Results for 'Neil Alan Manson'

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  1.  17
    Thinking, Relating and Choosing: Resolving the issue of Faith, Ethics and the Existential Responsibility.Neil Alan Soggie - 2009 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (2):1-5.
    Which is worse: Doing evil or being evil? If we are free to define ourselves through our choices, as existentialism posits, then the latter is worse. This paper attempts to resolve the issue of the difference between religious (group) ethics and the ethics of a person of faith that embraces individuals with an existential understanding. In the existential view, the individual (whether the self or the other) is the primary concern, and so the issue of personal relational morality supersedes religious (...)
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  2. Fear of Looking at the Self. A Phenomenological Analysis of Self Evaluation Anxiety in Education.Neil Alan Soggie - 2009 - ENCYCLOPAIDEIA 13 (26):73-84.
     
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  3.  14
    Logotherapy: Viktor Frankl, Life and Work.Neil Alan Soggie - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Following World War II, Viktor Frankl revolutionized the field of psychotherapy with the inception of logotherapy. With Logotherapy: Viktor Frankl, Life and Work, Soggie offers a compelling and comprehensive introduction to both the man and his contribution to psychotherapy. Through the examination of Frankl’s life as a boy to his days in a concentration camp and his post-war work, Soggie paints a rich portrait of Frankl and the origins of logotherapy. Complete with in-depth explanations of logotherapy’s key concepts, including dimensionalism, (...)
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  4.  7
    Existo: Worldview and a Meaningful Existence.Neil Alan Soggie - 2005 - Upa.
    Existo examines the tripod of meaning that guides how we intuitively apprehend and interpret the universe. Through this view, we interact with the world to create personal meaning. It is a poetic experience where our existence and its meaning emerges out of a relationship between our source, our work, and our mortality.
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  5. Rethinking informed consent in bioethics.Neil C. Manson - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Onora O'Neill.
    Informed consent is a central topic in contemporary biomedical ethics. Yet attempts to set defensible and feasible standards for consenting have led to persistent difficulties. In Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics Neil Manson and Onora O'Neill set debates about informed consent in medicine and research in a fresh light. They show why informed consent cannot be fully specific or fully explicit, and why more specific consent is not always ethically better. They argue that consent needs distinctive communicative transactions, (...)
  6. Formulating the Precautionary Principle.Neil A. Manson - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (3):263-274.
    In part one, I identify the core logical structure of the precautionary principle and distinguish it from the various key concepts that appear in the many different formulations of the principle. I survey these concepts and suggest a program of further conceptual analysis. In part two, I examine a particular version of the precautionary principle dubbed “the catastrophe principle” and criticize it in light of its similarities to the principle at work in Pascal’s Wager. I conclude with some suggestions for (...)
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  7.  53
    Freud's own blend: Functional analysis, idiographic explanation, and the extension of ordinary psychology.Neil C. Manson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):179–195.
    If we are to understand why psychoanalysis extends ordinary psychology in the precise ways that it does, we must take account of the existence of, and the interplay between, two distinct kinds of explanatory concern: functional and idiographic. The form and content of psychoanalytic explanation and its unusual methodology can, at least in part, be viewed as emerging out of Freud's attempt to reconcile these two types of explanatory concern. We must also acknowledge the role of the background theoretical context (...)
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  8.  38
    The design argument.Neil Manson - manuscript
    If you have taken a college biology class, or just watched Animal Planet, you may have been struck by the startling complexity of living organisms. From the grandest mammal to the lowliest cell, life displays intricacy and structure that would put a high-paid team of engineers to shame. How could such fantastically organized, complex structures arise blindly out of unintelligent matter? Speaking of matter, why is it the way it is? Though unimaginably vast, our universe has precise features, as does (...)
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  9.  20
    The ethics of biobanking: Assessing the right to control problem for broad consent.Neil C. Manson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):540-549.
    The biobank consent debate is one with deeply held convictions on both the ‘broad’ and ‘specific’ side with little sign of resolution. Recently, Thomas Ploug and Soren Holm have developed an alternative to both specific and broad consent: a meta‐consent framework. The aim here is to consider whether meta‐consent provides a ‘solution’ to the biobank consent debate. We clarify what ‘meta‐consent’ actually is (arguing that the label is a misnomer and ‘consent à la carte’ is more accurate). We identify problems (...)
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  10.  29
    First‐Person Authority: An Epistemic‐Pragmatic Account.Neil C. Manson - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (2):181-199.
    Some self-ascriptions of belief, desire and other attitudes exhibit first-person authority. The aim here is to offer a novel account of this kind of first-person authority. The account is a development of Robert Gordon's ascent routine theory but is framed in terms of our ability to bring it about that others know of our attitudes via speech acts which do not deploy attitudinal vocabulary but which nonetheless ‘show’ our attitudes to others. Unlike Gordon's ascent routine theory, the theory readily applies (...)
