Results for 'Neil Sutherland'

993 found
Order:
  1.  16
    The identification of 100 ecological questions of high policy relevance in the UK.William J. Sutherland, Susan Armstrong-Brown, Paul R. Armsworth, Brereton Tom, Jonathan Brickland, Colin D. Campbell, Daniel E. Chamberlain, Andrew I. Cooke, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Nicholas R. Dusic, Martin Fitton, Robert P. Freckleton, H. Charles J. Godfray, Nick Grout, H. John Harvey, Colin Hedley, John J. Hopkins, Neil B. Kift, Jeff Kirby, William E. Kunin, David W. Macdonald, Brian Marker, Marc Naura, Andrew R. Neale, Tom Oliver, Dan Osborn, Andrew S. Pullin, Matthew E. A. Shardlow, David A. Showler, Paul L. Smith, Richard J. Smithers, Jean-Luc Solandt, Jonathan Spencer, Chris J. Spray, Chris D. Thomas, Jim Thompson, Sarah E. Webb, Derek W. Yalden & Andrew R. Watkinson - 2006 - Journal of Applied Ecology 43 (4):617-627.
    1 Evidence-based policy requires researchers to provide the answers to ecological questions that are of interest to policy makers. To find out what those questions are in the UK, representatives from 28 organizations involved in policy, together with scientists from 10 academic institutions, were asked to generate a list of questions from their organizations. 2 During a 2-day workshop the initial list of 1003 questions generated from consulting at least 654 policy makers and academics was used as a basis for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  18
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Joseph W. Newman, Kenneth D. Mccracken, Ken Martin, Richard Pratte, Linda Irwin-Devitis, Frank B. Murray, Neil Sutherland, John A. Beineke & Paul John Plath - 1990 - Educational Studies 21 (3):289-327.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  13
    Entities and Individuation: Studies in Ontology and Language : in Honour of Neil Wilson.Neil L. Wilson & D. Stewart - 1989 - Edwin Mellen Press.
    Essays devoted to the work of the late Neil Wilson, Canadian philosopher and contributor to the field of semantic analysis that emerged from the fusion of logic, pragmatism, and ontology. Many of the essays in this volume take their initial inspiration from Wilson's seminal work Substances Without Substrata.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The "No Interest" Argument Against the Rights of Nature.Neil W. Williams - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    Awarding rights to rivers, forests, and other environmental entities (EEs) is a new and increasingly popular approach to environmental protection. The distinctive feature of such rights of nature (RoN) legislation is that direct duties are owed to the EEs. This paper presents a novel rebuttal of the strongest argument against RoN: the no interest argument. The crux of this argument is that because EEs are not sentient, they cannot possess the kinds of interests necessary to ground direct duties. Therefore, they (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Horrendous Evils and The Goodness of God.Marilyn McCord Adams & Stewart Sutherland - 1989 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63 (1):297-323.
  6.  20
    Identification of emotional facial expressions among behaviorally inhibited adolescents with lifetime anxiety disorders.Bethany C. Reeb-Sutherland, Lela Rankin Williams, Kathryn A. Degnan, Koraly Pérez-Edgar, Andrea Chronis-Tuscano, Ellen Leibenluft, Daniel S. Pine, Seth D. Pollak & Nathan A. Fox - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (2):372-382.
  7.  12
    Ancestral Eukaryotes Reproduced Asexually, Facilitated by Polyploidy: A Hypothesis.Sutherland K. Maciver - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (12):1900152.
    The notion that eukaryotes are ancestrally sexual has been gaining attention. This idea comes in part from the discovery of sets of “meiosis‐specific genes” in the genomes of protists. The existence of these genes has persuaded many that these organisms may be engaging in sex, even though this has gone undetected. The involvement of sex in protists is supported by the view that asexual reproduction results in the accumulation of mutations that would inevitably result in the decline and extinction of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  16
    Teaching/Preaching the Theology of Lamentations.Kandy Queen-Sutherland - 2013 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 67 (2):184-193.
