Results for 'Nicole Lehpamer'

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  1.  45
    The moral concerns of biobank donors: the effect of non-welfare interests on willingness to donate.Raymond G. De Vries, Tom Tomlinson, H. Myra Kim, Chris D. Krenz, Kerry A. Ryan, Nicole Lehpamer & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2016 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 12 (1):1-15.
    Donors to biobanks are typically asked to give blanket consent, allowing their donation to be used in any research authorized by the biobank. This type of consent ignores the evidence that some donors have moral, religious, or cultural concerns about the future uses of their donations – concerns we call “non-welfare interests”. The nature of non-welfare interests and their effect on willingness to donate to a biobank is not well understood. In order to better undersand the influence of non-welfare interests, (...)
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  2.  19
    Differential impact of beliefs on valence and arousal.Antoinette Nicolle & Vinod Goel - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (2):263-272.
    Many cognitive accounts of emotional processing assume that emotions have representational content that can be influenced by beliefs and desires. It is generally thought that emotions also have non-cognitive, affective components, including valence and arousal. To clarify the impact of cognition on these affective components we asked participants to rate sentences along cognitive and affective dimensions. For the former case, participants rated the believability of the material. For the latter case, they provided valence and arousal ratings. Across two experiments, we (...)
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  3. Jacques Maritain: la sanctification du monde profane.Nicole Roland - 2016 - Paris: Les Éditions du Cerf.
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  4.  4
    How do Sector Level Factors Influence Trust Violations in Not-for-Profit Organizations? A Multilevel Model.Nicole Gillespie, Mattia Anesa, Morgana Lizzio-Wilson, Cassandra Chapman, Karen Healy & Matthew Hornsey - 2024 - Journal of Business Ethics 191 (2):373-398.
    The proliferation of violations within industry sectors (e.g., banking, doping in sport, abuse in religious organizations) highlights how trust violations can thrive in particular sectors. However, scant research examines how macro institutional factors influence micro level trustworthy conduct. To shed light on how sectoral features may influence trust violations in organizations, we adopt a multilevel perspective to investigate the perceived causes of trust violations within the not-for-profit (NFP) sector, a sector that has witnessed a number of high-profile trust breaches. Drawing (...)
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  5.  9
    Le laboratoire mathématique de Nicolas de Cues.Jean-Marie Nicolle - 2020 - Paris: Beauchesne.
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  6.  7
    Essais de morale.Pierre Nicole - 1999 - Paris: Presses universitaires de France. Edited by Laurent Thirouin.
    Etrange personnage que Pierre Nicole. La postérité l'a rangé parmi les deuxièmes rôles de Port-Royal, une sorte de permanent du parti janséniste. Il a secondé le grand Arnauld, instruit Racine dans les Petites Ecoles, aidé Pascal et traduit en latin ses Provinciales. Fidèle entre les fidèles, et en même temps mal à l'aise dans cette atmosphère de fronde et de résistance que représente le milieu de Port-Royal, au sein de la France du XVII e siècle, ce latiniste timoré ne (...)
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  7.  48
    Attitudes, beliefs, and prevalence of dumpster diving as a means to obtain food by Midwestern, low-income, urban dwellers.Nicole Eikenberry & Chery Smith - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):187-202.
    “Dumpster diving” is a term generally used for obtaining items, in this case food for consumption, from dumpsters. This study evaluates the prevalence of dumpster diving in two low-income urban communities in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Additionally, attitudes and beliefs of adults who engage in this behavior are reported. Surveys (n=396) were used to collect data including individual dumpster diving behavior, food security, health, and demographic data. Nearly one-fifth of those surveyed had used dumpster diving as a means to obtain food. Focus (...)
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  8. One Too Many: Hermeneutical Excess as Hermeneutical Injustice.Nicole Dular - 2023 - Hypatia 38 (2):423-438.
    Hermeneutical injustice, as a species of epistemic injustice, is when members of marginalized groups are unable to make their experiences communicatively intelligible due to a deficiency in collective hermeneutical resources, where this deficiency is traditionally interpreted as a lack of concepts. Against this understanding, this paper argues that even if adequate concepts that describe marginalized groups’ experiences are available within the collective hermeneutical resources, hermeneutical injustice can persist. This paper offers an analysis of how this can happen by introducing the (...)
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  9.  3
    Sei wie das Veilchen im Moose--: Aspekte feministischer Ethik.Nicole Kramer (ed.) - 1994 - Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag.