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  11. Permissive consent: a robust reason-changing account.Neil Manson - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3317-3334.
    There is an ongoing debate about the “ontology” of consent. Some argue that it is a mental act, some that it is a “hybrid” of a mental act plus behaviour that signifies that act; others argue that consent is a performative, akin to promising or commanding. Here it is argued that all these views are mistaken—though some more so than others. We begin with the question whether a normatively efficacious act of consent can be completed in the mind alone. Standard (...)
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  12.  67
    Normative consent is not consent.Neil Manson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):33-44.
  13. A future for presentism - by Craig Bourne.Neil A. Manson - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (1):65-67.
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  14.  82
    Cosmic fine-tuning, 'many universe' theories, and the goodness of life.Neil A. Manson - unknown
    This volume addresses the role value judgments play in science. It is my contention that a particular research programme in modern physical cosmology rests crucially on a value judgment. Before making my case, let me introduce the following abbreviations for the following propositions.
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  15.  35
    Making Sense of Spin.Neil C. Manson - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):200-213.
    “Spin” is a pejorative term for a ubiquitous form of communication. Spin is viewed by many as deceptive, and by others as bending or twisting the truth. But spin need not be deceptive and the metaphors are less than clear. The aim here is to clarify what spin is: spin is identified as a form of selective claim-making, where the process of selection is governed by an intention to bring about promotional perlocutionary effects. The process of selection may pertain to (...)
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  16.  36
    How not to think about genetic information.Neil C. Manson - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):3-3.
  17.  78
    How Not to Think about the Ethics of Deceiving into Sex.Neil C. Manson - 2017 - Ethics 127 (2):415-429.
    It is widely held that some kinds of deception into sex (e.g., lying about what pets one likes) do not undermine the moral force of consent while other kinds of deception do (e.g., impersonating the consenter’s partner). Tom Dougherty argues against this: whenever someone is deceived into sex by the concealment of a “deal breaker” fact, the normative situation is the same as there being no consent at all. Here it is argued that this conclusion is unwarranted. Dougherty’s negative arguments (...)
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  18.  51
    The 'why design?' Question.Neil A. Manson - 2008 - In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New waves in philosophy of religion. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 68.
  19.  43
    The biobank consent debate: Why ‘meta-consent’ is not the solution?Neil C. Manson - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):291-294.
    Over the past couple of decades, there has been an ongoing, often fierce, debate about the ethics of biobank participation. One central element of that debate has concerned the nature of informed consent, must specific reconsent be gained for each new use, or user, or is broad consent ethically adequate? Recently, Thomas Ploug and Søren Holm have developed an alternative to both specific and broad consent: what they call a meta-consent framework. On a meta-consent framework, participants can choose the type (...)
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  20.  26
    Essay: Why do patients want information if not to take part in decision making?Neil Manson - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):834-837.
    There is empirical evidence that many patients want information about treatment options even though they do not want to take a full part in decision-making about treatment. Such evidence may have considerable ethical implications but is methodologically problematic. It is argued here that, in fact, it is not at all surprising that patients' informational interests should be separable from their interests in decision-making. A number of different reasons for wanting information are offered, some to do with the content of information; (...)
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  21.  28
    Political self-deception and epistemic vice.Neil C. Manson - 2020 - Ethics and Global Politics 13 (4):6-15.
  22. Cosmic Fine‐Tuning, the Multiverse Hypothesis, and the Inverse gambler's Fallacy.Neil A. Manson - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (9):e12873.
    The multiverse hypothesis is one of the leading proposed explanations of cosmic fine-tuning for life. One common objection to the multiverse hypothesis is that, even if it were true, it would not explain why this universe, our universe, is fine-tuned for life. To think it would so explain is allegedly to commit “the inverse gambler's fallacy.” This paper presents what the inverse gambler's fallacy is supposed to be, then surveys the discussion of it in the philosophical literature of the last (...)
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  23.  52
    Transitional Paternalism: How Shared Normative Powers Give Rise to the Asymmetry of Adolescent Consent and Refusal.Neil C. Manson - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (2):66-73.
    In many jurisdictions, adolescents acquire the right to consent to treatment; but in some cases their refusals – e.g. of life-saving treatment – may not be respected. This asymmetry of adolescent consent and refusal seems puzzling, even incoherent. The aim here is to offer an original explanation, and a justification, of this asymmetry. Rather than trying to explain the asymmetry in terms of a variable standard of competence – where the adolescent is competent to consent to, but not refuse, certain (...)
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  24. The scope of consent.Neil C. Manson - 2018 - In Peter Schaber & Andreas Müller (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Consent. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
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  25. Epistemic restraint and the vice of curiosity.Neil C. Manson - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (2):239-259.
