Results for 'Neville Wylie'

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  1. The 1929 Prisoners of War Convention and the Building of the Inter-War Prisoner of War Regime.Neville Wylie - 2010 - In Sibylle Scheipers (ed.), Prisoners in War. Oxford University Press.
     
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  2. Archaeology and Critical Feminism of Science: Interview with Alison Wylie.Alison Wylie, Kelly Koide, Marisol Marini & Marian Toledo - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (3):549-590.
    In this wide-ranging interview with three members of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) Wylie explains how she came to work on philosophical issues raised in and by archaeology, describes the contextualist challenges to ‘received view’ models of confirmation and explanation in archaeology that inform her work on the status of evidence and contextual ideals of objectivity, and discusses the role of non-cognitive values in science. She also is pressed to explain what’s feminist about (...)
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    Philosophy From the Ground Up: An Interview with Alison Wylie.Alison Wylie - 2000 - Assemblages 5.
    Alison Wylie is one of the few full-time academic philosophers of the social and historical sciences on the planet today. And fortunately for us, she happens to specialise in archaeology! After emerging onto the archaeological theory scene in the mid-1980s with her work on analogy, she has continued to work on philosophical questions raised by archaeological practice. In particular, she explores the status of evidence and ideals of objectivity in contemporary archaeology: how do we think we know about the (...)
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  4.  2
    A Review of Neville's "Behind the Masks of God"Behind the Masks of God: An Essay Toward Comparative Theology. [REVIEW]David Lochhead & Robert C. Neville - 1994 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 14:227.
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  5.  16
    Response to Ford's “Neville on the One and the Many”.Robert Neville - 1972 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):85-86.
  6.  1
    Comments on Neville's "Behind the Masks of God"Behind the Masks of God: An Essay Toward Comparative Theology.Rita M. Gross & Robert C. Neville - 1994 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 14:221.
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  7.  19
    On Neville's Review of The Boston Personalist Tradition.Robert Neville - 1989 - The Personalist Forum 5 (2):137-147.
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    Response to Ford’s ‘Neville on the One and the Many’.Robert C. Neville - 1972 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):85-86.
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  9.  2
    On Neville’s Review of The Boston Personalist Tradition. Burrow & Robert Neville - 1989 - The Personalist Forum 5 (2):137-147.
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  10.  1
    On Neville’s Review of The Boston Personalist Tradition.Rufus Burrow Jr & Robert Neville - 1989 - The Personalist Forum 5 (2):137-147.
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  11.  70
    Thinking From Things: Essays in the Philosophy of Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 2002 - University of California Press.
    In this long-awaited compendium of new and newly revised essays, Alison Wylie explores how archaeologists know what they know. -/- Preprints available for download. Please see entry for specific article of interest.
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  12.  11
    Boston Confucianism: Portable Tradition in the Late-Modern World.Robert C. Neville - 2000 - State University of New York Press.
    Promoting multiculturalism through renewed East-West and Confucian-Christian dialogue, Neville (philosophy, religion, and theology, Boston U.) fosters the idea ...
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  13.  2
    Legacy Data, Radiocarbon Dating, and RObustness Reasoning.Alison Wylie - unknown
    Archaeologists put a premium on pressing “legacy data” into service, given the notoriously selective and destructive nature of their practices of data capture. Legacy data consist of material and records that been assembled over decades, sometimes centuries, often by means and for purposes long since discredited or superseded. The primary strategies by which archaeologists put the data to work for new purposes are, I argue, secondary retrieval, recontextualization, and experimental modelling. I focus here on a particularly telling and complex example (...)
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  14.  18
    Interdisciplinary Practice.Alison Wylie - 2013 - In William Rathie, Michael Shanks, Timothy Webmoor & Christopher Witmore (eds.), Archaeology in the Making: Conversations Through a Discipline. Routledge. pp. 93-121.
    In commenting on the state of affairs in contemporary archaeology, Wylie outlines an agenda for archaeology as an interdisciplinary science rooted in ethical practices of stewardship. In so doing she lays the foundations for an informed and philosophically relevant “meta-archaeology.”.
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  15.  14
    Epistemological Issues Raised by a Structuralist Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 1982 - In Ian Hodder (ed.), Symbolic and Structural Archaeology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 39-46.
