Results for 'Nick Johns'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. One: but not the same.John Schwenkler, Nick Byrd, Enoch Lambert & Matthew Taylor - 2021 - Philosophical Studies (6).
    Ordinary judgments about personal identity are complicated by the fact that phrases like “same person” and “different person” have multiple uses in ordinary English. This complication calls into question the significance of recent experimental work on this topic. For example, Tobia (2015) found that judgments of personal identity were significantly affected by whether the moral change described in a vignette was for the better or for the worse, while Strohminger and Nichols (2014) found that loss of moral conscience had more (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  13
    Empiricism and Language Learnability.Nick Chater, Alexander Simon Clark, John A. Goldsmith & Amy Perfors - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This interdisciplinary new work explores one of the central theoretical problems in linguistics: learnability. The authors, from different backgrounds---linguistics, philosophy, computer science, psychology and cognitive science-explore the idea that language acquisition proceeds through general purpose learning mechanisms, an approach that is broadly empiricist both methodologically and psychologically. Written by four researchers in the full range of relevant fields: linguistics, psychology, computer science, and cognitive science, the book sheds light on the central problems of learnability and language, and traces their implications (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3.  62
    Reflecting on Behavioral Spillover in Context: How Do Behavioral Motivations and Awareness Catalyze Other Environmentally Responsible Actions in Brazil, China, and Denmark?Nick Nash, Lorraine Whitmarsh, Stuart Capstick, John Thøgersen, Valdiney Gouveia, Rafaella de Carvalho Rodrigues Araújo, Marie K. Harder, Xiao Wang & Yuebai Liu - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Responding to serious environmental problems, requires urgent and fundamental shifts in our day-to-day lifestyles. This paper employs a qualitative, cross-cultural approach to explore people’s subjective self-reflections on their experiences of pro-environmental behavioral spillover in three countries; Brazil, China, and Denmark. Behavioral spillover is an appealing yet elusive phenomenon, but offers a potential way of encouraging wider, voluntary lifestyle shifts beyond the scope of single behavior change interventions. Behavioral spillover theory proposes that engaging in one pro-environmental action can catalyze the performance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  11
    How did LUCA make a living? Chemiosmosis in the origin of life.Nick Lane, John F. Allen & William Martin - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (4):271-280.
    Despite thermodynamic, bioenergetic and phylogenetic failings, the 81‐year‐old concept of primordial soup remains central to mainstream thinking on the origin of life. But soup is homogeneous in pH and redox potential, and so has no capacity for energy coupling by chemiosmosis. Thermodynamic constraints make chemiosmosis strictly necessary for carbon and energy metabolism in all free‐living chemotrophs, and presumably the first free‐living cells too. Proton gradients form naturally at alkaline hydrothermal vents and are viewed as central to the origin of life. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5. Referees for Ethics, Place and Environment, Volume 1, 1998.John Agnew, Ash Amin, Jacqui Burgess, Robert Chambers, Graham Chapman, Denis Cosgrove, Gouranga Dasvarma, Klaus Dodds, Sally Eden & Nick Entrikin - 1998 - Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (2):269.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  15
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 1991 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  12
    BioEssays 4/2010.Nick Lane, John F. Allen & William Martin - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (4).
    Despite thermodynamic, bioenergetic and phylogenetic failings, the 81‐year‐old concept of primordial soup remains central to mainstream thinking on the origin of life. But soup is homogeneous in pH and redox potential, and so has no capacity for energy coupling by chemiosmosis. Thermodynamic constraints make chemiosmosis strictly necessary for carbon and energy metabolism in all free‐living chemotrophs, and presumably the first free‐living cells too. Proton gradients form naturally at alkaline hydrothermal vents and are viewed as central to the origin of life. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  4
    Countering stereotypes of disability: Disabled children and resistance.John Davis & Nick Watson - 2002 - In Mairian Corker Tom Shakespeare (ed.), Disability/Postmodernity: Embodying Disability Theory. Bloomsbury Publishing. pp. 159--174.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    JS Mill's Elitism.John Skorupski Skorupska, Nick Southgate & Roger Squires - 2008 - In Erich Kofmel (ed.), Anti-Democratic Thought. Imprint Academic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  7
    Double dissociation, modularity, and distributed organization.John A. Bullinaria & Nick Chater - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632-632.