    In recent years there has been wide-ranging discussion of epistemic virtues. Given the value and importance of acquiring knowledge this discussion has tended to focus upon those traits that are relevant to the acquisition of knowledge. This acquisitionist focus ignores or downplays the importance of epistemic restraint: refraining from seeking knowledge. In contrast, in many periods of history, curiosity was viewed as a vice. By drawing upon critiques of curiositas in Middle Platonism and Early Christian philosophy, we gain useful insights (...)
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  26.  15
    Response to “Animal Interrupted”.Neil A. Manson - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (S1):134-139.
    Strong conventionalism goes wrong well before cases of transfiguration even arise. Assuming it is a “rock-bottom” form of conventionalism, it cannot deliver on its promise to resolve the classic transporter case. In the classic transporter case, the transported individual is not specified as being a member of any person-determining community, and so there is no fact of the matter whether the transported individual survives.
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  27.  33
    Consent in the law – by Deryck Beyleveld & Roger Brownsword.Neil C. Manson - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):215-217.
  28. The fine-tuning argument.Neil A. Manson - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):271-286.
    The Fine-Tuning Argument (FTA) is a variant of the Design Argument for the existence of God. In this paper the evidence of fine-tuning is explained and the Fine-Tuning Design Argument for God is presented. Then two objections are covered. The first objection is that fine-tuning can be explained in terms of the existence of multiple universes (the 'multiverse') plus the operation of the anthropic principle. The second objection is the 'normalizability problem'– the objection that the Fine-Tuning Argument fails because fine-tuning (...)
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  29.  23
    Freud's Own Blend: Functional Analysis, Idiographic Explanation, and the Extension of Ordinary Psychology.Neil C. Manson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):179-195.
    If we are to understand why psychoanalysis extends ordinary psychology in the precise ways that it does, we must take account of the existence of, and the interplay between, two distinct kinds of explanatory concern: functional and idiographic. The form and content of psychoanalytic explanation and its unusual methodology can, at least in part, be viewed as emerging out of Freud's attempt to reconcile these two types of explanatory concern. We must also acknowledge the role of the background theoretical context (...)
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  30.  19
    Contemporary naturalism and the concept of consciousness.Neil C. Manson - unknown
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  31.  21
    Reason explanation:a first-order normative account.Neil C. Manson - unknown
    How do reason explanations explain? One view is that they require the deployment of a tacit psychological theory; another is that even if no tacit theory is involved, we must still conceive of reasons as mental states. By focusing on the subjective nature of agency, and by casting explanations as responses to why questions that assuage agents puzzlement, reason explanations can be profitably understood as part of our traffic in first-order content amongst perspectival subjects. An outline is offered of such (...)
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  32. God and design: the teleological argument and modern science.Neil A. Manson (ed.) - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    Recent discoveries in physics, cosmology and biochemistry have captured the public imagination and made the Design Argument - the theory that God created the world according to a specific plan - the object of renewed scientific and philosophical interest. This accessible but serious introduction to the design problem brings together new perspectives from prominent scientists and philosophers including Paul Davies, Richard Swinburne, Sir Martin Rees, Michael Behe, Elliot Sober and Peter van Inwagen.
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  33.  8
    Review. The engine of reason, the seat of the soul: a philosophical journey into the brain. Paul M Churchland.Neil Manson - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):633-635.
  34.  40
    Informed consent and referential opacity.Neil Manson - unknown
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  35.  40
    Introduction to God and design.Neil Manson - manuscript
    This introduction has two functions. First, it apprises readers of some of the basic data, terminology, and formalisms used in contemporary discussions of the design argument while also giving a sense of the argument's history. Other pieces in this anthology – particularly those of Elliott Sober, John Leslie, Paul Davies, and Michael Ruse – cover some of the same ground. Second, it gives readers some idea of what the various contributors will say and why their contributions are important for understanding (...)
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  36. Fine-Tuning, Multiple Universes, and the 'This Universe' Objection.Neil Manson - 2003 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):67 - 83.
    When it is suggested that the fine‐tuning of the universe for life provides evidence for a cosmic designer, the multiple‐universe hypothesis is often presented as an alternative. Some philosophers object that the multiple‐universe hypothesis fails to explain why this universe is fine‐tuned for life. We suggest the “This Universe” objection is no better than the “This Planet” objection. We also fault proponents of the “This Universe” objection for presupposing that we could not have existed in any other universe and that (...)
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  37. There is no adequate definition of ?Fine-tuned for life?Neil A. Manson - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):341 – 351.