    The cries of Lamentations are desperate, wailing up from the darkest side of human existence. They will not be silenced. Lament harasses those who oppress and calls all to justice—even God.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Radical Empiricism, British Idealism, and the Reality of Relations.Neil W. Williams - 2021 - In Sarin Marchetti (ed.), The Jamesian Mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 398-411.
  10. The Affective Preconditions of Inquiry: Hookway on Doubt, Sentiment, and Ethics.Neil W. Williams - 2023 - In Robert B. Talisse, Paniel Reyes Cárdenas & Daniel Herbert (eds.), Pragmatic Reason: Christopher Hookway and the American Philosophical Tradition. London: Routledge. pp. 162-181.
    One of the major contributions which Christopher Hookway has made to pragmatist epistemology is a critical exploration of the role that affective dispositions play in inquiry. According to Hookway, a well-functioning rational inquirer must rely upon a set of pre-reflective and affective dispositions which are not themselves fully available to rational evaluation. Despite their pre-reflective nature, on the pragmatist account these affective dispositions provide us with judgments and evaluations which are in many cases more reliable than those provided by explicit (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  8
    God and Timelessness.Stewart R. Sutherland - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (83):187-188.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  27
    Clinical Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Using a Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Network Classifier.Κ Sutherland, R. De Silva & R. G. Will - 1997 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 7 (1-2):1-18.
  13.  54
    Mathematics and Necessity: Essays in the History of Philosophy (review).Daniel Sutherland - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):426-427.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.3 (2003) 426-427 [Access article in PDF] Timothy Smiley, editor. Mathematics and Necessity: Essays in the History of Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. ix + 166. Cloth, $35.00.Mathematics and Necessity contains essays by M. F. Burnyeat, Ian Hacking, and Jonathan Bennett based on lectures given to the British Academy in 1998. All concern the history of the philosophical treatment of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  61
    Against Intellectual Autonomy: Social Animals Need Social Virtues.Neil Levy - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (3):350-363.
    We are constantly called upon to evaluate the evidential weight of testimony, and to balance its deliverances against our own independent thinking. ‘Intellectual autonomy’ is the virtue that is supposed to be displayed by those who engage in cognition in this domain well. I argue that this is at best a misleading label for the virtue, because virtuous cognition in this domain consists in thinking with others, and intelligently responding to testimony. I argue that the existing label supports an excessively (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  44
    The Powers Metaphysic.Neil E. Williams - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Neil E. Williams develops a systematic metaphysics centred on the idea of powers, as a rival to neo-Humeanism, the dominant systematic metaphysics in philosophy today. Williams takes powers to be inherently causal properties and uses them as the foundation of his explanations of causation, persistence, laws, and modality.
    No categories
  16.  42
    Richard Rorty: the making of an American philosopher.Neil Gross - 2008 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    On his death in 2007, Richard Rorty was heralded by the New York Times as “one of the world’s most influential contemporary thinkers.” Controversial on the left and the right for his critiques of objectivity and political radicalism, Rorty experienced a renown denied to all but a handful of living philosophers. In this masterly biography, Neil Gross explores the path of Rorty’s thought over the decades in order to trace the intellectual and professional journey that led him to that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  17.  34
    Mental Acts.Neil Cooper - 1959 - Philosophical Quarterly 9 (36):278-279.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  18.  17
    Myosin II function in non‐muscle cells.Sutherland K. Maciver - 1996 - Bioessays 18 (3):179-182.
    Amongst the remarkable variety of motility that cells display, cytokinesis (cell division) is particularly striking. Dramatic changes in cell shape occur before, during and after cytokinesis. Myosin II is implicated in the ‘rounding up’ of cells prior to cytokinesis, and is essential in the formation of the contractile cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Now it appears that myosin II plays a role in all stages of cytokinesis, as a recent report(1) suggests that myosin II drives post‐mitotic cell spreading. A similar type (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  83
    H.L.A. Hart.Neil MacCormick - 1981 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    Introduction HLA Hart: A biographical sketch Jurisprudence is the theoretical study of a practical subject. Its object is to achieve a systematic and ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  20. The Volitional Brain: Towards a Neuroscience of Free Will.Benjamin Libet, Anthony Freeman & Keith Sutherland - 1999 - Imprint Academic.
