Results for 'Ned B. Lovell'

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  1.  10
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Glorianne M. Leck, Charles R. Schindler, Thomas A. Brindley, James J. Van Patten, Hult Jr, H. Michael Sokolow, Ronald K. Goodenow, Ned B. Lovell, Robert J. Skovira, Erskine S. Dottin, Roy Silver, W. Ross Palmer & Charles Vert Willie - 1980 - Educational Studies 11 (2):180-199.
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  2. Origins of the Synoptic Gospels: Some Basic Questions.Ned B. Stonehouse - 1963
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  3. Paul Before the Areopagus, and Other New Testament Studies.Ned B. Stonehouse - 1957
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  4. The Witness of Luke to Christ.Ned B. Stonehouse - 1951
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  5.  9
    The Growth of Basic Mathematical and Scientific Concepts in ChildrenOn Teaching MathematicsPopular Lectures in Mathematics. Parts 2, 4, 5, 6. [REVIEW]C. G. Nobbs, K. Lovell & B. Thwaites - 1962 - British Journal of Educational Studies 11 (1):80.
  6.  6
    Bribery and Blat in Russia: Negotiating Reciprocity From the Middle Ages to the 1990s.Stephen Lovell, Alena V. Ledeneva & A. B. Rogachevskiĭ (eds.) - 2000 - St. Martin's Press, in Association with School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London.
    For several centuries, the Russians have been famous for the number of transactions they conduct through unofficial channels. This book, the first sustained attempt to explain and analyze Russian society's reliance on unofficial "give-and-take," focuses especially on two key practices: bribery (the use of public office for private gain) and blat (the informal exchange of favors). It brings together specialists from a wide range of disciplines.
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  7.  12
    Understanding Research in EducationEducational Research Methods.B. C. Bloomfield, K. Lovell, K. S. Lawson, J. D. Nisbet & N. J. Entwistle - 1970 - British Journal of Educational Studies 18 (3):341.
  8. Time.Ned Markosian - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Discussions of the nature of time, and of various issues related to time, have always featured prominently in philosophy, but they have been especially important since the beginning of the 20th Century. This article contains a brief overview of some of the main topics in the philosophy of time — Fatalism; Reductionism and Platonism with respect to time; the topology of time; McTaggart's arguments; The A Theory and The B Theory; Presentism, Eternalism, and The Growing Universe Theory; time travel; and (...)
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  9. Book Review: Discerning God's Will. [REVIEW]Arnold B. Lovell - 1992 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 46 (4):430-430.
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  10.  1
    Book Review: The Great Commission: Biblical Models for Evangelism. [REVIEW]Arnold B. Lovell - 1995 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 49 (1):110-111.
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  11. Emerging Cosmology #1 898.B. Lovell - 1981 - Columbia University Press.
  12.  1
    I Corinthians 13.Arnold B. Lovell - 1994 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 48 (2):176-180.
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  13.  4
    Physiological and Motor Responses to a Regularly Recurring Sound: A Study in Monotony.G. D. Lovell & J. J. B. Morgan - 1942 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (6):435.
  14.  6
    Review of Ueber die Beziehungen zwischen ermudung, raumsinn der haut, und muskelleistung. [REVIEW]G. B. Lovell - 1903 - Psychological Review 10 (4):452-453.
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  15.  1
    LXXV. The Low Frequency Spectrum of the Cygnus and Cassiopeia Radio Sources.R. J. Lamden & A. C. B. Lovell - 1956 - Philosophical Magazine 1 (8):725-737.
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  16.  3
    The Importance of Academic Deans' Interpersonal/Negotiating Skills as Leaders.Shelley B. Wepner, William A. Henk, Virginia Clark Johnson & Sharon Lovell - 2014 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 18 (4):124-130.
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  17.  18
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Liston, Richard R. Renner, Judy Holzman, Cameron Mccarthy, Michael W. Apple, William M. Stallings, Kathryn M. Borman, David Hursh, Joseph L. Devitis, Peter A. Sola, Chris Eisele, Ned Lovell, Michael A. Olivas, Alan Wieder, Robert Zuber & Richard E. Sullivan - 1986 - Educational Studies 17 (4):598-661.
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  18. If Perception is Probabilistic, Why Doesn't It Seem Probabilistic?Ned Block - 2018 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 373 (1755).