    Müller argues that double dissociations do not imply underlying modularity of the cognitive system, citing neural networks as examples of fully distributed systems that can give rise to double dissociations. We challenge this claim, noting that suchdouble dissociations typically do not “scale-up,” and that even some singledissociations can be difficult to account for in a distributed system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  17
    An Exploratory Study into the Factors Impeding Ethical Consumption.Jeffery P. Bray, Nick Johns & David Kilburn - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):597 - 608.
    Although consumers are increasingly engaged with ethical factors when forming opinions about products and making purchase decisions, recent studies have highlighted significant differences between consumers' intentions to consume ethically, and their actual purchase behaviour. This article contributes to an understanding of this 'Ethical Purchasing Gap' through a review of existing literature, and the inductive analysis of focus group discussions. A model is suggested which includes exogenous variables such as moral maturity and age which have been well covered in the literature, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  12.  12
    Boundaries of Adult LearningThe Learning Society.F. John Taylor, Richard Edwards, Ann Hanson, Peter Raggatt & Nick Small - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (4):465.
  13.  40
    Reimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19.Michael A. Peters, Fazal Rizvi, Gary McCulloch, Paul Gibbs, Radhika Gorur, Moon Hong, Yoonjung Hwang, Lew Zipin, Marie Brennan, Susan Robertson, John Quay, Justin Malbon, Danilo Taglietti, Ronald Barnett, Wang Chengbing, Peter McLaren, Rima Apple, Marianna Papastephanou, Nick Burbules, Liz Jackson, Pankaj Jalote, Mary Kalantzis, Bill Cope, Aslam Fataar, James Conroy, Greg Misiaszek, Gert Biesta, Petar Jandrić, Suzanne S. Choo, Michael Apple, Lynda Stone, Rob Tierney, Marek Tesar, Tina Besley & Lauren Misiaszek - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-44.
    Michael A. Petersa and Fazal Rizvib aBeijing Normal University, Beijing, PR China; bMelbourne University, Melbourne, Australia Our minds are still racing back and forth, longing for a return to ‘no...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14. What Should We Agree on about the Repugnant Conclusion?Stephane Zuber, Nikhil Venkatesh, Torbjörn Tännsjö, Christian Tarsney, H. Orri Stefánsson, Katie Steele, Dean Spears, Jeff Sebo, Marcus Pivato, Toby Ord, Yew-Kwang Ng, Michal Masny, William MacAskill, Nicholas Lawson, Kevin Kuruc, Michelle Hutchinson, Johan E. Gustafsson, Hilary Greaves, Lisa Forsberg, Marc Fleurbaey, Diane Coffey, Susumu Cato, Clinton Castro, Tim Campbell, Mark Budolfson, John Broome, Alexander Berger, Nick Beckstead & Geir B. Asheim - 2021 - Utilitas 33 (4):379-383.