    Insofar as the material residues of interest to archaeologists are cultural and, as such, have specifically symbolic significance, it is argued that archaeology must employ some form of structuralist analysis (i.e. as specifically concerned with this aspect of the material). Wylie examines the prevalent notion that such analysis is inevitably 'unscientific' because it deals with a dimension of material culture which is inaccessible of any direct, empirical investigation, and argues that this rests on an entrenched misconception of science; it (...)
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  16. Young Coleridge and the Philosophers of Nature.Ian Wylie - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    As a young man, Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived in an age of great social change. The political upheavals in America and France, the industrial revolution, and the explosion in humanity's knowledge of the natural order all had a profound effect on Coleridge and radical intellectuals like him. This book examines Coleridge's ideas on science and society in the critical years 1794 to 1796, setting them within the moral, political, and scientific context of the time. Wylie shows how the complex (...)
     
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  17.  22
    Social Constructionist Arguments in Harding's Science and Social Inequality.Alison Wylie - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 201-211.
    Harding’s aim in Science and Social Inequality is to integrate the insights generated by diverse critiques of conventional ideals of truth, value freedom, and unity in science, and to chart a way forward for the sciences and for science studies. Wylie assesses this synthesis as a genre of social constructionist argument and illustrates its implications for questions of epistemic warrant with reference to transformative research on gender-based discrimination in the workplace environment.
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    Realism in Religion: A Pragmatist's Perspective.Robert C. Neville - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    Using the work of pragmatists Peirce andWhitehead in particular to ground his philosophy of religion, Neville surveys a wide swath of twentieth-century theology ...
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  19. Symbols of Jesus: A Christology of Symbolic Engagement.Robert Cummings Neville - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a systematic theology focusing on what makes Jesus important in Christianity. It studies six families of symbols about Jesus, showing how they are true for some people, not true for others, and not meaningful for a third group. Divine creation is analysed in metaphysical and symbolic terms, and religious symbolism is shown to be wholly compatible with a late-modern scientific world view. Robert Cummings Neville, a leading philosophical theologian, presents and illustrates an elaborate theory of religious symbols (...)
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  20. Why Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2003 - In Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge. pp. 26--48.
    Feminist standpoint theory has been marginal to mainstream philosophical analyses of science–indeed, it has been marginal to science studies generally–and it has had an uneasy reception among feminist theorists. Critics of standpoint theory have attributed to it untenable foundationalist assumptions about the social identities that can underpin an epistemically salient standpoint, and implausible claims about the epistemic privilege that should be accorded to those who occupy subdominant social locations. I disentangle what I take to be the promising core of feminist (...)
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  21.  93
    Why Ethical Consumers Don't Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers. [REVIEW]Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139 - 158.
    Despite their ethical intentions, ethically minded consumers rarely purchase ethical products (Auger and Devinney: 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 76, 361-383). This intentions-behaviour gap is important to researchers and industry, yet poorly understood (Belk et al.: 2005, Consumption, Markets and Culture 8(3), 275-289). In order to push the understanding of ethical consumption forward, we draw on what is known about the intention— behaviour gap from the social psychology and consumer behaviour literatures and apply these insights to ethical consumerism. We bring (...)
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  22.  26
    Convergence Versus Divergence of CSR in Developing Countries: An Embedded Multi-Layered Institutional Lens. [REVIEW]Dima Jamali & Ben Neville - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):599-621.
    This paper capitalizes on an institutional perspective to analyze corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations in the Lebanese context. Specifically, the paper compiles a new theoretical framework drawing on a multi-level model of institutional flows by Scott (Institutions and organizations: ideas and interests, 2008 ) and the explicit/implicit CSR model by Matten and Moon (Acad Manag Rev 33(2):404–424, 2008 ). This new theoretical framework is then used to explore the CSR convergence versus divergence question in a developing country context. The findings (...)
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  23. Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2012 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophy Association 86 (2):47-76.
