. The article highlights the differing perspectives on parental authority in medical care in (...)
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