Results for 'Nicholas Appleton'

995 found
Order:
  1. Cultural Awareness and the Claim to Knowledge.Nicholas Appleton - 1977 - Journal of Thought 12 (3):235-44.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  32
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Nicholas Appleton, Loren R. Bonneau, Walter Feinberg, Thomas D. Moore, Albert Grande, W. Eugene Hedley, D. Malcolm Leith, Charles R. Schindler, Leonard Fels, Harry Wagschal, Gregg Jackson, David C. Williams, Gary H. Gilliland, Colin Greer, Gerald L. Gutek, H. Warren Button & Ronald K. Goodenow - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (1-2):39-52.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  62
    Consciousness regained: chapters in the development of mind.Nicholas Humphrey - 1983 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Essays discuss the evolution of consciousness, self-knowledge, aesthetics, religious ecstasy, ghosts, and dreams.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   204 citations  
  4.  12
    Scientific Realism: A Critical Reappraisal.Nicholas Rescher - 1987 - Springer Verlag.
    The increasingly lively controversy over scientific realism has become one of the principal themes of recent philosophy. 1 In watching this controversy unfold in the rather technical way currently in vogue, it has seemed to me that it would be useful to view these contemporary disputes against the background of such older epistemological issues as fallibilism, scepticism, relativism, and the traditional realism/idealism debate. This, then, is the object of the present book, which will recon sider the newer concerns about scientific (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  5.  82
    Reference to Abstract Objects in Discourse.Nicholas Asher - 1993 - Dordrecht, Boston, and London: Kluwer.
    This volume is about abstract objects and the ways we refer to them in natural language. Asher develops a semantical and metaphysical analysis of these entities in two stages. The first reflects the rich ontology of abstract objects necessitated by the forms of language in which we think and speak. A second level of analysis maps the ontology of natural language metaphysics onto a sparser domain--a more systematic realm of abstract objects that are fully analyzed. This second level reflects the (...)
  6.  39
    Rationality: a philosophical inquiry into the nature and the rationale of reason.Nicholas Rescher - 1988 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Contending that only a normative theory of rationality can be adequate to the complexities of the subject, this book explains and defends the view that rationality consists of the intelligent pursuit of appropriate objectives. Rescher considers the mechanics, rationale, and rewards of reason, and argues that social scientists who want to present a theory of rationality while avoiding the vexing complexities of normative deliberations must amend their perspective of the rational enterprise.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  7. Moral Explanations.Nicholas Sturgeon - 1984 - In David Copp & David Zimmerman (eds.), Morality, reason, and truth: new essays on the foundations of ethics. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Allanheld. pp. 49-78.
  8.  14
    Faith and Hinge Epistemology in Calvin’s Institutes.Nicholas Smith - forthcoming - Philosophia Reformata:1-26.
    In mainstream analytic epistemology, Reformed theology has made its presence prominently felt in Reformed epistemology, the view of religious belief according to which religious beliefs can be properly basic and warranted when formed by the proper functioning of the sensus divinitatis, an inborn capacity or faculty for belief in God that can be prompted to generate certain religious beliefs when presented with things (e.g., certain majestic aspects of creation). A major competitor to Reformed epistemology is Wittgensteinian quasi-fideism, a position drawn (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. From knowledge to wisdom: a revolution in the aims and methods of science.Nicholas Maxwell - 1984 - Oxford: Blackwell.
    This book argues for the need to put into practice a profound and comprehensive intellectual revolution, affecting to a greater or lesser extent all branches of scientific and technological research, scholarship and education. This intellectual revolution differs, however, from the now familiar kind of scientific revolution described by Kuhn. It does not primarily involve a radical change in what we take to be knowledge about some aspect of the world, a change of paradigm. Rather it involves a radical change in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  10.  41
    Reasonable doubt: Toward a postmodern defense of reason as an educational aim.Nicholas C. Burbules - 1995 - In Wendy Kohli (ed.), Critical conversations in philosophy of education. New York: Routledge. pp. 82--102.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  11. Representation in Cognitive Science.Nicholas Shea - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    How can we think about things in the outside world? There is still no widely accepted theory of how mental representations get their meaning. In light of pioneering research, Nicholas Shea develops a naturalistic account of the nature of mental representation with a firm focus on the subpersonal representations that pervade the cognitive sciences.
  12. Gender and indigenous knowledge.Maria Helen Appleton, Catherine E. Fernandez & Consuelo Quiroz L. M. Hill - 2011 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader. Duke University Press.