    Standpoint theory is an explicitly political as well as social epistemology. Its central insight is that epistemic advantage may accrue to those who are oppressed by structures of domination and discounted as knowers. Feminist standpoint theorists hold that gender is one dimension of social differentiation that can make such a difference. In response to two longstanding objections I argue that epistemically consequential standpoints need not be conceptualized in essentialist terms, and that they do not confer automatic or comprehensive epistemic privilege (...)
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  24. Value-Free Science?: Ideals and Illusions.Harold Kincaid, John Dupré & Alison Wylie (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    It has long been thought that science is our best hope for realizing objective knowledge, but that, to deliver on this promise, it must be value free. Things are not so simple, however, as recent work in science studies makes clear. The contributors to this volume investigate where and how values are involved in science, and examine the implications of this involvement for ideals of objectivity.
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  25.  49
    Stakeholder Multiplicity: Toward an Understanding of the Interactions Between Stakeholders.Benjamin A. Neville & Bulent Menguc - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):377-391.
    While stakeholder theory has traditionally considered organization’s interactions with stakeholders in terms of independent, dyadic relationships, recent scholarship has pointed to the fact that organizations exist within a complex network of intertwining relationships [e.g., Rowley, T. J.: 1997, The Academy of Management Review 22(4), 887–910]. However, further theoretical and empirical development of the interactions between stakeholders has been lacking. In this paper, we develop a framework for understanding and measuring the effects upon the organization of competing, complementary and cooperative stakeholder (...)
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  26.  73
    From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology, 2017 Dewey Lecture.Alison Wylie - 2017 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 91:118-136.
    I’m often asked why, as a philosopher of science, I study archaeology. Philosophy is so abstract and intellectual, and archaeology is such an earth-bound, data-driven enterprise, what could the connection possibly be? This puzzlement takes a number of different forms. In one memorable exchange in the late 1970s when I was visiting Oxford as a graduate student an elderly don, having inquired politely about my research interests, tartly observed that archaeology isn’t a science, so I couldn’t possibly be writing a (...)
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  27. Standpoint Theory, in Science.Alison Wylie & Sergio Sismondo - 2015 - In James D. Wright (ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Elsevier. pp. 324-330.
    Standpoint theory is based on the insight that those who are marginalized or oppressed have distinctive epistemic resources with which to understand social structures. Inasmuch as these structures shape our understanding of the natural and lifeworlds, standpoint theorists extend this principle to a range of biological and physical as well as social sciences. Standpoint theory has been articulated as a social epistemology and as an aligned methodological stance. It provides the rationale for ‘starting research from the margins’ and for expanding (...)
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  28.  50
    Why Ethical Consumers Don’T Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal Carrington, Benjamin Neville & Gregory Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
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  29.  3
    Why Ethical Consumers Don’T Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
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  30.  13
    Stakeholder Salience Revisited: Refining, Redefining, and Refueling an Underdeveloped Conceptual Tool. [REVIEW]Benjamin A. Neville, Simon J. Bell & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):357-378.
    This article revisits and further develops Mitchell et al.’s (Acad Manag Rev 22(4):853–886, 1997 ) theory of stakeholder identification and salience. Stakeholder salience holds considerable unrealized potential for understanding how organizations may best manage multiple stakeholder relationships. While the salience framework has been cited numerous times, attempts to develop it further have been relatively limited. We begin by reviewing the key contributions of other researchers. We then identify and seek to resolve three residual weaknesses in Mitchell et al.’s ( 1997 (...)
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  31. A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 2015 - In Jonathan Y. Tsou, Alan Richardson & Flavia Padovani (eds.), Objectivity in Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 189-210.
    Innovative modes of collaboration between archaeologists and Indigenous communities are taking shape in a great many contexts, in the process transforming conventional research practice. While critics object that these partnerships cannot but compromise the objectivity of archaeological science, many of the archaeologists involved argue that their research is substantially enriched by them. I counter objections raised by internal critics and crystalized in philosophical terms by Boghossian, disentangling several different kinds of pluralism evident in these projects and offering an analysis of (...)
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  32.  35
    How Archaeological Evidence Bites Back: Strategies for Putting Old Data to Work in New Ways.Alison Wylie - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (2):203-225.