    The Repugnant Conclusion served an important purpose in catalyzing and inspiring the pioneering stage of population ethics research. We believe, however, that the Repugnant Conclusion now receives too much focus. Avoiding the Repugnant Conclusion should no longer be the central goal driving population ethics research, despite its importance to the fundamental accomplishments of the existing literature.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  15. Shakespeare: Out of Court: Dramatizations of Court Society.Graham Holderness, Nick Potter & John Turner - 1990 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book examines six plays by Shakespeare (Love's Labour's Lost, Hamlet, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest) as dramatizations of the Renaissance court in its developing history - a history searched by Shakespeare to disclose its most characteristic gains and losses. For these plays do not simply celebrate Tudor and Stuart rule: they scrutinize it too, in the centre of its institutional theatre of power, the court. This book shows how, if the plays came (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  76
    Reimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19: An EPAT Collective Project.Lauren Misiaszek, Tina Besley, Marek Tesar, Rob Tierney, Lynda Stone, Michael Apple, Suzanne S. Choo, Petar Jandrić, Gert Biesta, Greg Misiaszek, James Conroy, Aslam Fataar, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Pankaj Jalote, Liz Jackson, Nick Burbules, Marianna Papastephanou, Rima Apple, Peter McLaren, Wang Chengbing, Ronald Barnett, Danilo Taglietti, Justin Malbon, John Quay, Susan Robertson, Marie Brennan, Lew Zipin, Yoonjung Hwang, Moon Hong, Radhika Gorur, Paul Gibbs, Gary McCulloch, Fazal Rizvi & Michael A. Peters - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (6):717-760.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Journal of The Cognitive Science Society.Robert L. Goldstone, John R. Anderson, Nick Chater, Andy Clark, Shimon Edelman, Kenneth Forbus, Dedre Gentner, Raymond W. Gibbs Jr, James Greeno & Robert A. Jacobs - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (3).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  8
    Programming norm change.Mehdi Dastani, John-Jules Meyer & Nick Tinnemeier - 2012 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 22 (1-2):151-180.
    To adequately deal with unpredictable and dynamic environments, normative frameworks typically deployed in mechanisms for modifying the norms at runtime are crucial. We present the syntax and operational semantics of programming constructs to facilitate runtime norm modification, allowing a programmer to specify when and how the norms may be changed by external agents or by the normative mechanism. The norms take on the form of conditional obligations and prohibitions, instantiating obligations and prohibitions. We present rule-based constructs for runtime modification of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  3
    Phonological reduction, assimilation, intra-word information structure, and the evolution of the lexicon of English: Why fast speech isn't confusing.Richard Shillcock, John Hicks, Paul Cairns, Nick Chater & Joseph P. Levy - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of The Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 233.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  10
    The second to fourth digit ratio, sociosexuality, and offspring sex ratio.Bernhard Fink, John T. Manning & Nick Neave - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):283-284.
    Previous research has suggested that offspring sex ratio may be influenced by the actions of prenatal sex steroids, principally androgens. The relative length of the second (index finger) to the fourth digit (ring finger) has been reported to be a proxy to prenatal testosterone levels. This trait is sexually dimorphic, such that males display a significantly lower 2D:4D ratio (indicating higher testosterone exposure), and this dimorphism appears robust across different populations. We suggest that digit ratio (2D:4D) may form a useful (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. ‘TaxTrack’: Introducing a Democratic Innovation for Taxation.Jean-Paul Gagnon, Paul Emiljanowicz, Lucy Parry, Bomikazi Zeka, Angela Tan-Kantor, Nick Vlahos, Adrian Bua, Alex Prior & John Hawkins - forthcoming - Australasian Parliamentary Review.
