38 found
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  1. The Magical Number 4 in Short-Term Memory: A Reconsideration of Mental Storage Capacity.Nelson Cowan - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):87-114.
    Miller (1956) summarized evidence that people can remember about seven chunks in short-term memory (STM) tasks. However, that number was meant more as a rough estimate and a rhetorical device than as a real capacity limit. Others have since suggested that there is a more precise capacity limit, but that it is only three to five chunks. The present target article brings together a wide variety of data on capacity limits suggesting that the smaller capacity limit is real. Capacity limits (...)
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  2. Attention and Memory: An Integrated Framework.Nelson Cowan - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
  3.  11
    A Central Capacity Limit to the Simultaneous Storage of Visual and Auditory Arrays in Working Memory.J. Scott Saults & Nelson Cowan - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (4):663-684.
  4.  40
    Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan & Glenda Andrews - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236-242.
  5.  6
    Central and Peripheral Components of Working Memory Storage.Nelson Cowan, J. Scott Saults & Christopher L. Blume - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (5):1806-1836.
  6. Metatheory of Storage Capacity Limits.Nelson Cowan - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):154-176.
    Commentators expressed a wide variety of views on whether there is a basic capacity limit of 3 to 5 chunks and, among those who believe in it, about why it occurs. In this response, I conclude that the capacity limit is real and that the concept is strengthened by additional evidence offered by a number of commentators. I consider various arguments why the limit occurs and try to organize these arguments into a conceptual framework or “metatheory” of storage capacity limits (...)
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  7. What Do Estimates of Working Memory Capacity Tell Us.Nelson Cowan, Candice C. Morey, Zhijian Chen & Michael Bunting - 2007 - In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. Oxford University Press.
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  8.  5
    Chunk Formation in Immediate Memory and How It Relates to Data Compression.Mustapha Chekaf, Nelson Cowan & Fabien Mathy - 2016 - Cognition 155:96-107.
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  9. Focused and Divided Attention to the Eyes and Ears : A Research Journey.Nelson Cowan - 2012 - In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. pp. 32.
  10.  26
    Estimating Unconscious Processes: Implications of a General Class of Models.Nelson Cowan & Michael A. Stadler - 1996 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (2):195-200.
  11.  7
    George Miller’s Magical Number of Immediate Memory in Retrospect: Observations on the Faltering Progression of Science.Nelson Cowan - 2015 - Psychological Review 122 (3):536-541.
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  12.  12
    Children's Working-Memory Processes: A Response-Timing Analysis.Nelson Cowan, John N. Towse, Zoë Hamilton, J. Scott Saults, Emily M. Elliott, Jebby F. Lacey, Matthew V. Moreno & Graham J. Hitch - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (1):113.
  13.  87
    Visual and Auditory Working Memory Capacity.Nelson Cowan - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):77.
  14.  10
    Two Separate Verbal Processing Rates Contributing to Short-Term Memory Span.Nelson Cowan, Noelle L. Wood, Phillip K. Wood, Timothy A. Keller, Lara D. Nugent & Connie V. Keller - 1998 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 127 (2):141-160.
  15.  16
    The Cocktail Party Phenomenon Revisited: Attention and Memory in the Classic Selective Listening Procedure of Cherry (1953).Noelle L. Wood & Nelson Cowan - 1995 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (3):243.
  16.  8
    Editorial: Representational States in Memory: Where Do We Stand?Ilke Öztekin & Nelson Cowan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  17.  9
    A Generalized Signal Detection Model to Predict Rational Variation in Base Rate Use.Peter R. Mueser, Nelson Cowan & Kim T. Mueser - 1999 - Cognition 69 (3):267-312.
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  18.  48
    Visual Working Memory Depends on Attentional Filtering.Nelson Cowan & Candice C. Morey - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):139-141.
  19. Forgetting Due to Retroactive Interference in Amnesia: Findings and Implications.Michaela Dewar, Nelson Cowan & Sergio Della Sala - 2010 - In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Forgetting. Psychology Press.
  20.  37
    What is More Explanatory, Processing Capacity or Processing Speed?Nelson Cowan - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):835-836.
    Halford et al. have sharpened the concept of processing capacity as applied to various complex tasks. This commentary examines the apparent contradiction between capacity theories and theories in which it is processing speed, rather than capacity, that presumably limits cognitive performance. It explains how capacity and speed often are interrelated and suggests how one might examine whether capacity or speed is the more elementary in processing.
