132 found
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  1. Plato's Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 1994 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Brickhouse and Smith cast new light on Plato's early dialogues by providing novel analyses of many of the doctrines and practices for which Socrates is best known. Included are discussions of Socrates' moral method, his profession of ignorance, his denial of akrasia, as well as his views about the relationship between virtue and happiness, the authority of the State, and the epistemic status of his daimonion.
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  2.  84
    Socratic Moral Psychology.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Nicholas D. Smith.
    Socrates' moral psychology is widely thought to be 'intellectualist' in the sense that, for Socrates, every ethical failure to do what is best is exclusively the result of some cognitive failure to apprehend what is best. Until publication of this book, the view that, for Socrates, emotions and desires have no role to play in causing such failure went unchallenged. This book argues against the orthodox view of Socratic intellectualism and offers in its place a comprehensive alternative account that explains (...)
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  3. Socrates on Trial.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1990 - Princeton University Press.
    Thomas Brickhouse and Nicholas Smith offer a comprehensive historical and philosophical interpretation of, and commentary on, one of Plato's most widely read works, the Apology of Socrates. Virtually every modern interpretation characterizes some part of what Socrates says in the Apology as purposefully irrelevant or even antithetical to convincing the jury to acquit him at his trial. This book, by contrast, argues persuasively that Socrates offers a sincere and well-reasoned defense against the charges he faces. First, the authors establish a (...)
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  4. Socratic Moral Psychology.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Nicholas D. Smith.
    Socrates' moral psychology is widely thought to be 'intellectualist' in the sense that, for Socrates, every ethical failure to do what is best is exclusively the result of some cognitive failure to apprehend what is best. Until publication of this book, the view that, for Socrates, emotions and desires have no role to play in causing such failure went unchallenged. This book argues against the orthodox view of Socratic intellectualism and offers in its place a comprehensive alternative account that explains (...)
     
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  5.  55
    Socrates on Why the Belief that Death is a Bad Thing is so Ubiquitous and Intractable.Irina Deretić & Nicholas D. Smith - 2020 - The Journal of Ethics 25 (1):107-122.
    As a cognitivist about emotions, Socrates takes the fear of death to be a belief that death is a bad thing for the one who dies. Socrates, however, thinks there are reasons for thinking death is not a bad thing at all, and might even be a blessing. So the question considered in this paper is: how would Socrates explain the fact that so many people believe death is bad?
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  6. Keith Lehrer on the basing relation.Hannah Tierney & Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 161 (1):27-36.
    In this paper, we review Keith Lehrer’s account of the basing relation, with particular attention to the two cases he offered in support of his theory, Raco (Lehrer, Theory of knowledge, 1990; Theory of knowledge, (2nd ed.), 2000) and the earlier case of the superstitious lawyer (Lehrer, The Journal of Philosophy, 68, 311–313, 1971). We show that Lehrer’s examples succeed in making his case that beliefs need not be based on the evidence, in order to be justified. These cases show (...)
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  7. Plato.Nicholas D.and Thomas Brickhouse Smith - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  8.  80
    Socrates on the Human Condition.Nicholas D. Smith - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):81-95.
  9. Plato on Knowledge as a Power.Nicholas D. Smith - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):145-168.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Plato on Knowledge as a Power1Nicholas D. SmithAt 471C4 in Plato’s Republic, the argument takes a sudden turn when Glaucon becomes impatient with all of the specific prescriptions Socrates has been making, and asks to return to the issue Socrates had earlier set aside—whether or not the city he was describing could ever be brought into being. In response to Glaucon’s impatient question, Socrates articulates his “third wave of (...)
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  10. Socrates on the Emotions.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2015 - Plato Journal 15:9-28.
    In this paper we argue that Socrates is a cognitivist about emotions, but then ask how the beliefs that constitute emotions can come into being, and why those beliefs seem more resistant to change through rational persuasion than other beliefs.