  13.  50
    The uncanny.Nicholas Royle - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    The uncanny is the weird, the strange, the mysterious, a mingling of the familiar and the unfamiliar. Even Freud, patron of the uncanny, had trouble defining it. Yet the uncanny is everywhere in contemporary culture. In this elegant book, Nicholas Royle takes the reader across literature, film, philosophy, and psychoanalysis as he marks the trace of the uncanny in the modern world. Not an introduction in the usual sense, Nicholas Royle's book is a geography of the uncanny as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  14. Leibniz: an introduction to his philosophy.Nicholas Rescher - 1979 - Lanham, MD: University Press of America.
  15.  71
    Charles Taylor: meaning, morals, and modernity.Nicholas H. Smith - 2002 - Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    A clearly written, authoritative introduction to Taylor's work.
  16. Logics of Conversation.Nicholas Asher, Nicholas Michael Asher & Alex Lascarides - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
  17. Pluralism: against the demand for consensus.Nicholas Rescher - 1993 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Nicholas Rescher presents a critical reaction against two currently influential tendencies of thought. On the one hand, he rejects the facile relativism that pervades contemporary social and academic life. On the other hand, he opposes the rationalism inherent in neo-contractarian theory--both in the idealized communicative-contract version promoted in continental European political philosophy by J;urgen Habermas, and in the idealized social contract version of the theory of political justice promoted in the Anglo-American context by John Rawls. Against such tendencies, Rescher's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  18. Leibniz and Locke: a study of the New essays on human understanding.Nicholas Jolley - 1984 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This is the first modern interpretation of Leibniz's comprehensive critique of Locke, the New Essays on Human Understanding. Arguing that the New Essays is controlled by the overriding purpose of refuting Locke's alleged materialism, Jolley establishes the metaphysical and theological motivation of the work on the basis of unpublished correspondence and manuscript material. He also shows the relevance of Leibniz's views to contemporary debates over innate ideas, personal identity, and natural kinds.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  19. Lexical meaning in context: a web of words.Nicholas Asher - 2011 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the meanings of words and how they can combine to form larger meaningful units, as well as how they can fail to combine when the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  20. Epistemology of the Sciences.Nicholas Jardine - 1988 - In C. B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler & Jill Kraye (eds.), The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 685--711.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  21.  39
    Soul dust: the magic of consciousness.Nicholas Humphrey - 2011 - Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
    How is consciousness possible? What biological purpose does it serve? And why do we value it so highly? In Soul Dust, the psychologist Nicholas Humphrey, a leading figure in consciousness research, proposes a startling new theory. Consciousness, he argues, is nothing less than a magical-mystery show that we stage for ourselves inside our own heads. This self-made show lights up the world for us and makes us feel special and transcendent. Thus consciousness paves the way for spirituality, and allows (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  22. Neural mechanisms of decision-making and the personal level.Nicholas Shea - 2012 - In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 1063-1082.
    Can findings from psychology and cognitive neuroscience about the neural mechanisms involved in decision-making can tell us anything useful about the commonly-understood mental phenomenon of making voluntary choices? Two philosophical objections are considered. First, that the neural data is subpersonal, and so cannot enter into illuminating explanations of personal level phenomena like voluntary action. Secondly, that mental properties are multiply realized in the brain in such a way as to make them insusceptible to neuroscientific study. The paper argues that both (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  23. Moral Explanations.Nicholas Sturgeon - 1997 - In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the good life. New York: Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  24.  14
    Navigating the ambiguity of invasiveness: is it warranted? A response to De Marco et al.Nicholas Shane Tito - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):236-237.
    Authors De Marco and colleagues have presented a new model on the concept of invasiveness, redefining both its technical definition and practical implementation.1 While the authors raise valid critiques regarding the discrepancy in definitions, I cannot help but wonder about the purpose of redefining terms for which little confusion, if any, exists? This commentary seeks to scrutinise the rationale supporting the new model in the absence of significant clinical confusion and to explore the implications for clinical practice. Initially, one may (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. From knowledge to wisdom: a revolution for science and the humanities.Nicholas Maxwell - 2007 - London: Pentire Press.
    From Knowledge to Wisdom argues that there is an urgent need, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, to bring about a revolution in science and the humanities. The outcome would be a kind of academic inquiry rationally devoted to helping humanity learn how to create a better world. Instead of giving priority to solving problems of knowledge, as at present, academia would devote itself to helping us solve our immense, current global problems – climate change, war, poverty, population growth, pollution... (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  17
    Empirical inquiry.Nicholas Rescher - 1982 - Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Littlefield.