    It is widely accepted in science that the universe is a closed deterministic system in which everything can, ultimately, be explained by purely physical...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  21. Applying Ethical Theories: Interpreting and Responding to Student Plagiarism.Neil Granitz & Dana Loewy - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):293-306.
    Given the tremendous proliferation of student plagiarism involving the Internet, the purpose of this study is to determine which theory of ethical reasoning students invoke when defending their transgressions: deontology, utilitarianism, rational self-interest, Machiavellianism, cultural relativism, or situational ethics. Understanding which theory of ethical reasoning students employ is critical, as preemptive steps can be taken by faculty to counteract this reasoning and prevent plagiarism. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that unethical behavior in school can lead to unethical behavior in business; (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  22. Sophistication about Symmetries.Neil Dewar - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (2):485-521.
    Suppose that one thinks that certain symmetries of a theory reveal “surplus structure”. What would a formalism without that surplus structure look like? The conventional answer is that it would be a reduced theory: a theory which traffics only in structures invariant under the relevant symmetry. In this paper, I argue that there is a neglected alternative: one can work with a sophisticated version of the theory, in which the symmetries act as isomorphisms.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  23.  16
    Harmful Choices, the Case of C, and Decision-Making Competence.Neil Pickering, GIles Newton-Howes & Greg Young - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (10):38-50.
    In this paper, we make the case that a person who is considering or has already made a decision that appears seriously harmful to that person should in some cases be judged incapable of making that...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  24.  30
    ‘Take my kidneys but not my corneas’—Selective preferences as a hidden problem for ‘opt‐out’ organ donation policy.Nicola Jane Williams & Neil C. Manson - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (8):829-839.
    With aims to both increase organ supply and better reflect individual donation preferences, many nations worldwide have shifted from ‘opt‐in’ to ‘opt‐out’ systems for post‐mortem organ donation (PMOD). In such countries, while a prospective donor's willingness to donate their organs/tissues for PMOD was previously ascertained—at least partially—by their having recorded positive donation preferences on an official register prior to death, this willingness is now presumed or inferred—at least partially—from their not having recorded an objection to PMOD—on an official organ donation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  14
    Risk-related standards of competence are a nonsense.Neil John Pickering, Giles Newton-Howes & Simon Walker - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (11):893-898.
    If a person is competent to consent to a treatment, is that person necessarily competent to refuse the very same treatment? Risk relativists answer no to this question. If the refusal of a treatment is risky, we may demand a higher level of decision-making capacity to choose this option. The position is known as asymmetry. Risk relativity rests on the possibility of setting variable levels of competence by reference to variable levels of risk. In an excellent 2016 article inJournal of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26.  16
    Hume’s Moral Epistemology.Stewart R. Sutherland - 1978 - Philosophical Quarterly 28 (110):77-78.
  27.  72
    Structure and Equivalence.Neil Dewar - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    This Element explores what it means for two theories in physics to be equivalent, and what lessons can be drawn about their structure as a result. It does so through a twofold approach. On the one hand, it provides a synoptic overview of the logical tools that have been employed in recent philosophy of physics to explore these topics: definition, translation, Ramsey sentences, and category theory. On the other, it provides a detailed case study of how these ideas may be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28.  45
    Two modes of learning for interactive tasks.Neil A. Hayes & Donald E. Broadbent - 1988 - Cognition 28 (3):249-276.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   125 citations  
  29.  20
    Social License and Environmental Protection: Why Businesses Go Beyond Compliance.Neil Gunningham, Robert A. Kagan & Dorothy Thornton - 2004 - Law and Social Inquiry 29 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  30. Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal.Neil Delaney - 1996 - American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339-356.
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  31.  34
    Dispositional Pluralism By Jennifer McKitrick. [REVIEW]NeilE Williams - 2019 - Analysis 79 (4):803-805.
    Dispositional Pluralism By McKitrickJenniferOxford University Press, 2018. iv + 262 pp.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  17
    Kant.Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    "First Published in 1999, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  33.  27
    Australian public understandings of artificial intelligence.Neil Selwyn & Beatriz Gallo Cordoba - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (4):1645-1662.