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  11.  76
    Plato's 'Republic': A Critical Guide.Mark L. Mcpherran, G. R. F. Ferrari, Rachel Barney, Julia Annas, Rachana Kamtekar & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2013 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Republic has proven to be of astounding influence and importance. Justly celebrated as Plato's central text, it brings together all of his prior works, unifying them into a comprehensive vision that is at once theological, philosophical, political and moral. The essays in this volume provide a picture of the most interesting aspects of the Republic, and address questions that continue to puzzle and provoke, such as: Does Plato succeed in his argument that the life of justice is the most (...)
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  12. Plato’s Divided Line.Nicholas D. Smith - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):25-46.
  13.  9
    Summoning Knowledge in Plato's Republic.Nicholas D. Smith - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Nicholas D. Smith considers an original interpretation of the Republic, presenting it as a work about knowledge and education. Smith pays particular attention to Plato's use of images as representations of higher realities in education, as well as the power of knowledge in the Republic.
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  14.  54
    Knowledge.Ian Evans & Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - Malden, MA: Polity. Edited by Nicholas D. Smith.
    Introductions to the theory of knowledge are plentiful, but none introduce students to the most recent debates that exercise contemporary philosophers. Ian Evans and Nicholas D. Smith aim to change that. Their book guides the reader through the standard theories of knowledge while simultaneously using these as a springboard to introduce current debates. Each chapter concludes with a “Current Trends” section pointing the reader to the best literature dominating current philosophical discussion. These include: the puzzle of reasonable disagreement; the so-called (...)
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  15. Socrates and the Unity of the Virtues.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1997 - The Journal of Ethics 1 (4):311-324.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that each of the virtue-terms refers to one thing (: 333b4). But in the Laches (190c8–d5, 199e6–7), Socrates claims that courage is a proper part of virtue as a whole, and at Euthyphro 11e7–12e2, Socrates says that piety is a proper part of justice. But A cannot be both identical to B and also a proper part of B – piety cannot be both identical to justice and also a proper part of justice. In this (...)
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  16. Socratic moral psychology.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2013 - In John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.), The Bloomsbury companion to Socrates. New York: Continuum.
  17.  34
    Socrates on the Emotions.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2015 - Plato Journal 15:9-28.
    In Plato’s Protagoras, Socrates clearly indicates that he is a cognitivist about the emotions—in other words, he believes that emotions are in some way constituted by cognitive states. It is perhaps because of this that some scholars have claimed that Socrates believes that the only way to change how others feel about things is to engage them in rational discourse, since that is the only way, such scholars claim, to change another’s beliefs. But in this paper we show that Socrates (...)
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  18.  47
    The Bloomsbury companion to Socrates.John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2013 - New York: Continuum.
    Featuring chapters by leading international scholars in Ancient Philosophy, the is a comprehensive one volume reference to guide to Socrates' thought.
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  19. Plato and Aristotle on the nature of women.Nicholas D. Smith - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (4):467-478.
  20.  67
    Did Plato Write the "Alcibiades I?".Nicholas D. Smith - 2004 - Apeiron 37 (2):93-108.
  21. Socrates’ Elenctic Mission.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1991 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9:131-159.
     
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  22. Socratic teaching and Socratic method.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2009 - In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
  23.  22
    Methods of Interpreting Plato and his Dialogues.James Carl Klagge & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    In this supplementary volume, a number of renowned scholars of Plato reflect upon their interpretive methods. Topics covered include the use of ancient authorities in interpreting Plato's dialogues, Plato's literary and rhetorical style, his arguments and characters, and his use of the dialogue form. The collection is not intended as a comprehensive survey of methodological approaches; rather it offers a number of different perspectives and clearly articulated interpretations by leading scholars in the field.
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  24.  48
    Reason and religion in Socratic philosophy.Nicholas D. Smith & Paul Woodruff (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together mostly previously unpublished studies by prominent historians, classicists, and philosophers on the roles and effects of religion in Socratic philosophy and on the trial of Socrates. Among the contributors are Thomas C. Brickhouse, Asli Gocer, Richard Kraut, Mark L. McPherran, Robert C. T. Parker, C. D. C. Reeve, Nicholas D. Smith, Gregory Vlastos, Stephen A. White, and Paul B. Woodruff.
