Results for 'New technologies'

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  1.  14
    Opinion on the Ethical Implications of New Health Technologies and Citizen Participation.European Group on Ethics in Science & New Technologies - 2016 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 20 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft und Ethik Jahrgang: 20 Heft: 1 Seiten: 293-302.
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  2.  14
    How to Object to Radically New Technologies on the Basis of Justice: The Case of Synthetic Biology.David Hunter - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (8):426-434.
    A recurring objection to the exploration, development and deployment of radical new technologies is based on their implications with regards to social justice. In this article, using synthetic biology as an example, I explore this line of objection and how we ought to think about justice in the context of the development and introduction of radically new technologies. I argue that contrary to popular opinion, justice rarely provides a reason not to investigate, develop and introduce radical new (...), although it may have significant implications for how they ought to be introduced. In particular I focus on the time dependency of justice objections and argue that often these function by looking only at the implications of the introduction of the technology at the point of introduction, rather than the more important long-term impact on patterns of distribution and opportunity. (shrink)
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  3. New Technologies and Lyotard's Aesthetics.Ashley Woodward - 2006 - Literaria Pragensia 16 (32):14-35.
    One of the less-appreciated modalities of Lyotard’s rethinking of aesthetics is a consideration of the way that technologies, and in particular information technologies, reconfigure the nature of aesthetic experience. For Lyotard, information technology presents a particular problem in relation to the arts and aesthetic experience. When art uses communication technologies themselves as its matter or medium, the “traditional” model of aesthetic experience becomes problematised. Lyotard argues that this is the case because information technologies determine or “program” (...)
     
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  4.  58
    Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: The Role of Analogies in Bioethical Analysis and Argumentation Concerning New Technologies[REVIEW]Bjørn Hofmann, Jan Helge Solbakk & Søren Holm - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (5):397-413.
    New medical technologies provide us with new possibilities in health care and health care research. Depending on their degree of novelty, they may as well present us with a whole range of unforeseen normative challenges. Partly, this is due to a lack of appropriate norms to perceive and handle new technologies. This article investigates our ways of establishing such norms. We argue that in this respect analogies have at least two normative functions: they inform both our understanding and (...)
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  5.  5
    Challenges for a Pragmatic Philosophy of New Technologies.Hans Lenk - forthcoming - Axiomathes:1-17.
    An epistemology mainly oriented at a philosophical discussion of natural sciences and technology is sketched out on the basis of the author’s “methodological scheme-interpretationism” combining a realistic and a perspectival pragmatic approach. - In the main part, 12 characteristic features of the New Technologies are presented and discussed as, e.g., operationalization, computerization, models and modularity, virtuality and artificiality, interdisciplinary interaction, comprehensive and complex systems, telematization and remote control, robotics and AI technology and automatization as well as “socio-eco-techno-systems”, technology-driven globalization (...)
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  6. New Technologies and Alienation: Some Critical Reflections.Douglas Kellner - unknown
    The developing countries are currently undergoing a perhaps unprecedented technological revolution that has given new credence and life to the concept of alienation after a period of relative decline in which M arxian, existentialist, and other modern discourses were replaced with postmodern perspectives skeptical or critical of the concept of alienation. In this paper, I want to suggest that emergent information and communication technologies and the restructuring of global capitalism require us to rethink the problematics of technology and alienation. (...)
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  7. New Technologies, TechnoCities, and the Prospects for Democratization.Douglas Kellner - unknown
    The current explosion of new technologies and furious debates over their substance, trajectory, and effects poses two major challenges to critical social theory and a radical democratic politics: first, how to theorize the dramatic changes in every aspect of life that the new technologies are producing; and, secondly, how to utilize the new technologies to promote progressive social change to create a more egalitarian and democratic society in an era marked by rampant technological development and the seeming (...)
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  8.  28
    Privacy in the Face of New Technologies of Surveillance.Mark Tunick - 2000 - Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (3):259-277.
    This article addresses the question of whether an expectation of privacy is reasonable in the face of new technologies of surveillance, by developing a principle that best fits our intuitions. A "no sense enhancement" principle which would rule out searches using technologically sophisticated devices is rejected. The paper instead argues for the "mischance principle," which proscribes uses of technology that reveal what could not plausibly be discovered accidentally without the technology, subject to the proviso that searches that serve a (...)
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  9. New Technologies, the Precautionary Principle, and Public Participation.Laurence Boisson de Chazournes - 2009 - In Thérèse Murphy (ed.), New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. New Technologies And The Ethics Of Extreme Risks.Martin Peterson - 2001 - Ends and Means 5 (2).
    In this paper I intend to discuss social decision-making involving extreme risks. By an extreme risk, I mean a potential outcome of an act for which the probability is low, but whose negative value is high. Extreme risks are often discussed when new technologies are introduced into society. Nuclear power and genetic engineering are two well-known examples.
     