  10. The dignity of mankind : Edward Tyson's anatomy of a pygmie and the ape-man boundary.Nicole Mennell - 2018 - In Sarah Bezan & James Tink (eds.), Seeing animals after Derrida. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  11.  6
    Le langage de l'émotion: variations linguistiques et culturelles.Nicole Tersis & Pascal Boyeldieu (eds.) - 2017 - Leuven: Peeters.
    L'expression de nos émotions est-elle la même d'une langue à l'autre? À partir d'un large éventail de langues présentes continents, cet ouvrage témoigne de la grande variété des modalités d'expression des émotions, en fonction des codes culturels de différentes sociétés à tradition écrite ou orale. Les situations envisagées ici vont de la communication orale spontanée dans des contextes divers aux récits en passant par la création théâtrale et la poésie. S'appuyant sur ces sources multiples, l'ouvrage expose les procédés lexicaux grammaticaux, (...)
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  12.  33
    Animal Capital: Rendering Life in Biopolitical Times.Nicole Shukin - 2009 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Nicole Shukin pursues a resolutely materialist engagement with the "question of the animal," challenging the philosophical idealism that has dogged the question by tracing how the politics of capital and of animal life impinge on one ...
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  13. The Harms of the Internalized Oppression Worry.Nicole Dular & Madeline Ward - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    In this paper, we locate a general rhetorical strategy employed in theoretical discourse wherein philosophers argue from the mere existence of internalized oppression to some kind of epistemic, moral, political, or cognitive deficiency of oppressed people. We argue that this strategy has harmful consequences for oppressed people, breaking down our analysis in terms of individual and structural harms within both epistemic and moral domains. These harms include attempting to undermine the self-trust of oppressed people, reinforcing unjust epistemic power hierarchies, undermining (...)
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  14. Mansplaining as Epistemic Injustice.Nicole Dular - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1).
    “Mansplaining” is by now part of the common cultural vernacular. Yet, academic analyses of it—specifically, philosophical ones—are missing. This paper sets out to address just that problem. Analyzed through a lens of epistemic injustice, the focus of the analysis concerns both what it is, and what its harms are. I argue it is a form of epistemic injustice distinct from testimonial injustice wherein there is a dysfunctional subversion of the epistemic roles of hearer and speaker in a testimonial exchange. As (...)
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  15.  9
    A survey of the variability of DNA banks worldwide.Nicole Palmour - 2003 - In Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.), Populations and genetics: legal and socio-ethical perspectives. Boston: Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 123--140.
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  16.  11
    Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place.Nicole Porter - 2016 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    Landscape and brandingexplores the way landscape is conceptualised, conceived, represented and designed by professionals in a brand-driven age. Landscape - incorporating tangible physical space as well as intangible concepts, narratives, images, and experiences of place - is constructed by a number of creative industries. This book tests the hypothesis that place branding, a powerful marketing and management practice, increasingly blurs the distinction between the promotionof landscape and its production in design terms. Place branding involves the strategic and systematic composition of (...)
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  17.  67
    Real and Imagined Body Movement Primes Metaphor Comprehension.Nicole L. Wilson & Raymond W. Gibbs - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (4):721-731.
    We demonstrate in two experiments that real and imagined body movements appropriate to metaphorical phrases facilitate people's immediate comprehension of these phrases. Participants first learned to make different body movements given specific cues. In two reading time studies, people were faster to understand a metaphorical phrase, such as push the argument, when they had previously just made an appropriate body action (e.g., a push movement) (Experiment 1), or imagined making a specific body movement (Experiment 2), than when they first made (...)
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  18. On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility.Nicole A. Vincent - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):77-98.
    Various authors debate the question of whether neuroscience is relevant to criminal responsibility. However, a plethora of different techniques and technologies, each with their own abilities and drawbacks, lurks beneath the label “neuroscience”; and in criminal law responsibility is not a single, unitary and generic concept, but it is rather a syndrome of at least six different concepts. Consequently, there are at least six different responsibility questions that the criminal law asks—at least one for each responsibility concept—and, I will suggest, (...)
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  19.  46
    Power in Deliberative Democracy: Norms, Forums, and Systems.Nicole Curato, Marit Hammond & John B. Min - 2018 - Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. Edited by Marit Hammond & John B. Min.
    Deliberative democracy is an embattled political project. It is accused of political naiveté for it only talks about power without taking power. Others, meanwhile, take issue with deliberative democracy’s dominance in the field of democratic theory and practice. An industry of consultants, facilitators, and experts of deliberative forums has grown over the past decades, suggesting that the field has benefited from a broken political system. This book is inspired by these accusations. It argues that deliberative democracy’s tense relationship with power (...)
