16 found
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  1.  20
    Similarity and Categorisation: Neuropsychological Evidence for a Dissociation in Explicit Categorisation Tasks.Debi Roberson, Jules Davidoff & Nick Braisby - 1999 - Cognition 71 (1):1-42.
  2.  28
    Essentialism, Word Use, and Concepts.Nick Braisby, Bradley Franks & James Hampton - 1996 - Cognition 59 (3):247-274.
  3.  78
    Compositionality and the Modelling of Complex Concepts.Nick Braisby - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (4):479-508.
    The nature of complex concepts has important implications for the computational modelling of the mind, as well as for the cognitive science of concepts. This paper outlines the way in which RVC – a Relational View of Concepts – accommodates a range of complex concepts, cases which have been argued to be non-compositional. RVC attempts to integrate a number of psychological, linguistic and psycholinguistic considerations with the situation-theoretic view that information-carrying relations hold only relative to background situations. The central tenet (...)
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  4. Categorisation of Sexual Orientation: A Test of Essentialism.Nick Braisby & Ian Hodges - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2956--2961.
  5.  25
    On the Psychological Basis for Rigid Designation.Nick Braisby, Bradley Franks & James Hampton - 1994 - In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum. pp. 56--65.
  6.  4
    Partiality and Coherence in Concept Combination.Nick Braisby, Bradley Franks & Terry Myers - 1992 - In Jes Ezquerro (ed.), Cognition, Semantics and Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 179--207.
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  7.  7
    Compositionality and the Modelling of Complex Concepts.Nick Braisby - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (4):479-507.
    The nature of complex concepts has important implications for the computational modelling of the mind, as well as for the cognitive science of concepts. This paper outlines the way in which RVC – a Relational View of Concepts – accommodates a range of complex concepts, cases which have been argued to be non-compositional. RVC attempts to integrate a number of psychological, linguistic and psycholinguistic considerations with the situation-theoretic view that information-carrying relations hold only relative to background situations. The central tenet (...)
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  8.  64
    Semantics Versus Pragmatics in Colour Categorization.Nick Braisby & Bradley Franks - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):181-182.
    We argue that the confusing pattern of evidence concerning colour categorization reported by Saunders & van Brakel is unsurprising. On a perspectival view, categorization may follow semantic or pragmatic attributes. Colour lacks clear semantic attributes; as a result categorization is necessarily pragmatic and context-sensitive. This view of colour categorization helps explain the developmental delay in colour naming.
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  9.  15
    Not so Fast, and Not so Easy: Essentialism Doesn't Emerge From a Simple Heuristic.Nick Braisby - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (5):485-486.
    Cimpian & Salomon's proposal comes unstuck on precisely the claim that inherence is an heuristic, able to deliver simple, shallow outputs that are right most of the time. Instead, the inherence heuristic delivers outputs that imply it is not an heuristic after all, and is simply too fast and too easy a mechanism to do the job of explaining categorisations.
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  10.  44
    What is the Point? Concepts, Description, and Rigid Designation.Bradley Franks & Nick Braisby - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):70-70.
    Millikan's nondescriptionist approach applies an account of meaning to concepts in terms of designation. The essentialism that provides the principal grounds for rigid designation, however, receives no empirical support from concepts. Whatever the grounding, this view not only faces the problems of rigid designation in theories of meaning, it also calls for a role for pragmatics more consonant with descriptionist theories of concepts.
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  11.  18
    Perspectives, Compositionality and Complex Concepts.Nick Braisby - 2005 - In Gerhard Schurz, Edouard Machery & Markus Werning (eds.), Applications to Linguistics, Psychology and Neuroscience. De Gruyter. pp. 179-202.
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  12.  16
    When Are Concepts One or Many?Nick Braisby - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (9):321.
  13.  25
    Why the Dynamical Hypothesis Cannot Qualify as a Law of Qualitative Structure.Nick Braisby, Richard Cooper & Bradley Franks - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):630-631.
    Van Gelder presents the dynamical hypothesis as a novel law of qualitative structure to compete with Newell and Simon's (1976) physical symbol systems hypothesis. Unlike Newell and Simon's hypothesis, the dynamical hypothesis fails to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for cognition. Furthermore, imprecision in the statement of the dynamical hypothesis renders it unfalsifiable.
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  14.  7
    Deference in Categorisation: Evidence for Essentialism?Nick Braisby - unknown
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  15.  18
    A Creationist Myth: Pragmatic Combination Not Feature Creation.Nick Braisby & Bradley Franks - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):19-20.
    Schyns et al. argue that flexibility in categorisation implies “feature creation.” We argue that this notion is flawed, that flexibility can be explained by combinations over fixed feature sets, and that feature creation would in any case fail to explain categorisation. We suggest that flexibility in categorisation is due to pragmatic factors influencing feature combination, rendering feature creation unnecessary.
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  16. Logic, Language and Computation, Volume 3.Patrick Blackburn, Nick Braisby, Lawrence Cavedon & Atsushi Shimojima (eds.) - 2001 - Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    With the rise of the internet and the proliferation of technology to gather and organize data, our era has been defined as "the information age." With the prominence of information as a research concept, there has arisen an increasing appreciation of the intertwined nature of fields such as logic, linguistics, and computer science that answer the questions about information and the ways it can be processed. The many research traditions do not agree about the exact nature of information. By bringing (...)
     
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