    Abstract: In this article we introduce an input-oriented democratic innovation – that we term ‘TaxTrack’ – which offers individual taxpayers the means to engage with their political economies in three ways. After joining the TaxTrack program, an individual can: (1) see and understand how much, and what types, of taxes they have contributed, (2) see and understand how their tax contributions are, or have been, used, and (3) control what their tax contributions can, or cannot, be spent on. We explain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. John Barker.Nick Zangwill - 2009 - Sztuka I Filozofia (Art and Philosophy) 35.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Peer review versus editorial review and their role in innovative science.Nicole Zwiren, Glenn Zuraw, Ian Young, Michael A. Woodley, Jennifer Finocchio Wolfe, Nick Wilson, Peter Weinberger, Manuel Weinberger, Christoph Wagner, Georg von Wintzigerode, Matt Vogel, Alex Villasenor, Shiloh Vermaak, Carlos A. Vega, Leo Varela, Tine van der Maas, Jennie van der Byl, Paul Vahur, Nicole Turner, Michaela Trimmel, Siro I. Trevisanato, Jack Tozer, Alison Tomlinson, Laura Thompson, David Tavares, Amhayes Tadesse, Johann Summhammer, Mike Sullivan, Carl Stryg, Christina Streli, James Stratford, Gilles St-Pierre, Karri Stokely, Joe Stokely, Reinhard Stindl, Martin Steppan, Johannes H. Sterba, Konstantin Steinhoff, Wolfgang Steinhauser, Marjorie Elizabeth Steakley, Chrislie J. Starr-Casanova, Mels Sonko, Werner F. Sommer, Daphne Anne Sole, Jildou Slofstra, John R. Skoyles, Florian Six, Sibusio Sithole, Beldeu Singh, Jolanta Siller-Matula, Kyle Shields, David Seppi, Laura Seegers, David Scott, Thomas Schwarzgruber, Clemens Sauerzopf, Jairaj Sanand, Markus Salletmaier & Sackl - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (5):359-376.
    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  16
    An epistemically distant God? A critique of John Hick's response to the problem of divine hiddenness.Nick Trakakis - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (2):214–226.
    God is thought of as hidden in at least two ways. Firstly, God's reasons for permitting evil, particularly instances of horrendous evil, are often thought to be inscrutable or beyond our ken. Secondly, and perhaps more problematically, God's very existence and love or concern for us is often thought to be hidden from us (or, at least, from many of us on many occasions). But if we assume, as seems most plausible, that God's reasons for permitting evil will (in many, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  16
    The identification of 100 ecological questions of high policy relevance in the UK.William J. Sutherland, Susan Armstrong-Brown, Paul R. Armsworth, Brereton Tom, Jonathan Brickland, Colin D. Campbell, Daniel E. Chamberlain, Andrew I. Cooke, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Nicholas R. Dusic, Martin Fitton, Robert P. Freckleton, H. Charles J. Godfray, Nick Grout, H. John Harvey, Colin Hedley, John J. Hopkins, Neil B. Kift, Jeff Kirby, William E. Kunin, David W. Macdonald, Brian Marker, Marc Naura, Andrew R. Neale, Tom Oliver, Dan Osborn, Andrew S. Pullin, Matthew E. A. Shardlow, David A. Showler, Paul L. Smith, Richard J. Smithers, Jean-Luc Solandt, Jonathan Spencer, Chris J. Spray, Chris D. Thomas, Jim Thompson, Sarah E. Webb, Derek W. Yalden & Andrew R. Watkinson - 2006 - Journal of Applied Ecology 43 (4):617-627.
    1 Evidence-based policy requires researchers to provide the answers to ecological questions that are of interest to policy makers. To find out what those questions are in the UK, representatives from 28 organizations involved in policy, together with scientists from 10 academic institutions, were asked to generate a list of questions from their organizations. 2 During a 2-day workshop the initial list of 1003 questions generated from consulting at least 654 policy makers and academics was used as a basis for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  3
    Explaining Supervenience.Nick Zagwill - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:509-518.
    I defend the view that supervenience relations need not be explained. My view is that some supervenience relations are brute, and explanatorily ultimate. I examine an argument of Terrence Horgan and Mark Timmons. They aim to rehabilitate John Mackie’s metaphysical queerness argument. But the explanations of supervenience that Horgan and Timmons demand are semantic explanations. I criticize their attempt to explain psychophysical supervenience in this fashion. I then turn to their ‘Twin Earth’ argument against naturalist moral realism. I reconstruct their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  24
    Limits to natural selection.Nick Barton & Linda Partridge - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (12):1075-1084.
