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  1.  19
    Bataille and the Birth of the Subject: Out of the Laughter of the Socius.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (2):73-88.
    This article examines how Georges Bataille, one of the celebrated precursors of the postmodern death of a linguistic subject, is also a Nietzschean, pre-Freudian thinker who offers us an account of the birth of an affective subject. If critics still tend to recuperate Bataille within a “metaphysics of the subject,” the present article shows that the central concept of his thought needs to be reconsidered in the light of his debt to Pierre Janet’s “psychology of the socius,” an interpersonal psychology (...)
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  2.  15
    Violence and the Mimetic Unconscious : The Cathartic Hypothesis: Aristotle, Freud, Girard.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2018 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 25 (1):159-191.
    It might be left to the specialist philosophers to act as spokesmen and mediators in this matter, once they have largely succeeded in reshaping the original relationship of mutual aloofness and suspicion which obtains between the disciplines of philosophy, physiology, and medicine into the most amicable and fruitful exchange.What is the relation between violence and the unconscious in a world increasingly dominated by representations that are fictional yet might turn out to have effects that are all too real? Does an (...)
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  3.  5
    Violence and the Mimetic Unconscious : The Contagious Hypothesis: Plato, Affect, Mirror Neurons.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):123-159.
    To Bill Johnsen, mimetic theorist and innovative editor.Have you not observed that imitations, if continued from youth far into life, settle down into habits and second nature in the body, the speech and the thought?Yes, we have observed the powers of mimesis. And if we reload Socrates's untimely observation for our contemporary, hypermimetic times, we cannot help but wonder yet again: What is the relation between violence, imitation, and the unconscious in a world increasingly dominated by virtual representations of violence, (...)
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  4.  7
    Bataille and the Homology of Heterology.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2018 - Theory, Culture and Society 35 (4-5):41-68.
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  5.  10
    Dueling to the End/Ending "The Duel": Girard Avec Conrad.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2015 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 22:153-184.
    A philosopher who is warlike also challenges problems to a duel.There!—there! Don’t be so quick in flourishing the sword. It doesn’t pay in the long run.René Girard’s Achever Clausewitz is his latest, most incisive and penetrating account of the contagious dynamic of mimetic violence.1 It is also a bold attempt to finish Carl von Clausewitz’s classic Vom Kriege in a sense that is at least double.2 On the one hand, Girard sets out to finish Clausewitz’s insights into the dynamic of (...)
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  6.  4
    The Critic as Mime: Wilde's Theoretical Performance.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2017 - Symploke 26 (1-2):307.
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  7. The Phantom of the Ego: Modernism and the Mimetic Unconscious.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2013 - Michigan State University Press.
    _The Phantom of the Ego _is the first comparative study that shows how the modernist account of the unconscious anticipates contemporary discoveries about the importance of mimesis in the formation of subjectivity. Rather than beginning with Sigmund Freud as the father of modernism, Nidesh Lawtoo starts with Friedrich Nietzsche’s antimetaphysical diagnostic of the ego, his realization that mimetic reflexes—from sympathy to hypnosis, to contagion, to crowd behavior—move the soul, and his insistence that psychology informs philosophical reflection. Through a transdisciplinary, comparative (...)
     
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