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  20. Enhancing Responsibility.Nicole Vincent - 2013 - In Nicole A. Vincent (ed.), Neuroscience and Legal Responsibility. Oup Usa. pp. 305-333.
  21. The misuse of Kant in the debate about a market for human body parts.Nicole Gerrand - 1999 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):59–67.
    Passages from the writings of Immanuel Kant concerning how a person should treat her body are often cited in the present‐day debate about a market for human body parts. In this paper, I demonstrate that this has been a misuse of Kant because unlike those who cite him, Kant was not primarily concerned with prohibiting the sale of body parts. In the first section, I argue that once these particular passages are understood against the background of Kant’s moral philosophy, they (...)
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  22.  23
    Answering for the past: Exploring the conditions of answerability over time.Nicole Ramsoomair - 2021 - Dialogue 60 (2):359-377.
    RÉSUMÉOn pense souvent qu'un changement significatif de notre caractère évaluatif pourrait saper notre responsabilité par rapport à nos méfaits passés. Dans cet article, j'explore cette intuition en analysant les concepts de responsabilité et de l'obligation de rendre des comptes, tels que présentés par Angela Smith. J'introduis une distinction entre « modification » et « remplacement » pour définir les limites de la responsabilité au fil du temps. Ces limites sont ensuite précisées en s'inspirant des travaux de Delia Graff sur les (...)
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  23.  21
    Neuroscience and Legal Responsibility.Nicole A. Vincent (ed.) - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Adopting a broadly compatibilist approach, this volume's authors argue that the behavioral and mind sciences do not threaten the moral foundations of legal responsibility. Rather, these sciences provide fresh insight into human agency and updated criteria as well as powerful diagnostic and intervention tools for assessing and altering minds.
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  24. Amidst the ASF Outbreak: The Job Burnout and Employee Performance in the Feed Industry.Nicole P. Francisco, Waren G. Mendoza, Christine Mae S. Boquiren, Michelle Anne Vivien De Jesus, Samantha Nicole N. Dilag, Mary Angeli Z. Menor, Zyresse Katrine P. Jose & Jhoselle Tus - 2023 - Psychology and Education: A Multidisciplinary Journal 9 (1):595-602.
    This study aims to investigate the relationship between job burnout and employee performance in the feed industry during the ASF outbreak. Further, the researchers employed a descriptive-correlational research design in order to analyze the acquired data and produce pertinent findings. Thus, the researchers gathered data from one hundred two (102) feed industry employees. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ) were employed to ascertain the extent of job burnout experienced by the respondents and evaluate employee performance, (...)
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  25. Jointly structuring triadic spaces of meaning and action: book sharing from 3 months on.Nicole Rossmanith, Alan Costall, Andreas F. Reichelt, Beatriz López & Vasudevi Reddy - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  26.  31
    Roots and Branches: Reflections on the Origin Points of the Anthropology of Consciousness.Nicole Torres - 2021 - Anthropology of Consciousness 32 (2):124-128.
    Anthropology of Consciousness, Volume 32, Issue 2, Page 124-128, Autumn 2021.
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  27.  14
    Nicole Zaaroura interviewed by Pat Naldi.Nicole Zaaroura - 2015 - Philosophy of Photography 6 (1):113-128.
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  28.  17
    Roots and Branches: Reflections on the Origin Points of the Anthropology of Consciousness.Nicole Torres - 2021 - Anthropology of Consciousness 32 (2):124-128.
    Anthropology of Consciousness, Volume 32, Issue 2, Page 124-128, Autumn 2021.
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  29. Moral Testimony under Oppression.Nicole Dular - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (2):212-236.
    ​The traditional datum concerning moral testimony is that it is (epistemically or morally) problematic--or at least more problematic--than non-moral testimony. More recently, some have sought to analyze the issue of moral testimony within a narrower lens: instead of questioning whether moral testimony on the whole is (more) problematic or not, they have instead focused on possible conditions under which moral deference would be legitimate or forbidden. In this paper, I consider two such features: that of uncertainty and a belief in (...)
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  30. Standpoint Moral Epistemology: The Epistemic Advantage Thesis.Nicole Dular - 2023 - Philosophical Studies 181.
    One of standpoint theory’s main claims is the thesis of epistemic advantage, which holds that marginalized agents have epistemic advantages due to their social disadvantage as marginalized. The epistemic advantage thesis has been argued to be true with respect to knowledge about particular dominant ideologies like classism and sexism, as well as knowledge within fields as diverse as sociology and economics. However, it has yet to be analyzed with respect to ethics. This paper sets out to complete this task. Here, (...)