  27. Higher-Order Metaphysics: An Introduction.Peter Fritz & Nicholas K. Jones - 2024 - In Peter Fritz & Nicholas K. Jones (eds.), Higher-Order Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter provides an introduction to higher-order metaphysics as well as to the contributions to this volume. We discuss five topics, corresponding to the five parts of this volume, and summarize the contributions to each part. First, we motivate the usefulness of higher-order quantification in metaphysics using a number of examples, and discuss the question of how such quantifiers should be interpreted. We provide a brief introduction to the most common forms of higher-order logics used in metaphysics, and indicate a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28.  52
    Jacques Derrida.Nicholas Royle - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    In this entertaining and provocative introduction, Royle offers lucid explanations of various key ideas, including deconstruction, undecidability, iterability, differance, aporia, the pharmakon, the supplement, a new enlightenment, and the democracy to come. He also gives attention, however, to a range of less obvious key ideas of Derrida, such as earthquakes, animals and animality, ghosts, monstrosity, the poematic, drugs, gifts, secrets, war, and mourning. Derrida is seen as an extraordinarily inventive thinker, as well as a brilliantly imaginative and often very funny (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29.  58
    The light of the soul: theories of ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes.Nicholas Jolley - 1990 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The concept of an "idea" played a central role in 17th-century theories of mind and knowledge, but philosophers were divided over the nature of ideas. This book examines an important, but little-known, debate on this question in the work of Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Looking closely at the issues involved, as well as the particular context in which the debate took place, Jolley demonstrates that the debate has serious implications for a number of major topics in 17th-century philosophy.
  30.  12
    Nicholas of Cusa on God as not-other: a translation and an appraisal of De li non aliud.Cardinal Nicholas & Jasper Hopkins - 1983 - Minneapolis: A.J. Banning Press. Edited by Jasper Hopkins.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Pseudoscience and Idiosyncratic Theories of Rational Belief.Nicholas Shackel - 2013 - In M. Pigliucci & M. Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 417-438.
    I take pseudoscience to be a pretence at science. Pretences are innumerable, limited only by our imagination and credulity. As Stove points out, ‘numerology is actually quite as different from astrology as astrology is from astronomy’ (Stove 1991, 187). We are sure that ‘something has gone appallingly wrong’ (Stove 1991, 180) and yet ‘thoughts…can go wrong in a multiplicity of ways, none of which anyone yet understands’ (Stove 1991, 190). Often all we can do is give a careful description of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  17
    The consumption of mass.Nicholas Lee & Rolland Munro (eds.) - 2001 - Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers/Sociological Review.
    This volume sets out to reverse the neglect.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Questions about the Nature of Fiction.Nicholas Rescher - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction updated: theories of fictionality, narratology, and poetics. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 30--38.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. How To Hang A Door: Picking Hinges for Quasi-Fideism.Nicholas Smith - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):51-82.
    : In the epistemology of the late Wittgenstein, a central place is given to the notion of the hinge: an arational commitment that provides a foundation of some sort for the rest of our beliefs. Quasi-fideism is an approach to the epistemology of religion that argues that religious belief is on an epistemic par with other sorts of belief inasmuch as religious and non-religious beliefs all rely on hinges. I consider in this paper what it takes to find the appropriate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35. Aim-Oriented Empiricism Since 1984.Nicholas Maxwell - 2007 - In From knowledge to wisdom: a revolution for science and the humanities. London: Pentire Press.
    This chapter outlines improvements and developments made to aim-oriented empiricism since "From Knowledge to Wisdom" was first published in 1984. It argues that aim-oriented empiricism enables us to solve three fundamental problems in the philosophy of science: the problems of induction and verisimilitude, and the problem of what it means to say of a physical theory that it is unified.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  36. Consciousness, Attention, and Justification.Nicholas Silins & Susanna Siegel - 2014 - In Elia Zardini & Dylan Dodd (eds.), Scepticism and Perceptual Justification. Oxford University Press.
    We discuss the rational role of highly inattentive experiences, and argue that they can provide rational support for beliefs.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  37. The balance and weight of reasons.Nicholas Makins - 2023 - Theoria 89 (5):592-606.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed characterisation of some ways in which our preferences reflect our reasons. I will argue that practical reasons can be characterised along two dimensions that influence our preferences: their balance and their weight. This is analogous to a similar characterisation of the way in which probabilities reflect the balance and weight of evidence in epistemology. In this paper, I will illustrate the distinction between the balance and weight of reasons, and show (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  39
    The scenes of inquiry: on the reality of questions in the sciences.Nicholas Jardine - 1991 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book advocates a radical shift of concern in philosophical, historical, and sociological studies of the sciences, and explores the consequences of such a shift. The historically-oriented first part of the work deals with the ways in which ranges of questions become real and cease to be real for communities of inquirers. The more philosophically-oriented second part of the work introduces the notion of absolute reality of questions, and addresses doubt about the claims of the sciences to have accumulated absolutely (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  39. Methodological Encounters with the Phenomenal Kind.Nicholas Shea - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):307-344.
