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  1.  18
    Introduction: Engaging with Nanotechnologies – Engaging Differently? [REVIEW]Tee Rogers-Hayden, Alison Mohr & Nick Pidgeon - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):123-130.
    The idea of conducting upstream public engagement over emerging technologies has been gaining popularity in Europe and North America, with nanotechnologies seen as a test case for this. For many of its advocates, upstream engagement is about a re-conceptualisation of the science–society relationship in which a variety of ‘publics’ are brought together with stakeholders and scientists early in the Research and Development process to co-develop technological trajectories. However, the concept, aims and processes of upstream engagement remain ill-defined, are often misunderstood, (...)
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  2.  1
    Locating Scientific Citizenship: The Institutional Contexts and Cultures of Public Engagement.Nick Pidgeon, Mavis Jones, Irene Lorenzoni & Karen Bickerstaff - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):474-500.
    In this article, we explore the institutional negotiation of public engagement in matters of science and technology. We take the example of the Science in Society dialogue program initiated by the UK’s Royal Society, but set this case within the wider experience of the public engagement activities of a range of charities, corporations, governmental departments, and scientific institutions. The novelty of the analysis lies in the linking of an account of the dialogue event and its outcomes to the values, practices, (...)
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  3.  12
    Invested in Unsustainability? On the Psychosocial Patterning of Engagement in Practices.Christopher Groves, Karen Henwood, Fiona Shirani, Catherine Butler, Karen Parkhill & Nick Pidgeon - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (3):309-328.
    Understanding how and why practices may be transformed is vital for any transition towards socio-environmental sustainability. However, theorising and explaining the role of individual agency in practice change continues to present challenges. In this paper we propose that theories of practice can be usefully combined with a psychosocial framework to explain how agency is biographically patterned and how this patterning is a product of attachment relationships and emergent strategies for dealing with uncertainty. Biographical interview data from the project Energy Biographies (...)
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  4.  1
    Energy Biographies: Narrative Genres, Lifecourse Transitions, and Practice Change.Nick Pidgeon, Karen Parkhill, Catherine Butler, Fiona Shirani, Karen Henwood & Christopher Groves - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (3):483-508.
    The problem of how to make the transition to a more environmentally and socially sustainable society poses questions about how such far-reaching social change can be brought about. In recent years, lifecourse transitions have been identified by a range of researchers as opportunities for policy and other actors to intervene to change how individuals use energy, taking advantage of such disruptive transitions to encourage individuals to be reflexive toward their lifestyles and how they use the technological infrastructures on which they (...)
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  5.  8
    Incumbency, Trust and the Monsanto Effect: Stakeholder Discourses on Greenhouse Gas Removal.Emily Cox, Elspeth Spence & Nick Pidgeon - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):197-220.
    This paper explores factors shaping perceptions of Greenhouse Gas Removal amongst a range of informed stakeholders, with a particular focus on their role in future social and political systems. We find considerable ambivalence regarding the role of climate targets and incumbent interests in relation to GGR. Our results suggest that GGR is symbolic of a fundamental debate - occurring not only between separate people, but sometimes within the minds of individuals themselves - over whether technological solutions represent a pragmatic or (...)
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  6.  4
    Disturbed Earth: Conceptions of the Deep Underground in Shale Extraction Deliberations in the US and UK.Tristan Partridge, Merryn Thomas, Nick Pidgeon & Barbara Harthorn - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (6):641-663.
    Hydraulic fracturing has enabled the recovery of previously inaccessible resources and rendered new areas of the underground 'productive'. While a number of studies in the US and UK have examined public attitudes toward fracking and its various impacts, how people conceptualise the deep underground itself has received less attention. We argue that views on resources, risk and the deep underground raise important questions about how people perceive the desirability and viability of subterranean interventions. We conducted day-long deliberation workshops, facilitating discussions (...)
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  7.  6
    Valuing Nature for Wellbeing: Narratives of Socio-Ecological Change in Dynamic Intertidal Landscapes.Erin Roberts, Merryn Thomas, Nick Pidgeon & Karen Henwood - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (4):501-523.
    Contributing to the cultural ecosystem services literature, this paper draws on the in-depth place narratives of two coastal case-study sites in Wales to explore how people experience and understand landscape change in relation to their sense of place, and what this means for their wellbeing. Our place narratives reveal that participants understand coastal/intertidal landscapes as complex socio-ecological systems filled with competing legitimate claims that are difficult to manage. Such insights suggest that a focus on diachronic integrity within place narratives might (...)
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  8.  13
    What Counts as Success? Wider Implications of Achieving Planning Permission in a Low-Impact Ecovillage.Fiona Shirani, Christopher Groves, Karen Henwood, Nick Pidgeon & Erin Roberts - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):339-359.
    The need for energy system change in order to address the energy 'trilemma' of security, affordability and sustainability is well documented and requires the active involvement of individuals, families and communities who currently engage with these systems and technologies. Alongside technical developments designed to address these challenges, alternative ways of living are increasingly being envisaged by those involved in low-impact development. This article draws on data from a qualitative longitudinal study involving residents of a low-impact ecovillage in West Wales, UK, (...)
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  9.  7
    Texturing Waste: Attachment and Identity in Every-Day Consumption and Waste Practices.Gareth Thomas, Christopher Groves, Karen Henwood & Nick Pidgeon - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (6):733-755.
    Waste has often been a target of literature and policy promoting pro-environmental behaviour. However, little attention has been paid to how subjects interpret and construct waste in their daily lives. In this article we develop a synthesis of practice theory and psycho-social concepts of attachment and transitional space to explore how biographically patterned relationships and attachments to practice shape subjects' understandings of resource consumption and disposal. Deploying biographical interview data produced by the Energy Biographies Project, we illustrate how tangible, intersubjective (...)
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