Results for 'Neuropsychological Rehabilitation'

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  1. Implicit Memory and Errorless Learning: A Link Between Cognitive Theory and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation.A. D. Baddeley - 1992 - In L. R. Squire & N. Butters (eds.), Neuropsychology of Memory. Guilford Press. pp. 2--309.
     
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  2.  48
    Assessing Level of Consciousness and Cognitive Changes From Vegetative State to Full Recovery.Tristan Bekinschtein, Cecilia Tiberti, Jorge Niklison, Mercedes Tamashiro, Melania Ron, Silvina Carpintiero, Mirta Villarreal, Cecilia Forcato, Ramon Leiguarda & Facundo Manes - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):307-322.
  3.  27
    The Three Vectors of Consciousness and Their Disturbances After Brain Injury.George P. Prigatano & Sterling C. Johnson - 2003 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 13 (1):13-29.
  4.  25
    Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting.Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard - 2003 - Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.
  5. Differences in Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits Among Three Patient Populations.D. Ashley Cohen - manuscript
  6. Editorial: Pathologies of Awareness: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice.Linda Clare & Peter W. Halligan - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):353-355.
     
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  7.  78
    A Review of Awareness Interventions in Brain Injury Rehabilitation[REVIEW]J. M. Fleming & T. Ownsworth - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):474-500.
  8.  40
    Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation.Peter W. Halligan - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
  9.  33
    Rehabilitative Management of Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Grand Rounds.Joseph T. Giacino & Charlotte T. Trott - 2004 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 19 (3):254-265.
  10.  1
    The Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Cognitive Rehabilitation in Brain-Damaged Patients.Bolewska Anna & Łojek Emilia - 2013 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 44 (1):31-39.
    This study examined the effects of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation in a group of 16 brain-damaged patients. Therapeutic effectiveness was assessed by improvement on computer tasks, the results of neuropsychological tests and quality of life ratings. Participants suffered from mild to moderate attention and memory problems or aphasia. The procedure involved baseline assessment, a 15-week course of therapy conducted twice a week and posttest. Neuropsychological tests assessing attention, memory and language problems and quality of life ratings were administered (...)
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  11. The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness?Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster - 2002 - Psyche 8 (2).
    A key element of the distinction between explicit and implicit cognitive functioning is the presence or absence of conscious awareness. In this review, we consider the proposal that neuropsychological disorders can best be considered in terms of a decoupling between preserved implicit or unconscious processing and impaired explicit or conscious processing. Evidence for dissociations between implicit and explicit processes in blindsight, amnesia, object agnosia, prosopagnosia, hemi-neglect, and aphasia is examined. The implications of these findings for a) our understanding of (...)
     