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  31. The notion of gift-giving and organ donation.Nicole Gerrand - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (2):127–150.
    ABSTRACTThe analogy between gift‐giving and organ donation was first suggested at the beginning of the transplantation era, when policy makers and legislators were promoting voluntary organ donation as the preferred procurement procedure. It was believed that the practice of gift‐giving had some features which were also thought to be necessary to ensure that an organ procurement procedure would be morally acceptable, namely voluntarism and altruism. Twenty‐five years later, the analogy between gift‐giving and organ donation is still being made in the (...)
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  32.  86
    Restoring Responsibility: Promoting Justice, Therapy and Reform Through Direct Brain Interventions.Nicole A. Vincent - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):21-42.
    Direct brain intervention based mental capacity restoration techniques-for instance, psycho-active drugs-are sometimes used in criminal cases to promote the aims of justice. For instance, they might be used to restore a person's competence to stand trial in order to assess the degree of their responsibility for what they did, or to restore their competence for punishment so that we can hold them responsible for it. Some also suggest that such interventions might be used for therapy or reform in criminal legal (...)
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  33.  33
    Nicole Zaaroura interviewed by Pat Naldi.Nicole Zaaroura - 2015 - Philosophy of Photography 6 (1):115-130.
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  34.  48
    Epistemic Reasons, Transparency, and Evolutionary Debunking.Nicole Dular & Nikki Fortier - 2021 - Philosophia 49 (4):1455-1473.
    Recently, evidentialists have argued that only they can explain transparency--the psychological phenomena wherein the question of doxastic deliberation of whether to believe p immediately gives way to the question of whether p--and thus that pragmatism about epistemic reasons is false. In this paper, we provide a defense of pragmatism. We depart from previous defenses of pragmatism which argue against the evidentialist explanation of transparency or the fact of transparency itself, by instead arguing that the pragmatist can provide a sound explanation (...)
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  35. Logical Particularism.Nicole Wyatt & Gillman Payette - 2018 - In Jeremy Wyatt, Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen & Nathan Kellen (eds.), Pluralisms in Truth and Logic. Cham, Switzerland and Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 277-299.
    Logics—that is to say logical systems—are generally conceived of as describing the logical forms of arguments as well as endorsing cer- tain principles or rules of inference specified in terms of these forms. From this perspective, a correct logic is a system which captures only (and perhaps all) of the correct principles, and good—i.e. logical— reasoning is reasoning which at the level of logical form conforms to the principles of a correct logic. In contrast, as logical particularists we reject the (...)
     
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  36. How Do Logics Explain?Nicole Wyatt & Gillman Payette - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):157-167.
    Anti-exceptionalists about logic maintain that it is continuous with the empirical sciences. Taking anti-exceptionalism for granted, we argue that traditional approaches to explanation are inadequate in the case of logic. We argue that Andrea Woody's functional analysis of explanation is a better fit with logical practice and accounts better for the explanatory role of logical theories.
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  37. Against logical generalism.Nicole Wyatt & Gillman Payette - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 20):4813-4830.
    The orthodox view of logic takes for granted the central importance of logical principles. Logic, and thus logical reasoning, is to be understood as a system of rules or principles with universal application. Let us call this orthodox view logical generalism. In this paper we argue that logical generalism, whether monist or pluralist, is wrong. We then outline an account of logical consequence in the absence of general logical principles, which we call logical particularism.
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  38.  31
    Social class disparities in health and education: Reducing inequality by applying a sociocultural self model of behavior.Nicole M. Stephens, Hazel Rose Markus & Stephanie A. Fryberg - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (4):723-744.
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  39. Responsibility: distinguishing virtue from capacity.Nicole A. Vincent - 2009 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):111-26.
    Garrath Williams claims that truly responsible people must possess a “capacity … to respond [appropriately] to normative demands” (2008:462). However, there are people whom we would normally praise for their responsibility despite the fact that they do not yet possess such a capacity (e.g. consistently well-behaved young children), and others who have such capacity but who are still patently irresponsible (e.g. some badly-behaved adults). Thus, I argue that to qualify for the accolade “a responsible person” one need not possess such (...)
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  40.  11
    Racial Myths and Regulatory Responsibility.Nicolle K. Strand - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (2):231-240.
    Calls to abolish race as a proxy for biology or genetics in clinical care have reached a fever pitch in the latter half of 2020, including articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, and urgent letters from prominent Senators.
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  41.  13
    The Notion of Gift‐Giving and Organ Donation.Nicole Gerrand - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (2):127-150.