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  11.  12
    What is the Point of Thinking of New Technologies as Social Experiments?Martin Peterson - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):78-83.
    In this paper I respond to van de Poel’s claim that new technologies should be conceived as ongoing social experiments, which is an idea originally introduced by Schinzinger and Martin in the 1970s. I discuss and criticize three possible motivations for thinking of new technologies as ongoing social experiments.
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  12. The Economics of Innovation, New Technologies and Structural Change.Cristiano Antonelli - 2002 - Routledge.
    The ongoing process of revising and rethinking the foundations of economic theory leads to great complexities and contradictions at the heart of economics. ‘Economics of innovation’ provides a fertile challenge to standard economics, and one that can help it overcome its many criticisms. This authoritative book from Cristiano Antonelli provides a systematic account of recent advances in the economics of innovation. By integrating this account with the economics of technological change, this exceptional book elaborates an understanding of the effects of (...)
     
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  13. New Technologies and the Law in War and Peace.William H. Boothby (ed.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Policymakers, legislators, scientists, thinkers, military strategists, academics, and all those interested in understanding the future want to know how twenty-first century scientific advance should be regulated in war and peace. This book tries to provide some of the answers. Part I summarises some important elements of the relevant law. In Part II, individual chapters are devoted to cyber capabilities, highly automated and autonomous systems, human enhancement technologies, human degradation techniques, the regulation of nanomaterials, novel naval technologies, outer space, (...)
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  14. New Technologies and Human Rights.Thérèse Murphy (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and other (...)
     
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  15. Repetition, Revolution, and Resonance : An Introduction to New Technologies and Human Rights.Thérèse Murphy - 2009 - In New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
  16. Unborn Mothers: The Old Rhetoric of New Reproductive Technologies.Lisa Guenther - 2005 - Radical Philosophy 130.
    In 2003, The Guardian newspapers ran an article with the headline, “Prospect of babies from unborn mothers.” A team of Israeli researchers had been attempting to grow viable eggs from the ovarian tissue of aborted fetuses for use in fertility treatments such as IVF. The rhetoric of “unborn mothers” poses new challenges to the liberal feminist discourse of personhood. How do we articulate the ethical issues involved in harvesting eggs from an aborted fetus, without resurrecting the debate over whether this (...)
     