    We review the various factors that limit adaptation by natural selection. Recent discussion of constraints on selection and, conversely, of the factors that enhance “evolvability”, have concentrated on the kinds of variation that can be produced. Here, we emphasise that adaptation depends on how the various evolutionary processes shape variation in populations. We survey the limits that population genetics places on adaptive evolution, and discuss the relationship between disparate literatures. BioEssays 22:1075–1084, 2000. © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  28.  8
    Digital Approaches to Music-Making for People With Dementia in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Current Practice and Recommendations.Becky Dowson, Rebecca Atkinson, Julie Barnes, Clare Barone, Nick Cutts, Eleanor Donnebaum, Ming Hung Hsu, Irene Lo Coco, Gareth John, Grace Meadows, Angela O'Neill, Douglas Noble, Gabrielle Norman, Farai Pfende, Paul Quinn, Angela Warren, Catherine Watkins & Justine Schneider - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Before COVID-19, dementia singing groups and choirs flourished, providing activity, cognitive stimulation, and social support for thousands of people with dementia in the UK. Interactive music provides one of the most effective psychosocial interventions for people with dementia; it can allay agitation and promote wellbeing. Since COVID-19 has halted the delivery of in-person musical activities, it is important for the welfare of people with dementia and their carers to investigate what alternatives to live music making exist, how these alternatives are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Levinas in John Mullarkey and Beth Lord (editors) the continuum companion to continental philosophy.Nick Trakakis & Michael Fagenblat - unknown
  30.  14
    The Philosopher-Lobbyist: John Dewey and the People’s Lobby, 1928–1940, written by Mordecai Lee. [REVIEW]Nick C. Sagos - 2017 - Contemporary Pragmatism 14 (4):529-532.
  31. Mill’s radical end of laissez-faire: A review essay of the political economy of progress: John Stuart Mill and modern radicalism. [REVIEW]Nick Cowen - 2018 - The Review of Austrian Economics 31:373–386.
    Can John Stuart Mill’s radicalism achieve liberal egalitarian ends? Joseph Persky’s The Political Economy of Progress is a provocative and compelling discussion of Mill’s economic thought. It is also a defense of radical political economy. Providing valuable historical context, Persky traces Mill’s intellectual journey as an outspoken proponent of laissez-faire to a cautious supporter of co-operative socialism. I propose two problems with Persky’s optimistic take on radical social reform. First, demands for substantive equality have led past radicals to endorse exclusionary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  5
    Vertebrate genome evolution: a slow shuffle or a big bang?Nick G. C. Smith, Robert Knight & Laurence D. Hurst - 1999 - Bioessays 21 (8):697-703.
    In vertebrates it is often found that if one considers a group of genes clustered on a certain chromosome, then the homologues of those genes often form another cluster on a different chromosome. There are four explanations, not necessarily mutually exclusive, to explain how such homologous clusters appeared. Homologous clusters are expected at a low probability even if genes are distributed at random. The duplication of a subset of the genome might create homologous clusters, as would a duplication of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  33.  31
    Ethical issues in human enhancement.Nick Bostrom & Rebecca Roache - 2007 - In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New waves in applied ethics. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 120--152.
    Human enhancement has emerged in recent years as a blossoming topic in applied ethics. With continuing advances in science and technology, people are beginning to realize that some of the basic parameters of the human condition might be changed in the future. One important way in which the human condition could be changed is through the enhancement of basic human capacities. If this becomes feasible within the lifespan of many people alive today, then it is important now to consider the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  34.  6
    David Clark;, Stephen P. H. Clark. Newton’s Tyranny: The Suppressed Scientific Discoveries of Stephen Gray and John Flamsteed. 208 pp., bibl., index. New York: Owl Books, 2001. $14. [REVIEW]Nick Kollerstrom - 2005 - Isis 96 (2):278-279.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  92
    William A. Edmundson: John Rawls: Reticent Socialist. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Pp. 212.). [REVIEW]Nick Cowen - 2019 - The Review of Politics 81:521-524.