    The success of the Bayesian approach to perception suggests probabilistic perceptual representations. But if perceptual representation is probabilistic, why doesn't normal conscious perception reflect the full probability distributions that the probabilistic point of view endorses? For example, neurons in MT/V5 that respond to the direction of motion are broadly tuned: a patch of cortex that is tuned to vertical motion also responds to horizontal motion, but when we see vertical motion, foveally, in good conditions, it does not look at all (...)
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  19. Critical Study of Robin Lepoidevin (Ed.), Questions of Time and Tense.Ned Markosian - 2001 - Noûs 35 (4):616-629.
    Some people think that pastness, presentness and futurity (and their metric variants, such as being two days past) are genuine propeties of times and events. These putative properties are sometimes called “A properties” and the philosopers who believe in them are often called “A Theorists.” Other philosophers don’t believe in the reality of A properties, but instead say that talk that appears to be about such properties is really about “B relations” – two-place temporal relations like earlier than, simultaneous with, (...)
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  20. Russia's Constitutional Revolution: Legal Consciousness and the Transition to Democracy, 1985-1996. By Robert B. Ahdieh. [REVIEW]D. W. Lovell - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:120-120.
     
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  21.  27
    The Dyscolos Twice More Walther Kraus: Menanders Dyskolos. (Sitz. d. Öster. Akad. d. Wiss., 234, 4.) Pp. 126. Vienna: H. Böhlaus Nachf., 1960. Paper, 85 Sch. B. A. van Groningen: Le Dyscolos de Ménandre, Étude critique du texte. (Verhand. d. K. Ned. Akad., N.R. lxvii. 3.) Pp. 160. Amsterdam: Noord-Hollandsche Uitgevers Mij., 1960. Paper, fl. 20. [REVIEW]F. H. Sandbach - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (01):23-26.
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  22.  60
    Anna Goppel: Killing Terrorists: A Legal and Moral Analysis: Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter 2013, 328 Pages, ISBN: 978-3-11-027727-2, € 64,95.Ned Dobos - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (3):671-672.
    Targeted killing has become a staple tactic in the “war in terror”. Since the beginning of the second Intifada, Israel is estimated to have killed over four hundred Palestinians in targeted strikes, while the US has killed over two thousand in Pakistan alone since 2004. These statistics include the deaths of innocent bystanders caught in the wrong place at the wrong time—“collateral damage”—as well as the deaths of the terrorists themselves. Be that as it may, the American and Israeli publics (...)
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  23. Review of Peter Ludlow, Semantics, Tense, and Time. [REVIEW]Ned Markosian - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (6):325-329.
    This is not your typical book about the A-theory/B-theory controversy in metaphysics. Peter Ludlow attempts something that few philosophers have tried in the last thirty years: he actually argues from linguistic premises for metaphysical conclusions. The relevant linguistic premises have to do with the nature of language, a general theory of semantics, the proper analysis of tense, and various technical theses involving the treatment of temporal indexicals and temporal anaphora. The metaphysical conclusions that Ludlow argues for from these linguistic premises (...)
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  24. A-Theory for B-Theorists.Josh Parsons - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):1-20.
    The debate between A-theory and B-theory in the philosophy of time is a persistent one. It is not always clear, however, what the terms of this debate are. A-theorists are often lumped with a miscellaneous collection of heterodox doctrines: the view that only the present exists, that time flows relentlessly, or that presentness is a property (Williams 1996); that time passes, tense is unanalysable, or that earlier than and later than are defined in terms of pastness, presentness, and futurity (Bigelow (...)
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  25.  5
    The Lynching and Rebirth of Ned Buntline: Rogue Authorship During the American Literary Renaissance.Mark Metzler Sawin - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):167-184.
    Though largely unknown today, “Ned Buntline” was one of the most influential authors of 19th-century America. He published over 170 novels, edited multiple popular and political publications, and helped pioneer the seafaring adventure, city mystery and Western genres. It was his pirate tales that Tom Sawyer constantly reenacted, his “Bowery B’hoys” that came to define the distinctive slang and swagger of urban American characters, and his novels and plays that turned an unknown scout into Buffalo Bill, King of the Border (...)
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  26.  16
    Defeating the Whole Purpose: A Critique of Ned Markosian's Agent-Causal Compatibilism.Robert Allen - manuscript
    Positions taken in the current debate over free will can be seen as responses to the following conditional: -/- If every action is caused solely by another event and a cause necessitates its effect, then there is no action to which there is an alternative (C). -/- The Libertarian, who believes that alternatives are a requirement of free will, responds by denying the right conjunct of C’s antecedent, maintaining that some actions are caused, either mediately or immediately, by events whose (...)
