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  1. Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky & Nathan Rosen - 1935 - Physical Review (47):777-780.
  2.  95
    A Weyl-Dirac Geometric Particle.Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1996 - Foundations of Physics 26 (5):585-594.
    A spherically symmetric entity with the Weyl-Dirac geometry holding in its interior is investigated. The structure is determined by the presence of the Dirac gauge function, which creates a mass density. Two models are obtained, one that can describe a cosmic body, the other an elementary particle.
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  3.  81
    A Semiclassical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics.Nathan Rosen - 1984 - Foundations of Physics 14 (7):579-605.
    The single-particle wave function ψ=ReiS/h has been interpreted classically: At a given point the particle momentum is ▽S, and the relative particle density in an ensemble is R 2 . It is first proposed to modify this interpretation by assuming that physical variables undergo rapid fluctuations, so that ▽S is the average of the momentum over a short time interval. However, it appears that this is not enough. It seems necessary to assume that the density also fluctuates. The fluctuations are (...)
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  4.  74
    Quantum Particles and Classical Particles.Nathan Rosen - 1986 - Foundations of Physics 16 (8):687-700.
    The relation between wave mechanics and classical mechanics is reviewed, and it is stressed that the latter cannot be regarded as the limit of the former as ℏ →0. The motion of a classical particle (or ensemble of particles) is described by means of a Schrödinger-like equation that was found previously. A system of a quantum particle and a classical particle is investigated (1) for an interaction that leads to stationary states with discrete energies and (2) for an interaction that (...)
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  5.  60
    Cosmic Dark Matter and Dirac Gauge Function.Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1995 - Foundations of Physics 25 (5):763-777.
    It is suggested that the dark matter of the universe is due to the presence of a scalar field described by the gauge function introduced by Dirac in his modification of the Weyl geometry. The behavior of such dark matter is investigated.
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  6.  40
    A Classical Klein—Gordon Particle.Nathan Rosen - 1994 - Foundations of Physics 24 (11):1563-1569.
    An elementary particle is described as a spherically symmetric solution of the Klein-Gordon equation and the Einstein equations of general relativity. It is found that it has a mass of the order of the Planck mass. If one assumes that the motion of its center of mass is determined by the Dirac equations, then it has a spin of 1/2.
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  7.  34
    Some Schwarzschild Solutions and Their Singularities.Nathan Rosen - 1985 - Foundations of Physics 15 (4):517-529.
    A number of different forms of the Schwarzschild solution are considered. The static forms all have a singularity at the Schwarzschild radius. This Schwarzschild singularity can be eliminated if one goes over to a stationary or time-dependent form of solution. However, the coordinate transformations needed for this have singularities. It is stressed that coordinate systems connected by singular transformations are not equivalent and the corresponding metrics may describe different physical situations.
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  8.  27
    Weyl's Geometry and Physics.Nathan Rosen - 1982 - Foundations of Physics 12 (3):213-248.
    It is proposed to remove the difficulty of nonitegrability of length in the Weyl geometry by modifying the law of parallel displacement and using “standard” vectors. The field equations are derived from a variational principle slightly different from that of Dirac and involving a parameter σ. For σ=0 one has the electromagnetic field. For σ<0 there is a vector meson field. This could be the electromagnetic field with finite-mass photons, or it could be a meson field providing the “missing mass” (...)
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  9.  21
    A Geometric Foundation for a Unified Field Theory.Nathan Rosen & Gerald E. Tauber - 1984 - Foundations of Physics 14 (2):171-186.
    Generalizing the work of Einstein and Mayer, it is assumed that at each point of space-time there exists an N-dimensional linear vector space with N≥5. This space is decomposed into a four-dimensional tangent space and an (N - 4)-dimensional internal space. On the basis of geometric considerations, one arrives at a number of fields, the field equations being derived from a variational principle. Among the fields obtained there are the electromagnetic field, Yang-Mills gauge fields, and fields that can be interpreted (...)
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  10.  21
    The Bimetric Weyl-Dirac Theory and the Gravitational Constant.Nathan Rosen - 1983 - Foundations of Physics 13 (3):363-372.
    The Weyl-Dirac theory of gravitation and electromagnetism is modified by the introduction of a background metric characterized by a scale constant related to the size of the universe. One is led to a natural gauge giving ${{\dot G} \mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {{\dot G} G}} \right. \kern-0em} G} = - 5.5 \times 10^{ - 12} y^{ - 1} $ . This is smaller by about a factor of ten than the value obtained on the basis of Dirac's large number hypothesis.
