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  1. Quaker Business Ethics as MacIntyrean Tradition.Nicholas Burton & Matthew Sinnicks - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):507-518.
    This paper argues that Quaker business ethics can be understood as a MacIntyrean tradition. To do so, it draws on three key MacIntyrean concepts: community, compartmentalisation, and the critique of management. The emphasis in Quaker business ethics on finding unity, as well as the emphasis that Quaker businesses have placed on serving their local areas, accords with MacIntyre’s claim that small-scale community is essential to human flourishing. The emphasis on integrity in Quaker business ethics means practitioners are well-placed to resist (...)
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  2.  14
    Moral Identity and the Quaker tradition: Moral Dissonance Negotiation in the WorkPlace.Nicholas Burton & Mai Chi Vu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):127-141.
    Moral identity and moral dissonance in business ethics have explored tensions relating to moral self-identity and the pressures for identity compartmentalization in the workplace. Yet, the connection between these streams of scholarship, spirituality at work, and business ethics is under-theorized. In this paper, we examine the Quaker tradition to explore how Quakers’ interpret moral identity and negotiate the moral dissonance associated with a divided self in work organizations. Specifically, our study illuminates that while Quakers’ share a tradition-specific conception of “Quaker (...)
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    Can We Take the Religion Out of Religious Decision-Making? The Case of Quaker Business Method.Rachel Muers & Nicholas Burton - 2019 - Philosophy of Management 18 (3):363-374.
    In this paper, we explore the philosophical and theological issues that arise when a ‘religious’ process of decision-making, which is normally taken to require specific theological commitments both for its successful use and for its coherent explanation, is transferred into ‘secular’ contexts in which such theological commitments are not shared. Using the example of Quaker Business Method, we show how such a move provokes new theological questions, as well as questions for management studies.
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  4. Quakers, Business and Corporate Responsibility: Lessons and Cases for Responsible Management.Nicholas Burton & Richard Turnbull (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This book explores how the distinctive "Quaker" approach to responsible business is based on honesty, truth and integrity. It analyzes how networks, family and succession are at its heart, and how much this approach offers to current debates on corporate social responsibility, as well as to managers and practitioners in an increasingly complex business world. The contributions in this volume assess the factors that explain the success and prosperity of many Quaker businesses throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, discussing the (...)
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    The Influence of Spiritual Traditions on the Interplay of Subjective and Normative Interpretations of Meaningful Work.Mai Chi Vu & Nicholas Burton - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (2):543-566.
    This paper argues that the principles of spiritual traditions provide normative ‘standards of goodness’ within which practitioners evaluate meaningful work. Our comparative study of practitioners in the Buddhist and Quaker traditions provide a fine-grained analysis to illuminate, that meaningfulness is deeply connected to particular tradition-specific philosophical and theological ideas. In the Buddhist tradition, meaningfulness is temporal and rooted in Buddhist principles of non-attachment, impermanence and depending-arising, whereas in the Quaker tradition, the Quaker testimonies and theological ideas frame meaningfulness as eternal. (...)
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    Micro-Processes of Moral Normative Engagement with CSR Tensions: The Role of Spirituality in Justification Work.Hyemi Shin, Mai Chi Vu & Nicholas Burton - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (2):597-615.
    Although CSR scholarship has highlighted how tensions in CSR implementation are negotiated, little is known about its normative and moral dimension at a micro-level. Drawing upon the economies of worth framework, we explore how spirituality influences the negotiation of CSR tensions at an individual level, and what types of justification work they engage in when experiencing tensions. Our analysis of semi-structured interview data from individuals who described themselves as Buddhist and were in charge of CSR implementations for their organizations shows (...)
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  7. Bring Your Non-Self to Work? The Interaction Between Self-Decentralization and Moral Reasoning.Nicholas Burton & Mai Chi Vu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (2):427-449.
    AbstractSpirituality continues to exert a strong influence in people’s lives both in work and beyond. However, given that spirituality is often non-formalized and personal, we continue to know little about how moral reasoning is strategized. In this paper, we examine how Buddhist leader-practitioners interpret and operationalize a process of self-decentralization based upon Buddhist emptiness theory as a form of moral reasoning. We find that Buddhist leader-practitioners share a common understanding of a self-decentralized identity and operationalize self-decentralization through two practices in (...)
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