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  27. Subtracting “Ought” From “Is”: Descriptivism Versus Normativism in the Study of Human Thinking.Shira Elqayam & Jonathan St B. T. Evans - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):251-252.
    We propose a critique of normativism, defined as the idea that human thinking reflects a normative system against which it should be measured and judged. We analyze the methodological problems associated with normativism, proposing that it invites the controversial “is-ought” inference, much contested in the philosophical literature. This problem is triggered when there are competing normative accounts (the arbitration problem), as empirical evidence can help arbitrate between descriptive theories, but not between normative systems. Drawing on linguistics as a model, we (...)
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  28.  61
    Reliabilists Should Still Fear the Demon.B. J. C. Madison - 2021 - Logos and Episteme 2 (12):193-202.
    In its most basic form, Simple Reliabilism states that: a belief is justified iff it is formed as the result of a reliable belief-forming process. But so-called New Evil Demon (NED) cases have been given as counterexamples. A common response has been to complicate reliabilism from its simplest form to accommodate the basic reliabilist position, while at the same time granting the force of NED intuitions. But what if despite initial appearances, Simple Reliabilism, without qualification, is compatible with the NED (...)
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  29.  6
    Markosian’s Sideways Music and Aesthetic Value Gluts.Jeremiah Joven B. Joaquin - forthcoming - Acta Analytica:1-9.
    In “Sideways Music”, Ned Markosian presents the aesthetic value variance of sideways music as a case against what the Spacetime Thesis—the thesis that time is one of four similar dimensions that make up spacetime. Critics have already raised worries about the premises of his argument. In this paper, I focus on Markosian’s assumed aesthetic realism. I argue that there is a version of aesthetic realism—a version that admits aesthetic value gluts—that is consistent with both the Spacetime Thesis and the aesthetic (...)
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  30. Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors.Diego Fernandez-Duque - 2002 - Review of General Psychology 6 (2):153-165.
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what atten- tion is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) --cause-- theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) --effect-- theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition meta- phor); and (c) hybrid theories that combine (...)
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  31. Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Problem of Change.Ryan Wasserman - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (3):283-286.
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that the (...)
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  32.  57
    Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors.Mark L. Johnson - unknown
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what attention is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) “cause” theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) “effect” theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition metaphor); and (c) hybrid theories that combine cause and (...)
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  33.  63
    Time and Identity.Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.) - 2010 - Bradford.
    The concepts of time and identity seem at once unproblematic and frustratingly difficult. Time is an intricate part of our experience -- it would seem that the passage of time is a prerequisite for having any experience at all -- and yet recalcitrant questions about time remain. Is time real? Does time flow? Do past and future moments exist? Philosophers face similarly stubborn questions about identity, particularly about the persistence of identical entities through change. Indeed, questions about the metaphysics of (...)
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  34. Relevance Logics, Paradoxes Of Consistency And The K Rule Ii.José Méndez & Gemma Robles - 2006 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 15:175-191.
    The logic B+ is Routley and Meyer’s basic positive logic. Wedefine the logics BK+ and BK′+ by adding to B+ the K rule and to BK+the characteristic S4 axiom, respectively. These logics are endowed witha relatively strong non-constructive negation. We prove that all the logicsdefined lack the K axiom and the standard paradoxes of consistency.
     
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  35. How to Find the Neural Correlate of Consciousness*: Ned Block.Ned Block - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:23-34.
    There are two concepts of consciousness that are easy to confuse with one another, access-consciousness and phenomenal consciousness. However, just as the concepts of water and H 2 O are different concepts of the same thing, so the two concepts of consciousness may come to the same thing in the brain. The focus of this paper is on the problems that arise when these two concepts of consciousness are conflated. I will argue that John Searle's reasoning about the function of (...)
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  36. Phenomenal and Access Consciousness Ned Block and Cynthia MacDonald: Consciousness and Cognitive Access.Ned Block - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):289 - 317.
  37. Conceptual Analysis, Dualism, and the Explanatory Gap.Ned Block & Robert Stalnaker - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):1-46.
    The explanatory gap . Consciousness is a mystery. No one has ever given an account, even a highly speculative, hypothetical, and incomplete account of how a physical thing could have phenomenal states. Suppose that consciousness is identical to a property of the brain, say activity in the pyramidal cells of layer 5 of the cortex involving reverberatory circuits from cortical layer 6 to the thalamus and back to layers 4 and 6,as Crick and Koch have suggested for visual consciousness. .) (...)
