Results for 'Navigation'

259 found
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  1.  81
    Communication as Navigation: A New Role for Consciousness in Language.Erica Cosentino & Francesco Ferretti - 2014 - Topoi 33 (1):263-274.
    Classical cognitive science has been characterized by an association with the computational theory of mind. Although this association has produced highly significant results, it has also limited the scope of scientific psychology. In this paper, we analyse the limits of the specific kind of computational model represented by the Chomskian-Fodorian tradition in the study of mind and language. In our opinion, the adhesion to the principle of formality imposed by this specific computational model has motivated the exclusion of consciousness in (...)
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  2. Understanding Human Navigation Using Network Analysis.S. R. Sudarshan Iyengar, C. E. Veni Madhavan, A. Zweig Katharina & Natarajan Abhiram - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):121-134.
    We have considered a simple word game called the word-morph. After making our participants play a stipulated number of word-morph games, we have analyzed the experimental data. We have given a detailed analysis of the learning involved in solving this word game. We propose that people are inclined to learn landmarks when they are asked to navigate from a source to a destination. We note that these landmarks are nodes that have high closeness-centrality ranking.
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  3.  14
    Navigation Without Perception of Coordinates and Distances.Armin Hemmerling - 1994 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 40 (2):237-260.
    We consider the target-reaching problem in plane scenes for a point robot which has a tactile sensor and can locate the target ray. It might have a compass, too, but it is not able to perceive the coordinates of its position nor to measure distances. The complexity of an algorithm is measured by the number of straight moves until reaching the target, as a function of the number of vertices of the scene. It is shown how the target point can (...)
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  4.  18
    Cancer-Related Electronic Support Groups as Navigation-Aids: Overcoming Geographic Barriers.James E. Till - 2004 - Till, James E. (2004) Cancer-Related Electronic Support Groups as Navigation-Aids.
    Cancer-related electronic support groups (ESGs) may be regarded as a complement to face-to-face groups when the latter are available, and as an alternative when they are not. Advantages over face-to-face groups include an absence of barriers imposed by geographic location, opportunities for anonymity that permit sensitive issues to be discussed, and opportunities to find peers online. ESGs can be especially valuable as navigation aids for those trying to find a way through the healthcare system and as a guide to (...)
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  5.  39
    Evolutionary Pressures Promoting Complexity in Navigation and Communication.Dimitar Kazakov & Mark Bartlett - 2013 - Interaction Studies 14 (1):107-135.
    This article presents results from simulations studying the hypothesis that mechanisms for landmark-based navigation could have served as preadaptations for compositional language. It is argued that sharing directions would significantly have helped bridge the gap between general and language-specific cognitive faculties. A number of different levels of navigational and communicative abilities are considered, resulting in a range of possible evolutionary paths. The selective pressures for, resp. against, increased complexity in either faculty are then evaluated for a range of environments. (...)
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  6.  68
    Ontological Requirements for Annotation and Navigation of Philosophical Resources.Michele Pasin & Enrico Motta - 2011 - Synthese 182 (2):235-267.
    In this article, we describe an ontology aimed at the representation of the relevant entities and relations in the philosophical world. We will guide the reader through our modeling choices, so to highlight the ontology’s practical purpose: to enable an annotation of philosophical resources which is capable of supporting pedagogical navigation mechanisms. The ontology covers all the aspects of philosophy, thus including characterizations of entities such as people, events, documents, and ideas. In particular, here we will present a detailed (...)
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  7.  6
    Augmented Topological Maps for Three-Dimensional Navigation.Herbert Peremans & Dieter Vanderelst - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):560 - 561.
    We describe an augmented topological map as an alternative for the proposed bicoded map. Inverting causality, the special nature of the vertical dimension is then no longer fixed a priori and the cause of specific navigation behavior, but a consequence of the combination of the specific geometry of the experimental environment and the motor capabilities of the experimental animals.
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  8.  8
    Reasoning, Robots, and Navigation: Dual Roles for Deductive and Abductive Reasoning.Janet Wiles - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):92-92.
    Mercier & Sperber (M&S) argue for their argumentative theory in terms of communicative abilities. Insights can be gained by extending the discussion beyond human reasoning to rodent and robot navigation. The selection of arguments and conclusions that are mutually reinforcing can be cast as a form of abductive reasoning that I argue underlies the construction of cognitive maps in navigation tasks.