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  12.  56
    Approaches to the Assessment of Awareness: Conceptual Issues.Ivana S. Marková & German E. Berrios - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):439-455.
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  13.  29
    Neurophysiological Correlates of Persistent Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Erik J. Kobylarz & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):323-332.
  14.  45
    Incidence and Prevalence of the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.J. Graham Beaumont & Pamela M. Kenealy - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 15 (3):184-189.
  15.  49
    Self-Awareness After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury.Laura J. Bach & Anthony S. David - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):397-414.
  16.  35
    Visual Restoration in Cortical Blindness: Insights From Natural and TMS-Induced Blindsight.Tony Ro & Robert Rafal - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):377-396.
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  17.  23
    What Do We Mean by "Conscious" and "Aware?".Adam Z. J. Zeman - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):356-376.
  18. Diagnostic and Prognostic Guidelines for the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Joseph T. Giacino & Kathleen Kalmar - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):166-174.
  19. Neurophysiological Patterns of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Jean-Michel Guérit - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):357-371.
  20.  55
    Voluntary Rehabilitation? On Neurotechnological Behavioural Treatment, Valid Consent and (In)Appropriate Offers.Lene Bomann-Larsen - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):65-77.
    Criminal offenders may be offered to participate in voluntary rehabilitation programs aiming at correcting undesirable behaviour, as a condition of early release. Behavioural treatment may include direct intervention into the central nervous system (CNS). This article discusses under which circumstances voluntary rehabilitation by CNS intervention is justified. It is argued that although the context of voluntary rehabilitation is a coercive circumstance, consent may still be effective, in the sense that it can meet formal criteria for informed consent. (...)
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  21.  28
    Conflicts of Interest in Recommendations to Use Computerized Neuropsychological Tests to Manage Concussion in Professional Football Codes.Bradley Partridge & Wayne Hall - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (1):63-74.
    Neuroscience research has improved our understanding of the long term consequences of sports-related concussion, but ethical issues related to the prevention and management of concussion are an underdeveloped area of inquiry. This article exposes several examples of conflicts of interest that have arisen and been tolerated in the management of concussion in sport (particularly professional football codes) regarding the use of computerized neuropsychological (NP) tests for diagnosing concussion. Part 1 outlines how the recommendations of a series of global protocols (...)
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  22.  63
    Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention: Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity.Thomas Douglas - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 18 (2):101-122.
    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond persuasively to this (...)
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  23.  18
    Neuro-Interventions as Criminal Rehabilitation: An Ethical Review.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2017 - In Jonathan D. Jacobs & Jonathan Jackson (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Criminal Justice Ethics. London: Routledge.
    According to a number of influential views in penal theory, 1 one of the primary goals of the criminal justice system is to rehabilitate offenders. Rehabilitativemeasures are commonly included as a part of a criminal sentence. For example, in some jurisdictions judges may order violent offenders to attend anger management classes or to undergo cognitive behavioural therapy as a part of their sentences. In a limited number of cases, neurointerventions — interventions that exert a direct biological effect on the brain (...)
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  24.  17
    Psychopathy, Executive Functions, and Neuropsychological Data: A Response to Sifferd and Hirstein.Marko Jurjako & Luca Malatesti - 2016 - Neuroethics:1-11.
  25.  4
    Goals in Their Setting: A Normative Analysis of Goal Setting in Physical Rehabilitation.Rita Struhkamp - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (2):131-155.
    Goal setting is an important professional method and one of the key concepts that structure a practical field such as physical rehabilitation. However, the actual use of goals in rehabilitation practice is much less straightforward than the general acceptance of the method suggests as goals are frequently unattained, modified or contested. In this paper, I will argue that the difficulties of goal setting in day-to-day medical practice can be understood by unravelling the normative assumptions of goal setting, in (...)
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  26.  22
    Can Medical Interventions Serve as ‘Criminal Rehabilitation’?Gulzaar Barn - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-12.