    In light of the growing need to pay attention to general public opinions and sentiments toward AI, this paper examines the levels of understandings amongst the Australian public toward the increased societal use of AI technologies. Drawing on a nationally representative survey of 2019 adults across Australia, the paper examines how aware people consider themselves to be of recent developments in AI; variations in popular conceptions of what AI is; and the extent to which levels of support for AI are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34.  11
    Cognitive Science: An Introduction.Neil A. Stillings - 1995 - MIT Press.
    Cognitive Science is a single-source undergraduate text that broadly surveys the theories and empirical results of cognitive science within a consistent computational perspective. In addition to covering the individual contributions of psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and artificial intelligence to cognitive science, the book has been revised to introduce the connectionist approach as well as the classical symbolic approach and adds a new chapter on cognitively related advances in neuroscience. Cognitive science is a rapidly evolving field that is characterized by considerable contention (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  35. Reframing the debate between agency and stakeholder theories of the firm.Neil A. Shankman - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):319 - 334.
    The conflict between agency and stakeholder theories of the firm has long been entrenched in organizational and management literature. At the core of this debate are two competing views of the firm in which assumptions and process contrast each other so sharply that agency and stakeholder views of the firm are often described as polar opposites. The purpose of this paper is to show how agency theory can be subsumed within a general stakeholder model of the firm. By analytically deconstructing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  36.  63
    Individual, social and organizational sources of sharing and variation in the ethical reasoning of managers.Neil A. Granitz - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (2):101 - 124.
    A growth in consumer and media ethical consciousness has resulted in the need for organizations to ensure that members understand, share and project an approved and unified set of ethics. Thus understanding which variables are related to sharing and variation of ethical reasoning and moral intent, and the relative strength of these variables is critical. While past research has examined individual (attitudes, values, etc.), social (peers, significant others, etc.) and organizational (codes of conduct, senior management, etc.) variables, it has focused (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  37.  18
    The Volitional Brain: Towards a Neuroscience of Free Will.Benjamin Libet, Anthony Freeman & Keith Sutherland (eds.) - 2000 - Imprint Academic.
    It is widely accepted in science that the universe is a closed deterministic system in which everything can, ultimately, be explained by purely physical causation. And yet we all experience ourselves as having the freedom to choose between alternatives presented to us — ‘we’ are in the driving seat. The puzzling status of volition is explored in this issue by a distinguished body of scientists and philosophers.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  38.  44
    The Retreat to Commitment.Neil Cooper - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (58):72-72.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   107 citations  
  39.  74
    Why are professors liberal?Neil Gross & Ethan Fosse - 2012 - Theory and Society 41 (2):127-168.
    The political liberalism of professors—an important occupational group and anomaly according to traditional theories of class politics—has long puzzled sociologists. This article sheds new light on the subject by employing a two-step analytic procedure. In the first step, we assess the explanatory power of the main hypotheses proposed over the last half century to account for professors’ liberal views. To do so, we examine hypothesized predictors of the political gap between professors and other Americans using General Social Survey data pooled (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  40.  45
    Pragmatism and the study of large-scale social phenomena.Neil Gross - 2018 - Theory and Society 47 (1):87-111.
    Pragmatism has recently gained ground as a theoretical perspective in sociology. The approach is not without its critics, however. One common charge is that pragmatism is oriented toward the micro and not well suited for the explanation of meso- or macro-level events, processes, or outcomes. In this paper—a review essay—I consider whether the charge has merit. I examine four studies that draw heavily on pragmatism and give some indication of its explanatory potential. Taken together, these studies suggest that pragmatism has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  13
    Crimes of Dispassion: Autonomous Weapons and the Moral Challenge of Systematic Killing.Neil Renic & Elke Schwarz - 2023 - Ethics and International Affairs 37 (3):321-343.