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  9.  5
    Navigation Bicoded as Functions of Xy and Time?James G. Phillips & Rowan P. Ogeil - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):561-562.
    Evidence from egocentric space is cited to support bicoding of navigation in three-dimensional space. Horizontal distances and space are processed differently from the vertical. Indeed, effector systems are compatible in horizontal space, but potentially incompatible (or chaotic) during transitions to vertical motion. Navigation involves changes in coordinates, and animal models of navigation indicate that time has an important role.
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  10.  4
    Making a Stronger Case for Comparative Research to Investigate the Behavioral and Neurological Bases of Three-Dimensional Navigation.Daniele Nardi & Verner P. Bingman - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):557 - 558.
    The rich diversity of avian natural history provides exciting possibilities for comparative research aimed at understanding three-dimensional navigation. We propose some hypotheses relating differences in natural history to potential behavioral and neurological adaptations possessed by contrasting bird species. This comparative approach may offer unique insights into some of the important questions raised by Jeffery et al.
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  11.  4
    Vertical and Veridical–2.5-Dimensional Visual and Vestibular Navigation.David Mw Powers - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):562 - 563.
    Does the psychological and neurological evidence concerning three-dimensional localization and navigation fly in the face of optimality? This commentary brings a computational and robotic engineering perspective to the question of and argues that a multicoding manifold model is more efficient in several senses, and is also likely to extend to animals, including birds or fish.
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  12.  3
    The Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex: Contrasting and Converging Contributions to Spatial Navigation and Memory.Shane M. O'Mara - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):469-470.
    Thach's target article presents a remarkable overview and integration of animal and human studies on the functions of the cerebellum and makes clear theoretical predictions for both the normal operation of the cerebellum and for the effects of cerebellar lesions in the mature human. Commentary is provided on three areas, namely, spatial navigation, implicit learning, and cerebellar agenesis to elicit further development of the themes already present in Thach's paper, [THACH].
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  13.  1
    Think Local, Act Global: How Do Fragmented Representations of Space Allow Seamless Navigation?Paul A. Dudchenko, Emma R. Wood & Roderick M. Grieves - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):548 - 549.
    In this commentary, we highlight a difficulty for metric navigation arising from recent data with grid and place cells: the integration of piecemeal representations of space in environments with repeated boundaries. Put simply, it is unclear how place and grid cells might provide a global representation of distance when their fields appear to represent repeated boundaries within an environment. One implication of this is that the capacity for spatial inferences may be limited.
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  14. Human Path Navigation in a Three-Dimensional World.Michael Barnett-Cowan & Heinrich H. Bülthoff - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):544-545.
    Jeffery et al. propose a non-uniform representation of three-dimensional space during navigation. Fittingly, we recently revealed asymmetries between horizontal and vertical path integration in humans. We agree that representing navigation in more than two dimensions increases computational load and suggest that tendencies to maintain upright head posture may help constrain computational processing, while distorting neural representation of three-dimensional navigation.
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  15. Gray-Box Model of Inland Navigation Channel: Application to the Cuinchy–Fontinettes Reach.Chuquet Karine, Puig Vicenç, Bolea Yolanda, Rajaoarisoa Lala, Blesa Joaquim, Duviella Eric & Horváth Klaudia - 2014 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 23 (2):183-199.
    In a context of global change, inland navigation transport has gained interest with economic and environmental benefits. The development of this means of conveyance requires the improvement of its management rules to deal with the increase of navigation and the potential impact of global change. To achieve this aim, it is first necessary to have a better knowledge about the dynamics of inland navigation networks and their interaction with the environment. Second, the potential effects of global change (...)
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  16. Systems and Artifacts: On a Material Semiotics of Navigation Dispositive.Pedro Xavier Mendonça - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (3):491-510.
    Neste artigo faz-se uma descrição do Sistema Global de Posicionamento e dos dispositivos de navegação de uso rodoviário que o constituem, enquanto artefatos, com vista a uma leitura semiótica destes últimos em articulação com a sistematicidade. De uma semiótica tradicional dos objetos passa-se a uma que se centra na sua materialidade, a partir da qual é possível detecar sentidos performativos na tecnologia. Esta abordagem permite uma compreensão mais detalhada do caráter global das tecnologias móveis em articulação com a sua individualização. (...)