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  25.  53
    Response to critics.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):234-248.
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  26.  12
    Socrates on Self-Improvement: Knowledge, Virtue, and Happiness.Nicholas D. Smith - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    What model of knowledge does Plato's Socrates use? In this book, Nicholas D. Smith argues that it is akin to knowledge of a craft which is acquired by degrees, rather than straightforward knowledge of facts. He contends that a failure to recognize and identify this model, and attempts to ground ethical success in contemporary accounts of propositional or informational knowledge, have led to distortions of Socrates' philosophical mission to improve himself and others in the domain of practical ethics. He shows (...)
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  27. Partnership with God: a partial solution to the problem of petitionary prayer.Nicholas D. Smith & Andrew C. Yip - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):395-410.
    Why would God make us ask for some good He might supply, and why would it be right for God to withhold that good unless and until we asked for it? We explain why present defences of petitionary prayer are insufficient, but argue that a world in which God makes us ask for some goods and then supplies them in response to our petitions adds value to the world that would not be available in worlds in which God simply supplied (...)
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  28.  42
    Incurable Souls in Socratic Psychology.Nicholas D. Smith - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):21-36.
  29. Plato on the Power of Ignorance.Nicholas D. Smith - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:51-73.
  30. Socrates' Gods and the Daimonion.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2000 - In Nicholas D. Smith & Paul Woodruff (eds.), Reason and Religion in Socratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 74--88.
     
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  31. Vlastos on the elenchus'.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1984 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 2:185-96.
  32.  6
    Socrates on Punishment and the Law:Apology 25c5-26b2.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2018 - In Marcelo D. Boeri, Yasuhira Y. Kanayama & Jorge Mittelmann (eds.), Soul and Mind in Greek Thought. Psychologial Issues in Plato and Aristotle. Cham: Springer. pp. 37-53.
    In his interrogation of Meletus in Plato’s version of Socrates’ defense speech, Socrates offers an interesting argument that promises to provide important evidence for his views about crime and punishment—if only we can understand how the argument is supposed to work. It is our project in this paper to do that. We argue that there are two main problems with the argument: one is that it is not obvious how to make the argument valid; the other is that the argument (...)
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  33.  35
    Sons and Fathers in Plato’s Euthyphro and Crito.Nicholas D. Smith - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):1-13.
  34.  50
    Socrates and Obedience to the Law.Nicholas D. Smith - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (1):10 - 18.
  35. Plato and The Trial of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2005 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (2):348-351.
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  36.  31
    The trial and execution of Socrates: sources and controversies.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Socrates is one of the most important yet enigmatic philosophers of all time; his fame has endured for centuries despite the fact that he never actually wrote anything. In 399 B.C.E., he was tried on the charge of impiety by the citizens of Athens, convicted by a jury, and sentenced to death (ordered to drink poison derived from hemlock). About these facts there is no disagreement. However, as the sources collected in this book and the scholarly essays that follow them (...)
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  37.  20
    What the Ancients Offer to Contemporary Epistemology.Stephen Cade Hetherington & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This book encourages renewed attention by contemporary epistemologists to an area most of them overlook: ancient philosophy. Readers are invited to revisit writings by Plato, Aristotle, Pyrrho, and others, and to ask what new insights might be gained from those philosophical ancestors. Are there ideas, questions, or lines of thought that were present in some ancient philosophy and that have subsequently been overlooked? Are there contemporary epistemological ideas, questions, or lines of thought that can be deepened by gazing back upon (...)
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  38.  72
    The Divine Sign Did Not Oppose Me.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):511-526.
    After he has been condemned to death, Socrates spends a few minutes talking to the jurors before he is taken away. First, he rebukes those who voted against him for resorting to using the court to kill him when they could have waited and let nature do the same job very soon anyhow, for Socrates is an old man. He next contrasts the evils to which his accusers have resorted to his own unbending resolve never to resort to shameful actions, (...)
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  39. Socrates and the Laws of Athens.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (6):564–570.