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  17. New Reproductive Technologies Are Morally Problematic.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2000 - In James Torr (ed.), Medical Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
    A short article examining the problems of the fertility industry, commodifying human life and allowing unaccountable third parties to create children in ways that undermine their identity by way of donor conception, human cloning and artificial reproductive techniques.
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  18.  48
    Is Species Integrity a Human Right? A Rights Issue Emerging From Individual Liberties with New Technologies.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2014 - Human Rights Review 15 (2):177-199.
    Currently, some philosophers and technicians propose to change the fundamental constitution of Homo sapiens, as by significantly altering the genome, implanting microchips in the brain, and pursuing related techniques. Among these proposals are aspirations to guide humanity’s evolution into new species. Some philosophers have countered that such species alteration is unethical and have proposed international policies to protect species integrity; yet, it remains unclear on what basis such right to species integrity would rest. An answer may come from an unexpected (...)
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  19. Shared Decision-Making, Gender and New Technologies.Kristin Zeiler - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):279-287.
    Much discussion of decision-making processes in medicine has been patient-centred. It has been assumed that there is, most often, one patient. Less attention has been given to shared decision-making processes where two or more patients are involved. This article aims to contribute to this special area. What conditions need to be met if decision-making can be said to be shared? What is a shared decision-making process and what is a shared autonomous decision-making process? Why make the distinction? Examples are drawn (...)
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  20.  14
    Analyses of Acceptability Judgments Made Toward the Use of Nanocarrier-Based Targeted Drug Delivery: Interviews with Researchers and Research Trainees in the Field of New Technologies.Vanessa Chenel, Patrick Boissy, Jean-Pierre Cloarec & Johane Patenaude - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):199-215.
    The assessment of nanotechnology applications such as nanocarrier-based targeted drug delivery has historically been based mostly on toxicological and safety aspects. The use of nanocarriers for TDD, a leading-edge nanomedical application, has received little study from the angle of experts’ perceptions and acceptability, which may be reflected in how TDD applications are developed. In recent years, numerous authors have maintained that TDD assessment should also take into account impacts on ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social issues in order to lead (...)
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  21.  16
    The Role of Research for the Social Shaping of New Technologies: Designing a Research Strategy. [REVIEW]Thoralf Ulrick Qvale - 1994 - AI and Society 8 (3):245-269.
    With increasing flexibility of technology and a shift towards competence being the core of competitive edge in worklife, the need for new organizational concepts or models which givejoint optimization across human and technological dimensions has been acknowledged in leading, innovative enterprises. National crossdisciplinary research based productivity programmes are appearing in several countries. Due to internationalization and the general shortcomings of bureaucratic organizational forms, regional networks of enterprises in cooperation with public R&D institutions seem to provide answers to needs of regions (...)
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  22.  7
    New Technologies as Prosthesis of Cognitive System.Anna Sarosiek - 2016 - Semina Scientiarum 15:64-76.
    The aim of the paper is to show the way in which human cognitive system uses external prostheses. Currently developed technologies provide human beings with tools that change their way of functioning in the environment, their understanding and the perspective from which they perceive the world. Modifying systems of thoughts, reasoning and modes of operation non­‑biological prostheses extend human cognitive system. A human being uses non­‑biological interfaces for processing information from the external world.
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  23.  10
    Usefulness and risk in the consumption of new technologies at early ages from the parent perspective.Yaritza García Ortiz & Machado Álvarez - 2015 - Humanidades Médicas 15 (1):88-106.
    Introducción. En la actualidad la relación de los niños con las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones se inicia desde muy temprano, mediado por la figura de sus padres y contrario a los criterios de gran parte de la comunidad científica por sus potenciales efectos adversos. Objetivo. El estudio tuvo como objetivo identificar los criterios de los padres de la ciudad de Santa Clara sobre la utilidad y el riesgo del consumo de las tecnologías de la información y las (...)
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  24.  4
    ‘Medicine’s Next Goldmine?’ The Implications of New Genetic Health Technologies for the Health Service.Michael Calnan, David Wainwright, Peter Glasner, Ruth Newbury-Ecob & Ewan Ferlie - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):33-41.
    There is considerable uncertainty about the implications of the new genetics for health services. These are the enthusiasts who argue that molecular genetics will transform health care and others argue that the scope for genetic interventions is limited. The aim of this paper is to examine some of the questions, tensions and difficulties which face health care providers particularly in developed countries as they try to come to terms with the dilemmas raised by new genetic health care technologies (NGHTs). (...)
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  25.  1
    New Technologies Smart, or Harm Work-Family Boundaries Management? Gender Differences in Conflict and Enrichment Using the JD-R Theory.Chiara Ghislieri, Federica Emanuel, Monica Molino, Claudio G. Cortese & Lara Colombo - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  26.  35
    How To Welcome New Technologies.John Harris - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):166-172.
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  27.  18
    Why New Technologies Should Be Conceived as Social Experiments.Ibo van de Poel - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):352-355.
  28.  8
    Adoption of New Technologies by Smallholder Farmers: The Contributions of Extension, Research Institutes, Cooperatives, and Access to Cash for Improving Tef Production in Ethiopia.Anne M. Cafer & J. Sanford Rikoon - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (3):685-699.
    Agricultural intensification and extensification are standard responses to ecological and economic vulnerability among smallholder communities. Climate change has exacerbated this vulnerability and thrown the complexity of and critical need for managing a healthy natural resource base while increasing on-farm productivity into sharp light. Sustainable intensification is one of many mechanisms for accomplishing this balancing act. This study examines the adoption of sustainable intensification practices, namely input packages focused on tef row planting—designed to boost yield and promote more efficient use of (...)
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  29.  1
    Evolving Trends in Supply Chain Management: Complexity, New Technologies, and Innovative Methodological Approaches.Salvatore Cannella, Roberto Dominguez, Jose M. Framinan & Borja Ponte - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-3.
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  30.  24
    Can Continental Philosophy Deal with the New Technologies?Don Ihde - 2012 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):321-332.
  31.  30
    The New Enhancement Technologies and the Place of Vulnerability in Our Lives.John G. Quilter - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):9-27.
    What is the place of vulnerability in our lives? The current debate about the ethics of enhancement technologies provides a context in which to think about this question. In my view, the current debate is likely to be fruitless, largely because we bring the wrong ethical resources to bear on its questions. In this article, I recall an important, but currently neglected, role that moral concepts play in our thinking, a role they should especially play in relation to the (...)
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  32.  6
    Editors’ Overview: Experiments, Ethics, and New Technologies.Neelke Doorn, Shannon Spruit & Zoë Robaey - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):607-611.
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  33.  3
    Reshaping What Counts as Care: Older People, Work and New Technologies.Celia Roberts & Maggie Mort - 2009 - Alter: revue de phénoménologie 3 (2):138-158.
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  34.  91
    Risk and Distributive Justice: The Case of Regulating New Technologies.Maria Paola Ferretti - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3): 501-515.
    There are certain kinds of risk for which governments, rather than individual actors, are increasingly held responsible. This article discusses how regulatory institutions can ensure an equitable distribution of risk between various groups such as rich and poor, and present and future generations. It focuses on cases of risk associated with technological and biotechnological innovation. After discussing various possibilities and difficulties of distribution, this article proposes a non-welfarist understanding of risk as a burden of cooperation.
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  35. Priority Setting for New Technologies in Medicine: A Qualitative Study.Peter Singer, Douglas K. Martin, Mita Giacomini & Laura Purdy - 2000 - British Medical Journal 321:1316-1318.
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  36. Intellectuals and New Technologies.Douglas Kellner - unknown
    Critical intellectuals were traditionally those who utilized their skills of speaking and writing to denounce injustices and abuses of power, and to fight for truth, justice, progress, and other positive values. In the words of Jean-Paul Sartre (1974: 285), "the duty of the intellectual is to denounce injustice wherever it occurs." The modern critical intellectual's field of action was what Habermas (1989) called the public sphere of democratic debate, political dialogue, and the writing and discussion of newspapers, journals, pamphlets, and (...)
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  37.  24
    Wising Up : The Public and New Technologies.Robin Grove-White, , Phil Macnaghten, & Brian Wynne - 2000 - Lancaster University: Centre for the Study of Environmental Change.
  38.  5
    New Technologies for the Understanding, Assessment, and Intervention of Emotion Regulation.Desirée Colombo, Javier Fernández-Álvarez, Azucena García Palacios, Pietro Cipresso, Cristina Botella & Giuseppe Riva - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  39.  20
    New Technologies Should Not Be Treated as Social Experiments.Martin B. Peterson - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):346-348.
  40.  22
    The Ethics of Attaching Research Conditions to Access to New Health Technologies.S. Holland & T. Hope - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):366-371.
    Decisions on which new health technologies to provide are controversial because of the scarcity of healthcare resources, the competing demands of payers, providers and patients and the uncertainty of the evidence base. Given this, additional information about new health technologies is often considered valuable. One response is to make access to a new health technology conditional on further research. Access can be restricted to patients who participate in a research study, such as a randomised controlled trial; alternatively, a (...)
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  41.  10
    Ethical Assessment of New Technologies: A Meta‐Methodology.Ian Harris, Richard C. Jennings, David Pullinger, Simon Rogerson & Penny Duquenoy - 2011 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (1):49-64.
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  42. Enabling Democratic Deliberation: How Managed Care Organizations Ought to Make Decisions About Coverage for New Technologies.Norman Daniels - 1999 - In Stephen Macedo (ed.), Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement. Oxford University Press. pp. 198--210.
     