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  17. Humanoid Robot Navigation: Getting Localization Information From Vision.Moutarde Fabien, de La Fortelle Arnaud, Bonnabel Silvère & Wirbel Emilie - 2014 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 23 (2):113-132.
    In this article, we present our work to provide a navigation and localization system on a constrained humanoid platform, the NAO robot, without modifying the robot sensors. First, we tried to implement a simple and light version of classic monocular Simultaneous Localization and Mapping algorithms, while adapting to the CPU and camera quality, which turned out to be insufficient on the platform for the moment. From our work on keypoints tracking, we identified that some keypoints can be still accurately (...)
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  18.  27
    Parahippocampal and Retrosplenial Contributions to Human Spatial Navigation.Russell A. Epstein - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (10):388.
  19.  8
    Updating Egocentric Representations in Human Navigation.Ranxiao Frances Wang & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2000 - Cognition 77 (3):215-250.
  20. Challenges for Identifying the Neural Mechanisms That Support Spatial Navigation: The Impact of Spatial Scale.Thomas Wolbers & Jan M. Wiener - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  21.  3
    Nonvisual Navigation by Blind and Sighted: Assessment of Path Integration Ability.Jack M. Loomis, Roberta L. Klatzky, Reginald G. Golledge, Joseph G. Cicinelli, James W. Pellegrino & Phyllis A. Fry - 1993 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (1):73.
  22.  23
    Navigation as a Source of Geometric Knowledge: Young Children's Use of Length, Angle, Distance, and Direction in a Reorientation Task.Sang Ah Lee, Valeria A. Sovrano & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):144-161.
  23. Kinesthetic and Vestibular Information Modulate Alpha Activity During Spatial Navigation: A Mobile EEG Study.Benedikt V. Ehinger, Petra Fischer, Anna L. Gert, Lilli Kaufhold, Felix Weber, Gordon Pipa & Peter König - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  24.  2
    Complementarity of Cognitive and Experiential Ways of Knowing the Ocean in Marshallese Navigation.Joseph Genz - 2014 - Ethos 42 (3):332-351.
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  25.  2
    Cognitive Effects of Language on Human Navigation.Anna Shusterman, Sang Ah Lee & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2011 - Cognition 120 (2):186-201.
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  26.  6
    The Study of Blindness and Technology Can Reveal the Mechanisms of Three-Dimensional Navigation.Achille Pasqualotto & Michael J. Proulx - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):559-560.
    Jeffery et al. suggest that three-dimensional environments are not represented according to their volumetric properties, but in a quasi-planar fashion. Here we take into consideration the role of visual experience and the use of technology for spatial learning to better understand the nature of the preference of horizontal over vertical spatial representation.
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  27.  37
    Theta Activity, Virtual Navigation and the Human Hippocampus.John O’Keefe & Neil Burgess - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):403-406.
  28. Can Active Navigation Be as Good as Driving? A Comparison of Spatial Memory in Drivers and Backseat Drivers.Rul von Stülpnagel & Melanie C. Steffens - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 18 (2):162-177.
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  29.  78
    The Young Sheep and the Sea: Early Navigation in the Mediterranean.G. Camps - 1986 - Diogenes 34 (136):19-45.
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  30. Evolved Navigation Theory and Horizontal Visual Illusions.Russell E. Jackson & Chéla R. Willey - 2011 - Cognition 119 (2):288-294.
  31.  25
    Learning to See: Merleau-Ponty and the Navigation of “Terrains”.Susan Bredlau - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:191-198.
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  32.  6
    The Effects of Maps on Navigation and Search Strategies in Very-Large-Scale Virtual Environments.Roy A. Ruddle, Stephen J. Payne & Dylan M. Jones - 1999 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 5 (1):54.
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  33. Is There a Geometric Module for Spatial Orientation? Insights From a Rodent Navigation Model.Denis Sheynikhovich, Ricardo Chavarriaga, Thomas Strösslin, Angelo Arleo & Wulfram Gerstner - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (3):540-566.
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  34.  4
    Cognitive Mapping in Mental Time Travel and Mental Space Navigation.Baptiste Gauthier & Virginie van Wassenhove - 2016 - Cognition 154:55-68.