    The analogy between gift‐giving and organ donation was first suggested at the beginning of the transplantation era, when policy makers and legislators were promoting voluntary organ donation as the preferred procurement procedure. It was believed that the practice of gift‐giving had some features which were also thought to be necessary to ensure that an organ procurement procedure would be morally acceptable, namely voluntarism and altruism. Twenty‐five years later, the analogy between gift‐giving and organ donation is still being made in the (...)
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  42. The Pragmatics of Empty Names.Nicole Wyatt - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (4):663-681.
    Fred Adams and collaborators advocate a view on which empty-name sentences semantically encode incomplete propositions, but which can be used to conversationally implicate descriptive propositions. This account has come under criticism recently from Marga Reimer and Anthony Everett. Reimer correctly observes that their account does not pass a natural test for conversational implicatures, namely, that an explanation of our intuitions in terms of implicature should be such that we upon hearing it recognize it to be roughly correct. Everett argues that (...)
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  43.  25
    Ethics Consultation in Surgical Specialties.Nicole A. Meredyth, Joseph J. Fins & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2021 - HEC Forum 34 (1):89-102.
    Multiple studies have been performed to identify the most common ethical dilemmas encountered by ethics consultation services. However, limited data exists comparing the content of ethics consultations requested by specific hospital specialties. It remains unclear whether the scope of ethical dilemmas prompting an ethics consultation differ between specialties and if there are types of ethics consultations that are more or less frequently called based on the specialty initiating the ethics consult. This study retrospectively assessed the incidence and content of ethics (...)
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  44. Failing to do things with words.Nicole Wyatt - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):135-142.
    It has become standard for feminist philosophers of language to analyze Catherine MacKinnon's claim in terms of speech act theory. Backed by the Austinian observation that speech can do things and the legal claim that pornography is speech, the claim is that the speech acts performed by means of pornography silence women. This turns upon the notion of illocutionary silencing, or disablement. In this paper I observe that the focus by feminist philosophers of language on the failure to achieve uptake (...)
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  45. Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments.Nicole A. Vincent - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49.
    Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.
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  46. What do you mean I should take responsibility for my own ill health.Nicole A. Vincent - 2009 - Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):39-51.
    Luck egalitarians think that considerations of responsibility can excuse departures from strict equality. However critics argue that allowing responsibility to play this role has objectionably harsh consequences. Luck egalitarians usually respond either by explaining why that harshness is not excessive, or by identifying allegedly legitimate exclusions from the default responsibility-tracking rule to tone down that harshness. And in response, critics respectively deny that this harshness is not excessive, or they argue that those exclusions would be ineffective or lacking in justification. (...)
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  47.  33
    H. J. Eysenck in Fagin’s kitchen: the return to biological theory in 20th-century criminology.Nicole Hahn Rafter - 2006 - History of the Human Sciences 19 (4):37-56.
    In 1964, the British psychologist Hans Jürgen Eysenck published Crime and Personality, the book that set forth his theory of the criminal as a psychopathic poor conditioner. Crime and Personality went through three editions, and even those who vehemently rejected the theory acknowledged it as the most highly articulated and influential biological explanation of crime of its time. Yet today Eysenck’s name is fading from criminological memory - and none too soon, in the opinion of critics who continue to anathematize (...)
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  48.  15
    Research ethics in a changing social sciences landscape.Nicole Brown - 2023 - Research Ethics 19 (2):157-165.
    The role of research ethics committees, and research ethics issues more broadly are often not viewed in the context of the development of scientific methods and the academic community. This topic piece seeks to redress this gap. I begin with a brief outline of the changes we experience within the social sciences before exploring in more detail their impact on research ethics and the practices of research ethics committees. I conclude with recommendations for how the existing research ethics processes may (...)
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  49. What are Beall and Restall pluralists about?Nicole Wyatt - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):409 – 420.
    In this paper I argue that Beall and Restall's claim that there is one true logic of metaphysical modality is incompatible with the formulation of logical pluralism that they give. I investigate various ways of reconciling their pluralism with this claim, but conclude that none of the options can be made to work.
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  50.  72
    What is a Computer Simulation? A Review of a Passionate Debate.Nicole J. Saam - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (2):293-309.
    Where should computer simulations be located on the ‘usual methodological map’ which distinguishes experiment from theory? Specifically, do simulations ultimately qualify as experiments or as thought experiments? Ever since Galison raised that question, a passionate debate has developed, pushing many issues to the forefront of discussions concerning the epistemology and methodology of computer simulation. This review article illuminates the positions in that debate, evaluates the discourse and gives an outlook on questions that have not yet been addressed.
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