    ‘Moral bioenhancement’ refers to the use of pharmaceuticals and other direct brain interventions to enhance ‘moral’ traits such as ‘empathy,’ and alter any ‘morally problematic’ dispositions, such as ‘aggression.’ This is believed to result in improved moral responses. In a recent paper, Tom Douglas considers whether medical interventions of this sort could be “provided as part of the criminal justice system’s response to the commission of crime, and for the purposes of facilitating rehabilitation : 101–122, 2014).” He suggests that (...)
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  27.  8
    The 'Empowered Client'in Vocational Rehabilitation: The Excluding Impact of Inclusive Strategies.Lineke Be van Hal, Agnes Meershoek, Frans Nijhuis & Klasien Horstman - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):213-230.
    In vocational rehabilitation, empowerment is understood as the notion that people should make an active, autonomous choice to find their way back to the labour process. Following this line of reasoning, the concept of empowerment implicitly points to a specific kind of activation strategy, namely labour participation. This activation approach has received criticism for being paternalistic, disciplining and having a one-sided orientation on labour participation. Although we share this theoretical criticism, we want to go beyond it by paying attention (...)
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  28.  5
    Executive Function and Language Deficits Associated with Aggressive-Sadistic Personality.Anthony C. Ruocco & Steven M. Platek - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):239-240.
    Aggressive-sadistic personality disorder (SPD) involves derivation of pleasure from another's physical or emotional suffering, or from control and domination of others. Findings from a head-injured sample indicate that SPD traits are associated with neuropsychological deficits in executive function and language, suggesting difficulties in frontal-lobe-mediated self-regulation of aggressive and emotional impulses. Implications for rehabilitation of aggressive offenders are discussed.
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  29.  5
    Rehabilitation of Impaired Awareness.Mark Sherer - 2005 - In Walter M. Jr. High, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press. pp. 31-46.
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  30.  5
    Experiences of Being Tested: A Critical Discussion of the Knowledge Involved and Produced in the Practice of Testing in Children's Rehabilitation.Wenche S. Bjorbækmo & Gunn H. Engelsrud - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):123-131.
    Intensive professional testing of children with disabilities is becoming increasingly prominent within the field of children’s rehabilitation. In this paper we question the high quality ascribed to standardized assessment procedures. We explore testing practices using a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach analyzing data from interviews and participant observations among 20 children with disabilities and their parents. All the participating children have extensive experience from being tested. This study reveals that the practices of testing have certain limitations when confronted with the lived experience (...)
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  31.  9
    The Unique Ethical Challenges of Conducting Research in the Rehabilitation Medicine Population.Jeff Blackmer - 2003 - BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-6.
    Background The broad topic of research ethics is one which has been relatively well-investigated and discussed. Unique ethical issues have been identified for such populations as pediatrics, where the issues of consent and assent have received much attention, and obstetrics, with concerns such as the potential for research to cause harm to the fetus. However, little has been written about ethical concerns which are relatively unique to the population of patients seen by the practitioner of rehabilitation medicine. Discussion This (...)
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  32.  5
    The 'Empowered Client' in Vocational Rehabilitation: The Excluding Impact of Inclusive Strategies. [REVIEW]Lineke B. E. Hal, Agnes Meershoek, Frans Nijhuis & Klasien Horstman - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):213-230.
    In vocational rehabilitation, empowerment is understood as the notion that people should make an active, autonomous choice to find their way back to the labour process. Following this line of reasoning, the concept of empowerment implicitly points to a specific kind of activation strategy, namely labour participation. This activation approach has received criticism for being paternalistic, disciplining and having a one-sided orientation on labour participation. Although we share this theoretical criticism, we want to go beyond it by paying attention (...)
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  33. The Neuropsychology of Emotion.Joan C. Borod (ed.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This volume represents a comprehensive overview of the neuropsychology of emotion and the neural mechanisms underlying emotional processing. It draws on recent studies utilizing behavioral paradigms with normal subjects, the brain lesion approach, clinical evaluations of patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders, and neuroimaging techniques. The book opens with an introduction summarizing each chapter and pointing to directions for future research. The first section is on history, the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of emotion, and techniques that have been widely used to (...)
     