    Edmundson has written an admirably concise yet powerful book. It blends a critical account of Rawls’ work with an original case for democratic socialism hewn from Rawlsian stone. In my opinion, this case has some flaws but it remains a timely contribution to the enduring quest for justice and social stability.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Catenins, Wnt signaling and cancer.Nick Barker & Hans Clevers - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (11):961-965.
    Recent studies indicate that plakoglobin may have a similar function to that of β-catenin within the Wnt signaling pathway. β-catenin is known to be an oncogene in many forms of human cancer, following acquisition of stabilizing mutations in amino terminal sequences. Kolligs1 and coworkers show, however, that unlike β-catenin, plakoglobin induces neoplastic transformation of rat epithelial cells in the absence of such stabilizing mutations. Cellular transformation by plakoglobin also appears to be distinct from that of β-catenin in that it requires (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  16
    Explaining the Past in the Geosciences.Giuseppina D'oro, Mark Day, Luke O'sullivan, Jakub Capek, Nick Tosh, Adrian Haddock & Robert John Inkpen - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (4):495-507.
    Abductive reasoning is central to reconstructing the past in the geosciences. This paper outlines the nature of the abductive method and restates it in Bayesian terms. Evidence plays a key role in this working method and, in particular, traces of the past are important in this explanatory framework. Traces, whether singularly or as groups, are interpreted within the context of the event for which they have evidential claims. Traces are not considered as independent entities but rather as inter-related pieces of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  4
    Neuroanatomic basis of impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury: Findings from early computed tomography.Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Toad G. Nick & Stuart A. Yablon - 2005 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):287-300.
  39.  16
    Planctomycetes and eukaryotes: A case of analogy not homology.James O. McInerney, William F. Martin, Eugene V. Koonin, John F. Allen, Michael Y. Galperin, Nick Lane, John M. Archibald & T. Martin Embley - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (11):810-817.
    Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydia are prokaryotic phyla, sometimes grouped together as the PVC superphylum of eubacteria. Some PVC species possess interesting attributes, in particular, internal membranes that superficially resemble eukaryotic endomembranes. Some biologists now claim that PVC bacteria are nucleus‐bearing prokaryotes and are considered evolutionary intermediates in the transition from prokaryote to eukaryote. PVC prokaryotes do not possess a nucleus and are not intermediates in the prokaryote‐to‐eukaryote transition. Here we summarise the evidence that shows why all of the PVC traits (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  20
    Popular culture in (and out of) American political science.Nick Dorzweiler - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (1):138-159.
    Historically, American political science has rarely engaged popular culture as a central topic of study, despite the domain’s outsized influence in American community life. This article argues that this marginalization is, in part, the by-product of long-standing disciplinary debates over the inadequate political development of the American public. To develop this argument, the article first surveys the work of early political scientists, such as John Burgess and Woodrow Wilson, to show that their reformist ambitions largely precluded discussion of mundane activities (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Hawthorne’s might-y failure: a reply to “Knowledge and epistemic necessity”.Nick Colgrove & Trent Dougherty - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1165-1177.
    In “Knowledge and epistemic necessity,” John Hawthorne gives a defense of what he rightly calls the “standard approach” to epistemic possibility against what he calls a new “competing idea” presented by Dougherty and Rysiew which he notes has been “endorsed and elaborated upon” by Fantl and McGrath. According to the standard approach, roughly, p is epistemically possible for S if S doesn’t know that not-p. The new approach has it that p is epistemically possible if p has a non-zero epistemic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  5
    Identifying Optimum Performance Trade-Offs Using a Cognitively Bounded Rational Analysis Model of Discretionary Task Interleaving.Christian P. Janssen, Duncan P. Brumby, John Dowell, Nick Chater & Andrew Howes - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):123-139.
