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  1.  16
    Managing Authenticity: Mission Impossible?Nick Wilson - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (3):286-303.
    Despite its central focus on human freedom and individual and social emancipation, critical realism has remained surprisingly quiet on the subject of authenticity. Drawing on a review of critical realist metatheory, and a study of authentic performance in the illuminating cultural context of Early Music, this paper seeks to address this gap by exploring the significance of authenticity in today's morphogenetic society. Real authenticity is introduced as the universal human capacity to reflexively manage the inherent contradictions that arise between and (...)
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  2.  20
    Roles of Implicit Processes: Instinct, Intuition, and Personality.Ron Sun & Nick Wilson - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (1):109-134.
    The goal of this research is to explore implicit and explicit processes in shaping an individual’s characteristic behavioral patterns, that is, personality. The questions addressed are how psychological processes may be separated into implicit and explicit types, and how such a separation figures into personality. In particular, it focuses on the role of instinct and intuition in determining personality. This paper argues that personality may be fundamentally based on instincts resulting from basic human motivation, along with related processes, within a (...)
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  3. Existential Risks: New Zealand Needs a Method to Agree on a Value Framework and How to Quantify Future Lives at Risk.Matthew Boyd & Nick Wilson - 2018 - Policy Quarterly 14 (3):58-65.
    Human civilisation faces a range of existential risks, including nuclear war, runaway climate change and superintelligent artificial intelligence run amok. As we show here with calculations for the New Zealand setting, large numbers of currently living and, especially, future people are potentially threatened by existential risks. A just process for resource allocation demands that we consider future generations but also account for solidarity with the present. Here we consider the various ethical and policy issues involved and make a case for (...)
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  4.  30
    Organizing for Alternative Futures: From the Philosophy of Science to the Science of Human Flourishing.Steve Fleetwood, Nick Wilson & Lee Martin - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (3):225-232.
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  5.  7
    Aesthetics in a Persecutory Time: Introducing Aesthetic Critical Realism.Nick Wilson - 2020 - Journal of Critical Realism 19 (4):398-414.
    We are living through a time when simplistic notions of good/bad, right/wrong, and us/them, have come to dominate our encounters with each-other and our planet. Against this ‘persecutory’ backdrop,...
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  6. Book Review: Nikolas Coupland (Ed.), Sociolinguistics: Theoretical Debates. [REVIEW]Nick Wilson - 2018 - Discourse Studies 20 (1):188-190.
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  7. Roy Bhaskar with Mervyn Hartwig, The Formation of Critical Realism: A Personal Perspective. [REVIEW]Nick Wilson - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):247-254.
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  8.  33
    Strong and Smart – Towards a Pedagogy for Emancipation: Education for First Peoples. [REVIEW]Nick Wilson - 2013 - Journal of Critical Realism 12 (3):400-404.
  9.  7
    Peer Review Versus Editorial Review and Their Role in Innovative Science.Nicole Zwiren, Glenn Zuraw, Ian Young, Michael A. Woodley, Jennifer Finocchio Wolfe, Nick Wilson, Peter Weinberger, Manuel Weinberger, Christoph Wagner, Georg von Wintzigerode, Matt Vogel, Alex Villasenor, Shiloh Vermaak, Carlos A. Vega, Leo Varela, Tine van der Maas, Jennie van der Byl, Paul Vahur, Nicole Turner, Michaela Trimmel, Siro I. Trevisanato, Jack Tozer, Alison Tomlinson, Laura Thompson, David Tavares, Amhayes Tadesse, Johann Summhammer, Mike Sullivan, Carl Stryg, Christina Streli, James Stratford, Gilles St-Pierre, Karri Stokely, Joe Stokely, Reinhard Stindl, Martin Steppan, Johannes H. Sterba, Konstantin Steinhoff, Wolfgang Steinhauser, Marjorie Elizabeth Steakley, Chrislie J. Starr-Casanova, Mels Sonko, Werner F. Sommer, Daphne Anne Sole, Jildou Slofstra, John R. Skoyles, Florian Six, Sibusio Sithole, Beldeu Singh, Jolanta Siller-Matula, Kyle Shields, David Seppi, Laura Seegers, David Scott, Thomas Schwarzgruber, Clemens Sauerzopf, Jairaj Sanand, Markus Salletmaier & Sackl - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (5):359-376.
    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that (...)
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