    The claim that the citizen's duty is to “persuade or obey” the laws, expressed by the personified Laws of Athens in Plato's Crito, continues to receive intense scholarly attention. In this article, we provide a general review of the debates over this doctrine, and how the various positions taken may or may not fit with the rest of what we know about Socratic philosophy. We ultimately argue that the problems scholars have found in attributing the doctrine to Socrates derive from (...)
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  40. Socrates on How Wrongdoing Damages the Soul.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2007 - The Journal of Ethics 11 (4):337-356.
    There has been little scholarly attention given to explaining exactly how and why Socrates thinks that wrongdoing damages the soul. But there is more than a simple gap in the literature here, we shall argue. The most widely accepted view of Socratic moral psychology, we claim, actually leaves this well-known feature of Socrates’ philosophy absolutely inexplicable. In the first section of this paper, we rehearse this view of Socratic moral psychology, and explain its inadequacy on the issue of the damaging (...)
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  41. Socrates on Akrasia, Knowledge, and the Power of Appearance.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2007 - In Christopher Bobonich & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Akrasia in Greek philosophy: from Socrates to Plotinus. Boston: Brill. pp. 1--18.
     
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  42.  84
    Justice and Dishonesty in Plato’s Republic.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1983 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):79-95.
    In this paper we explore plato's paradoxical remarks about the philosophical rulers' use of dishonesty in the "republic"--Rulers who, On the one hand, Are said to love truth above all else, But on the other hand are encouraged to make frequent use of "medicinal lies." we establish first that plato's remarks are in fact consistent, According to the relevant platonic theories too often forgotten by both critics and defenders of plato. Finally, We reformulate the underlying moral issue of the purported (...)
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  43.  76
    Justice and Dishonesty in Plato's Republic.Nicholas D. Smith & Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1983 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):79-95.
    In this paper we explore plato's paradoxical remarks about the philosophical rulers' use of dishonesty in the "republic"--Rulers who, On the one hand, Are said to love truth above all else, But on the other hand are encouraged to make frequent use of "medicinal lies." we establish first that plato's remarks are in fact consistent, According to the relevant platonic theories too often forgotten by both critics and defenders of plato. Finally, We reformulate the underlying moral issue of the purported (...)
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  44.  16
    Socratic Metaphysics?Nicholas D. Smith - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (4):419-434.
  45.  15
    The Origin of Socrates' Mission.Nicholas D. Smith - 1983 - Journal of the History of Ideas 44 (4):657.
  46. Plato's analogy of soul and state.Nicholas D. Smith - 1999 - The Journal of Ethics 3 (1):31-49.
    In Part I of this paper, I argue that the arguments Plato offers for the tripartition of the soul are founded upon an equivocation, and that each of the valid options by which Plato might remove the equivocation will not produce a tripartite soul. In Part II, I argue that Plato is not wholly committed to an analogy of soul and state that would require either a tripartite state or a tripartite soul for the analogy to hold. It follows that (...)
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  47. Philosophical Reflection on Petitionary Prayer.Nicholas D. Smith - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (3):309-317.
    If God actually answers prayers that petition him for something, then it seems he is willing to withhold some good from the world unless and until someone prays for those goods. But how is this compatible with His benevolence? On the other hand, if God is dedicated to providing every good to us that we may need, it would seem that He would provide these to us even if we did not pray for them. But if so, it would appear (...)
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  48. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2004 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Nicholas D. Smith.
  49.  22
    Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays.Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Euthyrphro, Apology, andCrito portray Socrates' words and deeds during his trial for disbelieving in the Gods of Athens and corrupting the Athenian youth, and constitute a defense of the man Socrates and of his way of life, the philosophic life. The twelve essays in the volume, written by leading classical philosophers, investigate various aspects of these works of Plato, including the significance of Plato's characters, Socrates's revolutionary religious ideas, and the relationship between historical events and Plato's texts.
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  50. How the Prisoners in Plato's Cave Are 'Like Us.'.Nicholas D. Smith - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13:187-204.
     
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