    We report the results of a dual-task study in which participants performed a tracking and typing task under various experimental conditions. An objective payoff function was used to provide explicit feedback on how participants should trade off performance between the tasks. Results show that participants’ dual-task interleaving strategy was sensitive to changes in the difficulty of the tracking task and resulted in differences in overall task performance. To test the hypothesis that people select strategies that maximize payoff, a Cognitively Bounded (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  15
    American Pragmatism and Feminism: Fresh Opportunities for Sociological Inquiry.Nick Rumens & Mihaela Kelemen - 2010 - Contemporary Pragmatism 7 (1):129-148.
    Despite its impact on public administration, policy development, education, philosophy and politics, American pragmatism has made a relatively small impression on the social sciences. In particular, American pragmatism has seldom influenced feminism, which is remarkable given the potentially striking affinities between these two disciplines. Drawing upon the pragmatist philosophy of John Dewey and the work of feminists who support a pragmatist approach to the study of gender, this article discusses the chequered history of relations between the two disciplines. It also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  3
    Book review: Daniel K. Finn (ed.) with a foreword by John J. Dilulio, Jr, Empirical Foundations of the Common Good: What Theology Can Learn from Social Science. [REVIEW]Nick Spencer - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (3):413-416.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  9
    Essays on free will and moral responsibility.Nick Trakakis & Daniel Cohen (eds.) - 2008 - Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press.
    The problem of free will has fascinated philosophers since ancient times: Do we have free will, or at least the kind of free will that seems necessary for moral responsibility? Does determinism - the idea that everything that happens is necessitated to happen, given the past and the laws of nature - threaten the commonly held assumption that we are indeed free and morally responsible? Although these questions have been widely discussed in the past, the present volume offers a variety (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46.  7
    Observer-relative chances in anthropic reasoning?Nick Bostrom - 2000 - Erkenntnis 52 (1):93-108.
    John Leslie presents a thought experiment to show that chances are sometimes observer-relative in a paradoxical way. The pivotal assumption in his argument – a version of the weak anthropic principle – is the same as the one used to get the disturbing Doomsday argument off the ground. I show that Leslie's thought experiment trades on the sense/reference ambiguity and is fallacious. I then describe a related case where chances are observer-relative in an interesting way. But not in a paradoxical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  47. Meta-Philosophy of Religion.Nick Trakakis - 2007 - Ars Disputandi 7:1-47.
    How is the philosophical study of religion best pursued? Responses to this meta-philosophical question tend to recapitulate the analytic-Continental divide in philosophy in general. My aim is to examine the nature of this divide, particularly as it has manifested itself in the philosophy of religion. I begin with a comparison of the stylistic differences in the language of the two traditions, taking the work of Alvin Plantinga and John Caputo as exemplars of the analytic and Continental schools respectively. In order (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  8
    Could I be in a “matrix” or computer simulation?Permutation City, Vanilla Sky, John Pollock, Nick Bostrom & René Descartes - 2009 - In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
  49.  7
    Explaining supervenience: Moral and mental.Nick Zagwill - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22 (April):509-518.
    I defend the view that supervenience relations need not be explained. My view is that some supervenience relations are brute, and explanatorily ultimate. I examine an argument of Terrence Horgan and Mark Timmons. They aim to rehabilitate John Mackie’s metaphysical queerness argument. But the explanations of supervenience that Horgan and Timmons demand are semantic explanations. I criticize their attempt to explain psychophysical supervenience in this fashion. I then turn to their ‘Twin Earth’ argument against naturalist moral realism. I reconstruct their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50.  5
    Explaining Supervenience.Nick Zagwill - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:509-518.
    I defend the view that supervenience relations need not be explained. My view is that some supervenience relations are brute, and explanatorily ultimate. I examine an argument of Terrence Horgan and Mark Timmons. They aim to rehabilitate John Mackie’s metaphysical queerness argument. But the explanations of supervenience that Horgan and Timmons demand are semantic explanations. I criticize their attempt to explain psychophysical supervenience in this fashion. I then turn to their ‘Twin Earth’ argument against naturalist moral realism. I reconstruct their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000