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  38. Brutal Composition.Ned Markosian - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 92 (3):211 - 249.
    According to standard, pre-philosophical intuitions, there are many composite objects in the physical universe. There is, for example, my bicycle, which is composed of various parts - wheels, handlebars, molecules, atoms, etc. Recently, a growing body of philosophical literature has concerned itself with questions about the nature of composition.1 The main question that has been raised about composition is, roughly, this: Under what circumstances do some things compose, or add up to, or form, a single object? It turns out that (...)
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  39.  59
    Conceptual Analysis, Dualism, and the Explanatory Gap.Ned Block & Robert Stalnaker - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):1-46.
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  40. Two Concepts of Causation.Ned Hall - 2004 - In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. MIT Press. pp. 225-276.
  41. A Defense of Presentism.Ned Markosian - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 1:47-82.
    ∗ Apologies to Mark Hinchliff for stealing the title of his dissertation. (See Hinchliff, A Defense of Presentism. As it turns out, however, the version of Presentism defended here is different from the version defended by Hinchliff. See Section 3.1 below.).
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  42. Unary Quantification Revisited.Bart Geurts - unknown
    It is well known that most is not first-order definable, and that the proof is in Barwise and Cooper’s 1981 paper. Actually, Barwise and Cooper present two theorems that bear on the issue. Their theorem C12 says that, for any pair of one-place predicates A and B, there is no sentence of classical predicate logic that is true iff ‘Most A are B’ is. (I assume that ‘Most A are B’ means that more than half of the A’s are B, (...)
     
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  43. Two Mistakes About Credence and Chance.Ned Hall - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):93 – 111.
    David Lewis's influential work on the epistemology and metaphysics of objective chance has convinced many philosophers of the central importance of the following two claims: First, it is a serious cost of reductionist positions about chance (such as that occupied by Lewis) that they are, apparently, forced to modify the Principal Principle--the central principle relating objective chance to rational subjective probability--in order to avoid contradiction. Second, it is a perhaps more serious cost of the rival non-reductionist position that, unlike reductionism, (...)
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  44.  19
    Causation: A User’s Guide.L. A. Paul & Ned Hall - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Causation is at once familiar and mysterious. Neither common sense nor extensive philosophical debate has led us to anything like agreement on the correct analysis of the concept of causation, or an account of the metaphysical nature of the causal relation. Causation: A User's Guide cuts a clear path through this confusing but vital landscape. L. A. Paul and Ned Hall guide the reader through the most important philosophical treatments of causation, negotiating the terrain by taking a set of examples (...)
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  45. On a Confusion About a Function of Consciousness.Ned Block - 1995 - Brain and Behavioral Sciences 18 (2):227-–247.
    Consciousness is a mongrel concept: there are a number of very different "consciousnesses." Phenomenal consciousness is experience; the phenomenally conscious aspect of a state is what it is like to be in that state. The mark of access-consciousness, by contrast, is availability for use in reasoning and rationally guiding speech and action. These concepts are often partly or totally conflated, with bad results. This target article uses as an example a form of reasoning about a function of "consciousness" based on (...)
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  46. Humean Reductionism About Laws of Nature.Ned Hall - 2009
  47. Correcting the Guide to Objective Chance.Ned Hall - 1994 - Mind 103 (412):505-518.
  48. A Spatial Approach to Mereology.Ned Markosian - 2014 - In Shieva Keinschmidt (ed.), Mereology and Location. Oxford University Press.
    When do several objects compose a further object? The last twenty years have seen a great deal of discussion of this question. According to the most popular view on the market, there is a physical object composed of your brain and Jeremy Bentham’s body. According to the second-most popular view on the market, there are no such objects as human brains or human bodies, and there are also no atoms, rocks, tables, or stars. And according to the third-ranked view, there (...)
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  49. Causation and the Price of Transitivity.Ned Hall - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):198.
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  50. Structural Equations and Causation.Ned Hall - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (1):109 - 136.
    Structural equations have become increasingly popular in recent years as tools for understanding causation. But standard structural equations approaches to causation face deep problems. The most philosophically interesting of these consists in their failure to incorporate a distinction between default states of an object or system, and deviations therefrom. Exploring this problem, and how to fix it, helps to illuminate the central role this distinction plays in our causal thinking.
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