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  21. The Legend of the Magical Number Seven.Nelson Cowan, Candice C. Morey & Chen & Zhijian - 2007 - In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. Oxford University Press.
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  22.  31
    Constraints on Awareness, Attention, Processing, and Memory: Some Recent Investigations with Ignored Speech.Nelson Cowan & Noelle L. Wood - 1997 - Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):182-203.
    We discuss potential benefits of research in which attention is directed toward or away from a spoken channel and measures of the allocation of attention are used. This type of research is relevant to at least two basic, still-unresolved issues in cognitive psychology: the extent to which unattended information is processed and the extent to which unattended information that is processed can later be remembered. Four recent studies of this type that address these questions in various ways are reviewed as (...)
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  23.  15
    Can We Resolve Contradictions Between Process Dissociation Models?Nelson Cowan - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):255-259.
    Wainwright and Reingold presented equations for various versions of the process dissociation procedure that has been used to separate conscious and unconscious memory processes. In the present reply it is suggested that these equations, though helpful, may not capture some of the key theoretical possibilities that could help to resolve apparent contradictions and paradoxes in the empirical literature. Specifically, there could be an independence ofprocessesthat might be estimated to a sufficient degree of accuracy for some theoretical purposes despite a violation (...)
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  24.  3
    Storage and Processing in Working Memory: Assessing Dual-Task Performance and Task Prioritization Across the Adult Lifespan.Stephen Rhodes, Agnieszka J. Jaroslawska, Jason M. Doherty, Clément Belletier, Moshe Naveh-Benjamin, Nelson Cowan, Valérie Camos, Pierre Barrouillet & Robert H. Logie - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (7):1204-1227.
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  25.  41
    Within Fluid Cognition: Fluid Processing and Fluid Storage?Nelson Cowan - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):129-130.
    Blair describes fluid cognition as highly related to working memory and executive processes, and dependent on the integrity of frontal-lobe functioning. However, the literature review appears to neglect potential contributions to fluid cognition of the focus of attention as an important information-storage device, and the role of posterior brain regions in that kind of storage. Relevant cognitive and imaging studies are discussed. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  26.  20
    Neuropsychology and Mental Structure: Where Do We Go From Here?Nelson Cowan - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):445-446.
  27.  42
    Working Memory and Flexibility in Awareness and Attention.Michael F. Bunting & Nelson Cowan - 2005 - Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung 69 (5):412-419.
  28.  7
    Merging with the Path Not Taken: Wilhelm Wundt’s Work as a Precursor to the Embedded-Processes Approach to Memory, Attention, and Consciousness.Nelson Cowan & Nikolay R. Rachev - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 63:228-238.
  29.  7
    Experimental Psychology Generally, and the Journal Today.Nelson Cowan - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (4):459-461.
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  30.  11
    "Models of Verbal Working Memory Capacity: What Does It Take to Make Them Work?": Correction to Cowan Et Al.Nelson Cowan, Jeffrey N. Rouder, Christopher L. Blume & J. Scott Saults - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (3):499-499.
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  31.  27
    Varieties of Procedural Accounts of Working Memory Retention Systems.Nelson Cowan - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):731-732.
    The present commentary agrees with many of the points made by Ruchkin et al., but brings up several important differences in assumptions. These assumptions have to do with the nature of the capacity limit in working memory and the possible bases of working-memory activation.
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  32.  13
    Converging Evidence About Information Processing.Nelson Cowan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):237-238.
  33.  12
    When Does a Good Working Memory Counteract Proactive Interference? Surprising Evidence From a Probe Recognition Task.Nelson Cowan & J. Scott Saults - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):12.
  34.  9
    Applying How Adults Rehearse to Understand How Rehearsal May Develop.Nelson Cowan & Evie Vergauwe - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  35.  6
    Models of Verbal Working Memory Capacity: What Does It Take to Make Them Work?Nelson Cowan, Jeffrey N. Rouder, Christopher L. Blume & J. Scott Saults - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (3):480-499.
  36.  6
    Speech Perception by Ear, Eye, Hand, and Mind.Nelson Cowan - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):759-760.
  37.  4
    On the Use of Response Chunking as a Tool to Investigate Strategies.Christopher L. Blume, Alexander P. Boone & Nelson Cowan - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  38. What Do Estimates of Working Memory Capacity Tell Us?Nelson Cowan, Candice C. Morey, Zhijian Chen & Bunting & Michael - 2007 - In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. Oxford University Press.
     
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