    Block’s well-known distinction between phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness has generated a large philosophical literature about putative conceptual connections between the two. The scientific literature about whether they come apart in any actual cases is rather smaller. Empirical evidence gathered to date has not settled the issue. Some put this down to a fundamental methodological obstacle to the empirical study of the relation between phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness. Block (2007) has drawn attention to the methodological puzzle and attempted to (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  40.  40
    Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules.Nicholas Bardsley, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffat, Chris Starmer & Robert Sugden - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    The authors explore the history of experiments in economics, provide examples of different types of experiments and show that the growing use of experimental methods is transforming economics into an empirical science.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  41. Complete Philosophical and Theological Treatises of Nicholas of Cusa.Jasper Nicholas & Hopkins - 2001
  42.  14
    Logical metatheorems for accretive and (generalized) monotone set-valued operators.Nicholas Pischke - 2023 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 24 (2).
    Accretive and monotone operator theory are central branches of nonlinear functional analysis and constitute the abstract study of certain set-valued mappings between function spaces. This paper deals with the computational properties of these accretive and (generalized) monotone set-valued operators. In particular, we develop (and extend) for this field the theoretical framework of proof mining, a program in mathematical logic that seeks to extract computational information from prima facie “non-computational” proofs from the mainstream literature. To this end, we establish logical metatheorems (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Language, thought, and falsehood in ancient Greek philosophy.Nicholas Denyer - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    CONTRASTING PREJUDICES TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD How can one say something false? How can one even think such a thing? Since, for example, all men are mortal, ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  44.  63
    Humanity’s End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2010 - Bradford.
    Proposals to make us smarter than the greatest geniuses or to add thousands of years to our life spans seem fit only for the spam folder or trash can. And yet this is what contemporary advocates of radical enhancement offer in all seriousness. They present a variety of technologies and therapies that will expand our capacities far beyond what is currently possible for human beings. In _Humanity's End,_ Nicholas Agar argues against radical enhancement, describing its destructive consequences. Agar examines (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  45. The Philosophy of Decadence.Nicholas D. More - 2019 - In Cambridge Critical Concepts: Decadence and Literature. pp. 184-199.
    The chapter outlines Nietzsche's view of decadence, its history and effects. The philosopher held decadence to be any condition, deceptively thought good, which limits what something or someone can be. This concept informs his critical and affirmative projects, acting as a versatile tool to identify and overcome his own decadence and to resist the decadence of Western culture. Decadence appears in five major areas of concern to Nietzsche: physiology; psychology; art and artists; politics; and philosophy. Physical and mental phenomena provide (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Liberal Eugenics: In Defence of Human Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2004 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this provocative book, philosopher Nicholas Agar defends the idea that parents should be allowed to enhance their children’s characteristics. Gets away from fears of a Huxleyan ‘Brave New World’ or a return to the fascist eugenics of the past Written from a philosophically and scientifically informed point of view Considers real contemporary cases of parents choosing what kind of child to have Uses ‘moral images’ as a way to get readers with no background in philosophy to think about (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  47.  31
    Life's Intrinsic Value: Science, Ethics, and Nature.Nicholas Agar - 2001 - Columbia University Press.
    Are bacteriophage T4 and the long-nosed elephant fish valuable in their own right? Nicholas Agar defends an affirmative answer to this question by arguing that anything living is intrinsically valuable. This claim challenges received ethical wisdom according to which only human beings are valuable in themselves. The resulting biocentric or life-centered morality forms the platform for an ethic of the environment. -/- Agar builds a bridge between the biological sciences and what he calls "folk" morality to arrive at a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  48.  41
    Continuants, identity and essentialism.Nicholas Unwin - 2020 - Synthese 197 (8):3375-3394.
    The question of whether it is permissible to quantify into a modal context is re-examined from an empiricist perspective. Following Wiggins, it is argued that an ontology of continuants implies essentialism, but it is also argued, against Wiggins, that the only conception of necessity that we need to start out with is that of analyticity. Essentialism, of a limited kind, can then be actually generated from this. An exceptionally fine-grained identity criterion for continuants is defended in this context. The debate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. What Some Generic Sentences Mean.Nicholas Asher & Michael Morreau - 1995 - In Greg N. Carlson & Francis Jeffry Pelletier (eds.), The Generic Book. University of Chicago Press. pp. 300--339.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  50.  52
    Liberal Eugenics: In Defence of Human Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2004 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this provocative book, philosopher Nicholas Agar defends the idea that parents should be allowed to enhance their children’s characteristics. Gets away from fears of a Huxleyan ‘Brave New World’ or a return to the fascist eugenics of the past Written from a philosophically and scientifically informed point of view Considers real contemporary cases of parents choosing what kind of child to have Uses ‘moral images’ as a way to get readers with no background in philosophy to think about (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
1 — 50 / 995