    The discovery that the universe is fine-tuned for life ? a discovery to which the phrase ?the anthropic principle? is often applied ? has prompted much extra-cosmic speculation by philosophers, theologians, and theoretical physicists. Such speculation is referred to as extra-cosmic because an inference is made to the existence either of one unobservable entity that is distinct from the cosmos and any of its parts (God) or of many such entities (multiple universes). In this article a case is mounted for (...)
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  38. Fine-tuning, multiple universes, and the "this universe" objection.Neil A. Manson & Michael J. Thrush - 2003 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):67–83.
    When it is suggested that the fine‐tuning of the universe for life provides evidence for a cosmic designer, the multiple‐universe hypothesis is often presented as an alternative. Some philosophers object that the multiple‐universe hypothesis fails to explain why this universe is fine‐tuned for life. We suggest the “This Universe” objection is no better than the “This Planet” objection. We also fault proponents of the “This Universe” objection for presupposing that we could not have existed in any other universe and that (...)
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  39.  18
    Why Shouldn’t Insurance Companies Know Your Genetic Information?Neil A. Manson - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (9999):345-356.
    In this paper I state and reject two of the most commonly given arguments for regulating access by insurance companies to the results of genetic tests. I then argue that since we cannot assume a priori that those genetically predisposed to disease will have worse health outcomes than those not so disposed, we cannot know a priori that genetic discrimination will emerge as a major problem in a free market health insurance system. Finally, I explore the possibility of a free-market (...)
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  40.  15
    Consciousness and the unconscious.Neil Manson - unknown
  41.  27
    Epistemic consciousness.Neil Campbell Manson - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (3):425-441.
  42.  22
    1 introduction.Neil Manson - unknown
    give just two examples, the Paradox of the Stone is racy’. (1987, p. 106) said to show the impossibility of omnipotence, while an array of arguments try to show the incom-.
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  43.  39
    Informed consent.Neil Manson - unknown
    Informed consent is a central concept of contemporary medical ethics. Clinicians and medical researchers are under an obligation to inform patients and research subjects about the nature, purposes, risks, and side effects of proposed courses of action. A vast body of literature has been produced, over the past 30 years or so, about the nature, justification, scope, and limits of informed consent. Here we will focus on what informed consent is, how it came to have a central place in medical (...)
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  44. God and Design: The Teleological Argument and Modern Science.Neil A. Manson - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 57 (2):139-142.
     
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  45.  69
    Normative Consent Is Not Consent.Neil C. Manson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):33-44.
  46.  32
    The design argument and natural theology.Neil A. Manson - 2013 - In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up. pp. 295.
    In the broadest sense, natural theology is the effort to gain knowledge of God from non-revealed sources – that is, from sources other than scripture and religious experience – but there is also a much narrower sense of natural theology: the construction of arguments for the existence of God from empirical evidence. This narrower sense is most strongly associated with the argument for God's existence from the appearance that the natural world has been constructed for a purpose. This argument is (...)
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  47.  27
    The case against meta-consent: not only do Ploug and Holm not answer_ it, they make it _even stronger.Neil C. Manson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (9):627-628.
    In a recent article, I argued that Ploug and Holm’s ‘meta-consent’ proposal should be rejected for biobank governance. This was because, although meta-consent is permissible, it is both burdensome and ethically omissible. There is no ethical reason why funders should undertake the additional costs. Ploug and Holm have sought to respond to these arguments. Here, it is noted that not only do they fail to adequately refuse the case against meta-consent, they fail to even engage with the arguments, either misunderstanding (...)
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  48. Cosmic fine-tuning, 'many universe' theories, and the goodness of life.Neil A. Manson - 2003 - In Willem B. Drees (ed.), Is nature ever evil?: religion, science, and value. New York: Routledge. pp. 100--139.
     
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  49.  60
    What is genetic information, and why is it significant? A contextual, contrastive, approach.Neil C. Manson - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):1–16.
    Is genetic information of special ethical significance? Does it require special regulation? There is considerable contemporary debate about this question (the genetic exceptionalism debate). Genetic information is an ambiguous term and, as an aid to avoiding conflation in the genetic exceptionalism debate, a detailed account is given of just how and why genetic information is ambiguous. Whilst ambiguity is a ubiquitous problem of communication, it is suggested that genetic information is ambiguous in a particular way, one that gives rise to (...)
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  50.  20
    What is genetic information, and why is it significant? : a contextual, contrastive, approach.Neil C. Manson - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):1-16.
    Is genetic information of special ethical significance? Does it require special regulation? There is considerable contemporary debate about this question. Genetic information is an ambiguous term and, as an aid to avoiding conflation in the genetic exceptionalism debate, a detailed account is given of just how and why genetic information is ambiguous. Whilst ambiguity is a ubiquitous problem of communication, it is suggested that genetic information is ambiguous in a particular way, one that gives rise to the problem of significance (...)
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