    Archaeological data are shadowy in a number of senses. Not only are they notoriously fragmentary but the conceptual and technical scaffolding on which archaeologists rely to constitute these data as evidence can be as constraining as it is enabling. A recurrent theme in internal archaeological debate is that reliance on sedimented layers of interpretative scaffolding carries the risk that “preunderstandings” configure what archaeologists recognize and record as primary data, and how they interpret it as evidence. The selective and destructive nature (...)
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  33.  4
    The Enduring Influence of a Dangerous Narrative: How Scientists Can Mitigate the Frankenstein Myth.Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich & Ed Finn - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):279-292.
    Reflecting the dangers of irresponsible science and technology, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein quickly became a mythic story that still feels fresh and relevant in the twenty-first century. The unique framework of the Frankenstein myth has permeated the public discourse about science and knowledge, creating various misconceptions around and negative expectations for scientists and for scientific enterprises more generally. Using the Frankenstein myth as an imaginative tool, we interviewed twelve scientists to explore how this science narrative shapes their views and perceptions of (...)
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  34. Representation of Change: Separate Electrophysiological Markers of Attention, Awareness, and Implicit Processing.Diego Fernandez-Duque, Giordana Grossi, Ian Thornton & Helen Neville - 2003 - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 15 (4):491-507.
    & Awareness of change within a visual scene only occurs in subjects were aware of, replicated those attentional effects, but the presence of focused attention. When two versions of a.
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  35. Rethinking Unity as a "Working Hypothesis" for Philosophy: How Archaeologists Exploit the Disunities of Science.Alison Wylie - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (3):293-317.
    As a working hypothesis for philosophy of science, the unity of science thesis has been decisively challenged in all its standard formulations; it cannot be assumed that the sciences presuppose an orderly world, that they are united by the goal of systematically describing and explaining this order, or that they rely on distinctively scientific methodologies which, properly applied, produce domain-specific results that converge on a single coherent and comprehensive system of knowledge. I first delineate the scope of arguments against global (...)
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  36. Women in Philosophy: The Costs of Exclusion—Editor's Introduction.Alison Wylie - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):374-382.
    Philosophy has the dubious distinction of attracting and retaining proportionally fewer women than any other field in the humanities, indeed, fewer than in all but the most resolutely male-dominated of the sciences. This short article introduces a thematic cluster that brings together five short essays that probe the reasons for and the effects of these patterns of exclusion, not just of women but of diverse peoples of all kinds in Philosophy. It summarizes some of the demographic measures of exclusion that (...)
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  37.  16
    “Norming” and “Conforming”: Integrating Cultural and Institutional Explanations for Sustainability Adoption in Business. [REVIEW]Dan V. Caprar & Benjamin A. Neville - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):231-245.
    Sustainability is increasingly a matter of concern in the corporate world. Many business scholars have analyzed the phenomenon from institutional and cultural perspectives, addressing the key questions of what drives the spread of sustainability principles, and also why sustainability adoption varies so widely among organizations and cultures. In this article, we propose that sustainability adoption can be better explained by integrating the insights from the institutional and cultural perspectives. This would break the current practice of choosing one approach or the (...)
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  38.  27
    Critical Distance : Stabilising Evidential Claims in Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 2011 - In Philip Dawid, William Twining & Mimi Vasilaki (eds.), Evidence, Inference and Enquiry. Oup/British Academy.
    The vagaries of evidential reasoning in archaeology are notorious: the material traces that comprise the archaeological record are fragmentary and profoundly enigmatic, and the inferential gap that archaeologists must cross to constitute them as evidence of the cultural past is a peren­nial source of epistemic anxiety. And yet we know a great deal about the cultural past, including vast reaches of the past for which this material record is our only source of evidence. The contents of this record stand as (...)
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  39.  6
    ‘I Just Love Research’: Beliefs About What Makes Researchers Successful.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (4):262-271.
    There is a longstanding belief that research should be a calling more than a job. How does this expectation shape the selection of future researchers? Specifically, undergraduate research experience is credited with increasing students’ success in science and engineering majors and their likelihood to choose careers in science and engineering; thus, how researchers select student laboratory workers has implications for the future population of researchers. After all, because research communities construct knowledge collectively, researchers’ identities and experiences crucially shape knowledge. This (...)
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  40. When Difference Makes a Difference.Alison Wylie - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):1-7.