    Systematic killing has long been associated with some of the darkest episodes in human history. Increasingly, however, it is framed as a desirable outcome in war, particularly in the context of military AI and lethal autonomy. Autonomous weapons systems, defenders argue, will surpass humans not only militarily but also morally, enabling a more precise and dispassionate mode of violence, free of the emotion and uncertainty that too often weaken compliance with the rules and standards of war. We contest this framing. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Arthritis and Nature's Joints.Neil E. Williams - 2011 - In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Matthew H. Slater (eds.), Carving nature at its joints: natural kinds in metaphysics and science. Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
    This chapter focuses on the view that diseases comprise natural kinds and how this view is in conflict with the essentialist picture of natural kinds as championed by Kripke and Putnam. This essentialist depiction of natural kinds contends that in order for a class of entities to be a natural kind, it is required that all and only members of the class instantiate very specific properties that explain the presence of any other properties typically associated with being a member of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  43. Plural Harm.Neil Feit - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):361-388.
    In this paper, I construct and defend an account of harm, specifically, all-things-considered overall harm. I start with a simple comparative account, on which an event harms a person provided that she would have been better off had it not occurred. The most significant problems for this account are overdetermination and preemption cases. However, a counterfactual comparative approach of some sort is needed to make sense of harm, or so I argue. I offer a counterfactual comparative theory that accounts nicely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  44. Maxwell Gravitation.Neil Dewar - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (2):249-270.
    This article gives an explicit presentation of Newtonian gravitation on the backdrop of Maxwell space-time, giving a sense in which acceleration is relative in gravitational theory. However, caution is needed: assessing whether this is a robust or interesting sense of the relativity of acceleration depends on some subtle technical issues and on substantive philosophical questions over how to identify the space-time structure of a theory.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  45.  90
    On Gravitational Energy in Newtonian Theories.Neil Dewar & James Owen Weatherall - 2018 - Foundations of Physics 48 (5):558-578.
    There are well-known problems associated with the idea of gravitational energy in general relativity. We offer a new perspective on those problems by comparison with Newtonian gravitation, and particularly geometrized Newtonian gravitation. We show that there is a natural candidate for the energy density of a Newtonian gravitational field. But we observe that this quantity is gauge dependent, and that it cannot be defined in the geometrized theory without introducing further structure. We then address a potential response by showing that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  46.  31
    Simply complexity: a clear guide to complexity theory.Neil F. Johnson - 2007 - Oxford: Oneworld. Edited by Neil F. Johnson.
    What exactly is complexity science? Two's company, three is complexity ; Disorder rules, OK? ; Chaos and all that jazz ; Mob mentality ; Getting connected -- What can complexity science do for me? Forecasting financial markets ; Tackling traffic networks and climbing the corporate ladder ; Looking for Mr./Mrs. Right ; Coping with conflict : next-generation wars and global terrorism -- Catching a cold, avoiding super-flu and curing cancer ; The mother of all complexities : our nanoscale quantum world (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47.  27
    Can monolinguals be like bilinguals? Evidence from dialect switching.Neil W. Kirk, Vera Kempe, Kenneth C. Scott-Brown, Andrea Philipp & Mathieu Declerck - 2018 - Cognition 170 (C):164-178.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48.  17
    “That proves you mad, because you know it not”: impaired insight and the dilemma of governing psychiatric patients as legal subjects.Neil Gong - 2017 - Theory and Society 46 (3):201-228.
    This article investigates “impaired insight,” a controversial psychiatric category describing a mad person unable to know his or her madness. Like “moral insanity” and other concepts before it, impaired insight offers a way to link the disparate logics of human responsibility in psychiatry and the law. I attribute its development to changes wrought by deinstitutionalization, the rise of antipsychotic medication, and patient incarceration in penal settings. In a system that aims to govern psychiatric patients through their freedom, the logic of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  38
    Constructing the Subject: Historical Origins of Psychological Research.Neil Bolton & Kurt Danziger - 1991 - British Journal of Educational Studies 39 (3):345.
  50.  15
    Editors’ introduction.B. Libet, A. Freeman & J. Sutherland - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):x-xxiii.
    [opening paragraph]: Our sense of free will depends upon a balance between reliability and flexibility in relation to cause-and-effect. Without the former, all outcomes would be arbitrary; without the latter, all outcomes would be predetermined. In neither case would there be any way of putting one's will into effect. So much is clear, yet establishing that precarious balance has proved so difficult that Kant himself declared ‘freedom of the will’ to be one of only three metaphysical problems which lie beyond (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
1 — 50 / 993