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  43.  6
    How Technology Features Influence Public Response to New Agrifood Technologies.Lambertus Lotz, Ivo Lans, Sanne Heijting, Suzanne Dijk, Machiel Reinders & Amber Ronteltap - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):643-672.
    New agrifood technologies are often difficult to grasp for the public, which may lead to resistance or even rejection. Insight into which technology features determine public acceptability of the technology could offer guidelines for responsible technology development. This paper systematically assesses the relative importance of specific technology features for consumer response in the agrifood domain in two consecutive studies. Prominent technology features were selected from expert judgment and literature. The effects of these features on consumer evaluation were tested in (...)
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  44.  10
    Targeted Killing with Drones? Old Arguments, New Technologies.Tamar Meisels - 2018 - Filozofija I Društvo 29 (1):3-16.
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  45.  29
    The First Amendment Meets Some New Technologies.Robert B. Horwitz - 1991 - Theory and Society 20 (1):21-72.
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  46.  4
    The Interrelationship of Ethical Issues in the Transition From Old Paradigms to New Technologies.T. R. Cooper, W. D. Caplan, J. A. Garcia-Prats & B. A. Brody - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (3):243.
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  47.  5
    Societal Challenges and New Technologies.Rosa Bottino - 2016 - International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education 4 (1):46-55.
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  48.  20
    Ethics and New Technologies.Paul T. Durbin - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (Supplement):37-56.
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  49.  13
    Determinants in the Evolution of the European Chemical Industry, 1900-1939: New Technologies, Political Frameworks, Markets, and Companies. Anthony S. Travis, Harm G. Schroter, Ernst Homburg, Peter J. T. Morris. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Allan Johnson - 2000 - Isis 91 (3):622-623.
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  50.  39
    Paul Sollie and Marcus Düwell (Eds): Evaluating New Technologies. Methodological Problems for the Ethical Assessment of Technology Developments.Neelke Doorn - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):217-219.
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