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  35. Fearless-Evolution on Boolean Landscapes: Boolean Phase Portraits Reveal a New Navigation Strategy Based on Fearful Symmetry.Thomas E. Malloy, Jonathan Butner, Chase Dickerson & Joel M. Cooper - 2010 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 12 (3):65-95.
     
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  36.  17
    The Divided Circle: A History of Instruments for Astronomy, Navigation and Surveying.Ian Hacking - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):265-270.
  37. Navigation in the Western Carolines : A Traditional Science.Ward H. Goodenough - 2011 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader. Duke University Press. pp. 29--42.
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  38. Case Study of Kalman Filtering in the C-5 Aircraft Navigation System.S. F. Schmidt, J. P. Weinberg & J. S. Lukesh - 1968 - In Peter Koestenbaum (ed.), Proceedings. [San Jose? Calif..
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  39.  40
    The Place of Animal Being: Following Animal Embryogenesis and Navigation to the Hollow of Being in Merleau-Ponty.David Morris - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (2):188-218.
    This article pursues overlapping points about ontology, philosophical method, and our kinship with and difference from nonhuman animals. The ontological point is that being is determinately different in different places not because of differences, or even a space, already given in advance, but in virtue of a negative in being that is regional and rooted in place, which Mer-leau-Ponty calls the “hollow.” The methodological point is that we tend to miss this ontological point because we are inclined to what I (...)
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  40.  3
    Into the Wild: Neuroergonomic Differentiation of Hand-Held and Augmented Reality Wearable Displays During Outdoor Navigation with Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy.Ryan McKendrick, Raja Parasuraman, Rabia Murtza, Alice Formwalt, Wendy Baccus, Martin Paczynski & Hasan Ayaz - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  41.  9
    Transformative Navigation: Energizing Imagery for Perceptual Shifts.Margaret Dolinsky - 2009 - Technoetic Arts 7 (1):49-64.
  42.  7
    Towards a Moister Media, From Aquaponics to Multi-Scalar Navigation.Benjamin Pothier - 2014 - Technoetic Arts 12 (1):121-129.
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  43.  11
    The Organization of Human Spatial Memory and Implications for Route Planning and Navigation.Jan M. Wiener & Hanspeter A. Mallot - 2002 - Cognition 13 (3):208-217.
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  44.  11
    A Low-Cost Indoor Navigation System for Visually Impaired and Blind.Rosen S. Ivanov - 2011 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 44 (3):129.
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  45.  27
    From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category by Thomas Dixon. Cambridge University Press, 2003, 297pp., Hb ??45.00 the Navigation of Feeling: A Framework for the History of Emotions by William M. Reddy. Cambridge University Press, 2001, 380pp., Pb ??17.99. [REVIEW]Jane O'Grady - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (1):156-159.
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  46.  9
    Mental Models for the Navigation in Adaptive Web− Sites and Behavioral Complexity.Stephan Weibelzahl & Gerhard Weber - 2001 - Complexity 4 (57):17.
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  47.  5
    Which Animal Model for Understanding Human Navigation in a Three-Dimensional World?Guy A. Orban - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):558-559.
    Single-cell studies of monkey posterior parietal cortex (PPC) have revealed the extensive neuronal representations of three-dimensional subject motion and three-dimensional layout of the environment. I propose that navigational planning integrates this PPC information, including gravity signals, with horizontal-plane based information provided by the hippocampal formation, modified in primates by expansion of the ventral stream.
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  48.  8
    Signs and Maps–Cognitive Economy in the Use of External Aids for Indoor Navigation.Christoph Hölscher, Simon J. Büchner, Martin Brösamle, Tobias Meilinger & Gerhard Strube - 2007 - In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  49.  8
    Systematicity and Intentional Realism in Honeybee Navigation.Michael Tetzlafir & Georges Rey - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 72.
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  50.  8
    A Framework for Three-Dimensional Navigation Research.Kathryn J. Jeffery, Aleksandar Jovalekic, Madeleine Verriotis & Robin Hayman - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):571 - 587.
    We have argued that the neurocognitive representation of large-scale, navigable three-dimensional space is anisotropic, having different properties in vertical versus horizontal dimensions. Three broad categories organize the experimental and theoretical issues raised by the commentators: (1) frames of reference, (2) comparative cognition, and (3) the role of experience. These categories contain the core of a research program to show how three-dimensional space is represented and used by humans and other animals.
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