    Taking seriously the social dimensions of knowledge puts pressure on the assumption that epistemic agents can usefully be thought of as autonomous, interchangeable individuals, capable, insofar as they are rational and objective, of transcending the specificities of personal history, experience, and context. If this idealization is abandoned as the point of departure for epistemic inquiry, then differences among situated knowers come sharply into focus. These include differences in cognitive capacity, experience, and expertise; in access to information and the heuristics that (...)
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  41. Editor’s Pick: Hypatia.Alison Wylie - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):107-111.
    This article is a profile of the journal Hypatia for TPM: its founding, its mission, and central themes that figure in its close to 30 year publication history. When the first issues of Hypatia appeared in the mid-1980s they were the culmination, in the mid-1980s, of a decade-long process of visionary debate in the Society for Women in Philosophy (SWIP) about what form a journal of feminist philosophy should take, and extended discussion of how to make it a reality. The (...)
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  42. Introduction: When Difference Makes a Difference.Alison Wylie - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):1-7.
    Taking seriously the social dimensions of knowledge has put considerable pressure on the assumption that epistemic agents can usefully be thought of as autonomous, interchangeable individuals, capable, insofar as they are rational and objective, of transcending the specificities of personal history, experience, local context. If this idealization is abandoned as the point of departure for epistemic inquiry, then differences among concretely situated knowers come sharply into focus: differences in cognitive capacity, experience, and expertise; in access to information and the interpretive (...)
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  43.  6
    Enhanced Peripheral Visual Processing in Congenitally Deaf Humans is Supported by Multiple Brain Regions, Including Primary Auditory Cortex.Gregory D. Scott, Christina M. Karns, Mark W. Dow, Courtney Stevens & Helen J. Neville - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  44.  6
    How Racism Should Cause Pragmatism to Change.Robert Cummings Neville - 2018 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 39 (1):53.
    "Racism and Anti-Blackness" in America is very bad.1 What has pragmatism had to say about this? Charles S. Peirce was a racist and thought that blacks are inferior.2 Much as most readers of this journal love him for other things, Peirce's pragmatism needs to change in this regard insofar as it bears on his racist views. A significant part of Peirce's racism came from his appreciation of science. Louis Agassiz strongly opposed Darwinian evolution and upheld racist views regarding Africans; he (...)
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  45. Unification and Convergence in Archaeological Explanation: The Agricultural “Wave-of-Advance” and the Origins of Indo-European Languages.Alison Wylie - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (S1):1-30.
    Given the diversity of explanatory practices that is typical of the sciences a healthy pluralism would seem to be desirable where theories of explanation are concerned. Nevertheless, I argue that explanations are only unifying in Kitcher's unificationist sense if they are backed by the kind of understanding of underlying mechanisms, dispositions, constitutions, and dependencies that is central to a causalist account of explanation. This case can be made through analysis of Kitcher's account of the conditions under which apparent improvements in (...)
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  46.  1
    Normative Cultures.Robert Cummings Neville - 1995 - State University of New York Press.
    This is a philosophic study of theory and practical reason focusing on social obligation and personal responsibility. It draws on Chinese as well as Western Traditions of philosophy.
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  47. Gender Theory and the Archaeological Record.Alison Wylie - 1991 - In Margaret W. Conkey & Joan M. Gero (eds.), Engendering Archaeology: Women and Prehistory. Blackwell. pp. 31-54.
  48.  2
    Visual Working Memory Continues to Develop Through Adolescence.Elif Isbell, Keisuke Fukuda, Helen J. Neville & Edward K. Vogel - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  49.  6
    Recovery of the Measure: Interpretation and Nature.Robert Cummings Neville - 1989 - State University of New York Press.
    The author constructs a philosophy of nature dealing with being, identity, value, space, time, motion, and causality, and uses that as a basis for a theory of hermeneutics to address contemporary problems of interpretation.
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  50.  4
    Coming to Terms with the Value(s) of Science: Insights From Feminist Science Scholarship.Alison Wylie & Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 2007 - In Harold Kincaid, John Dupre & Alison Wylie (eds.), Value-Free Science? Ideals and Illusions. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 58-86.
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