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  11.  20
    Einstein: Distant Parallelism and Electromagnetism. [REVIEW]Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1985 - Foundations of Physics 15 (3):365-377.
    Einstein's approach to unified field theories based on the geometry of distant parallelism is discussed. The simplest theory of this type, describing gravitation and electromagnetism, is investigated. It is found that there is a charge-current density vector associated with the geometry. However, in the static spherically symmetric case no singularity-free solutions for this vector exist.
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  12.  16
    Vector-Spinor Space and Field Equations.Nathan Rosen & Gerald E. Tauber - 1987 - Foundations of Physics 17 (1):63-99.
    Generalizing the work of Einstein and Mayer, it is assumed that at each point of space-time there exists a vector-spinor space with Nv vector dimensions and Ns spinor dimensions, where Nv=2k and Ns=2 k, k⩾3. This space is decomposed into a tangent space with4 vector and4 spinor dimensions and an internal space with Nv−4 vector and Ns−4 spinor dimension. A variational principle leads to field equations for geometric quantities which can be identified with physical fields such as the electromagnetic field, (...)
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  13.  3
    General Relativity with a Background Metric.Nathan Rosen - 1980 - Foundations of Physics 10 (9-10):673-704.
    An attempt is made to remove singularities arising in general relativity by modifying it so as to take into account the existence of a fundamental rest frame in the universe. This is done by introducing a background metric γμν (in addition to gμν) describing a spacetime of constant curvature with positive spatial curvature. The additional terms in the field equations are negligible for the solar system but important for intense fields. Cosmological models are obtained without singular states but simulating the (...)
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  14.  9
    Localization of Gravitational Energy.Nathan Rosen - 1985 - Foundations of Physics 15 (10):997-1008.
    In the general relativity theory gravitational energy-momentum density is usually described by a pseudo-tensor with strange transformation properties so that one does not have localization of gravitational energy. It is proposed to set up a gravitational energy-momentum density tensor having a unique form in a given coordinate system by making use of a bimetric formalism. Two versions are considered: (1) a bimetric theory with a flat-space background metric which retains the physics of the general relativity theory and (2) one with (...)
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  15.  9
    Classical Elementary Particles in General Relativity.Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (10):1237-1247.
    Elementary particles, regarded as the constituents of quarks and leptons, are described classically in the framework of the general relativity theory. There are neutral particles and particles having charges±1/3e. They are taken to be spherically symmetric and to have mass density, pressure, and (if charged) charge density. They are characterized by an equation of state P=−ρ suggested by earlier work on cosmology. The neutral particle has a very simple structure. In the case of the charged particle there is one outstanding (...)
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  16.  8
    Elementary Particles in Bimetric General Relativity.Nathan Rosen - 1989 - Foundations of Physics 19 (3):339-348.
    A classical model of an elementary particle is considered in the framework of the bimetric general relativity theory. The particle is regarded as a spherically symmetric object filling its Schwarzschild sphere and made of matter having mass density, pressure, and charge density. The mass is taken to be the Planck mass, and possible values of the charge are taken as zero, ±1/3e, ±2/3e, and ±e, with e the electron charge.
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  17.  7
    The Static Character of Prematter Particles.Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1992 - Foundations of Physics 22 (4):549-554.
    It is shown that all spherically symmetric distributions of prematter in the framework of general relativity are static. These results provide a justification for the models of elementary particles proposed previously.
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  18.  7
    Can One Have a Universal Time in General Relativity?Nathan Rosen - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (4):459-472.
    The rest-frame of the universe determines a universal, or absolute time, that given by a clock at rest in it. The question is raised whether one can have a satisfactory universal time in general relativity if a gravitational field is present, i.e., whether there are coordinates such that the coordinate time is the time given everywhere by a clock at rest and they provide the correct description of our everyday experience. Several attempts are made to find such coordinates, but the (...)
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  19.  6
    A Gauge-Covariant Bimetric Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism.Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen - 1983 - Foundations of Physics 13 (10):1023-1045.
    The Weyl theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, as modified by Dirac, contains a gauge-covariant scalar β which has no geometric significance. This is a flaw if one is looking for a geometric description of gravitation and electromagnetism. A bimetric formalism is therefore introduced which enables one to replace β by a geometric quantity. The formalism can be simplified by the use of a gauge-invariant physical metric. The resulting theory agrees with the general relativity for phenomena in the solar system.
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  20. Elementary Particles in Bimetric General Relativity. II.Nathan Rosen - 1989 - Foundations of Physics 19 (11):1337-1344.