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  34. Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues.George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) - 1991 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This volume provides, for the first time, multidisciplinary perspectives on the problem of awareness of deficits following brain injury. Such deficits may involve perception, attention, memory, language, or motor functions, and they can seriously disrupt an individual's ability to function. However, some brain-damaged patients are entirely unaware of the existence or severity of their deficits, even when they are easily noticed by others. In addressing these topics, contributors cover the entire range of neuropsychological syndromes in which problems with awareness (...)
     
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  35. The Study of Anosognosia.George P. Prigatano - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The study of anosognosia has witnessed an unprecedented increase in interest over the last 20 years. This has resulted in numerous empirical investigations as well as theoretical writings on the nature of human consciousness and how disorders of the brain may influence the person's subjective awareness of a disturbed neurological or neuropsychological function. This edited text summarizes many of the advances that have taken place in the field of anosognosia. It reviews research findings on anosognosia for hemiplegia following stroke, (...)
     
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  36.  11
    Quality of Stroke Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines.Amanda Hurdowar, Ian D. Graham, Mark Bayley, Margaret Harrison, Sharon Wood‐Dauphinee & Sanjit Bhogal - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):657-664.
  37.  22
    Analysis of Scientific Truth Status in Controlled Rehabilitation Trials.Roger Kerry, Aurélien Madouasse, Antony Arthur & Stephen D. Mumford - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):617-625.
  38.  17
    A Moral and Ethical Assemblage in Russian Orthodox Drug Rehabilitation.Jarrett Zigon - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (1):30-50.
  39.  8
    The Right to Bodily Integrity and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Through Medical Interventions: A Reply to Thomas Douglas.Elizabeth Shaw - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-10.
    Medical interventions such as methadone treatment for drug addicts or “chemical castration” for sex offenders have been used in several jurisdictions alongside or as an alternative to traditional punishments, such as incarceration. As our understanding of the biological basis for human behaviour develops, our criminal justice system may make increasing use of such medical techniques and may become less reliant on incarceration. Academic debate on this topic has largely focused on whether offenders can validly consent to medical interventions, given the (...)
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  40.  3
    The Effects of a Back Rehabilitation Programme for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.Lynne Gaskell, Stephanie Enright & Sarah Tyson - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):795-800.
  41.  4
    New Roles in Rehabilitation – the Implications for Nurses and Other Professionals.Emma Stanmore, Susan Ormrod & Heather Waterman - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):656-664.
  42.  17
    A Feminist Perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation: The Relevance of de Beauvoir's Theory.Kari Kvigne & Marit Kirkevold - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):79-89.
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  43.  6
    Heart Rate Response and Factors Affecting Exercise Performance During Home‐ or Class‐Based Rehabilitation for Knee Replacement Recipients: Lessons for Clinical Practice.Justine M. Naylor & Victoria Ko - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):449-458.
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  44.  7
    Knowledge Translation and Improving Practices in Neurological Rehabilitation: Managers' Viewpoint.Anik Girard, Annie Rochette & Barbara Fillion - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):60-67.
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  45.  6
    Introductory Insights Into Patient Preferences for Outpatient Rehabilitation After Knee Replacement: Implications for Practice and Future Research.Justine M. Naylor, Rajat Mittal, Katherine Carroll & Ian A. Harris - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):586-592.
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  46.  7
    A Feminist Perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation: The Relevance of de Beauvoir's Theory.R. N. Kvigne & Ed D. Marit Kirkevold RN - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):79–89.
  47.  2
    Rehabilitation Services Following Total Joint Replacement: A Qualitative Analysis of Key Processes and Structures to Decrease Length of Stay and Increase Surgical Volumes in Ontario, Canada.Carol Fancott, Susan Jaglal, Victoria Quan, Katherine Berg, Cheryl A. Cott, Aileen Davis, John Flannery, Gillian Hawker, Michel D. Landry, Nizar N. Mahomed & Elizabeth Badley - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (4):724-730.
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  48.  2
    Braces, Wheelchairs, and Iron Lungs: The Paralyzed Body and the Machinery of Rehabilitation in the Polio Epidemics.Daniel J. Wilson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (2-3):173-190.
    The successful fund raising appeals of the March of Dimes employed images of cute crippled children standing on braces and forearm crutches, sitting in wheelchairs, or confined to iron lungs. Those who had to use these devices as a result of polio, however, were often stigmatized as cripples. American cultural antipathy to these assistive devices meant that polio survivors often had to overcome an emotional and psychological resistance to using them. Whatever their fears, polio survivors quickly discovered the functionality of (...)
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  49.  1
    The Influence of Objective Measurement Tools on Communication and Clinical Decision Making in Neurological Rehabilitation.Sarah F. Tyson, Joanne Greenhalgh, Andrew F. Long & Robert Flynn - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):216-224.
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  50. The Multiplicity of Self: Neuropsychological Evidence and its Implications for the Self as a Construct in Psychological Research.Stan Klein & Cynthia Gangi - 2010 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1191:1-15.
    This paper examines the issue ofwhat the self is by reviewing neuropsychological research,which converges on the idea that the selfmay be more complex and differentiated than previous treatments of the topic have suggested. Although some aspects of self-knowledge such as episodic recollection may be compromised in individuals, other aspects—for instance, semantic trait summaries—appear largely intact. Taken together, these findings support the idea that the self is not a single, unified entity. Rather, it is a set of interrelated, functionally independent (...)
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