Results for 'Nietzsche’s Contexts'

996 found
Order:
  1. Carnap's Contexts : Comte, Heidegger, Nietzsche.Barry Allen - 2003 - In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.
  2.  66
    Nietzsche's Thumbscrew: Honesty as Virtue and Value Standard.Aaron Harper - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):367.
    Much has been made of the apparent tensions in Nietzsche’s ethical and metaethical views. In this essay I examine a kind of value standard available to Nietzsche that is present in his work. I offer an interpretation of honesty as both a Nietzschean virtue and a means of ethical assessment. Despite Nietzsche’s well-known criticisms of truth, he upholds honesty as the only remaining virtue of his free spirits. Honesty has been treated in the literature primarily in the (...) of truth or life affirmation, but I argue that we should instead recognize honesty as a virtue within the context of valuing. I defend honesty as a distinct kind of truthfulness and sincerity involving what I call confrontation. The seeds of Nietzsche’s mature view are first evident in his work on tragedy, then developed further in Zarathustra, ultimately revealing a constraint on valuing that is essential to Nietzsche’s broader normative projects. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Nietzsche’s Polychrome Exemplarism.Mark Alfano - 2018 - Ethics and Politics 2:45-64.
    In this paper, I develop an account of Nietzschean exemplarism. Drawing on my previous work, I argue that an agent’s instincts and other drives constitute her psychological type. In this framework, a drive counts as a virtue to the extent that it is well-calibrated with the rest of the agent’s psychic economy and meets with sentiments of approbation from the agent’s community. Different virtues are fitting for different types, and different types elicit different discrete emotions in people with fine-tuned affective (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language.CLAUDIA CRAWFORD - 1988 - De Gruyter.
    The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language is concerned with the years 1865 through Winter/Spring 1870-71. Four texts of Nietzsche's, "Vom Ursprung der Sprache", "Zur Teleologie", "Zu Schopenhauer", and "Anschauung Notes", are translated into English and interpreted from the perspective of Nietzsche's developing theory of language. An examination of the major influences of Schopenhauer, Kant, Eduard von Hartmann, and Frederick A. Lange are pursued. ;Theory, in this work, does not assume that it is possible to take a position of authority (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. An Interpretation of Nietzsche's "on the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life".Anthony K. Jensen - 2016 - Routledge.
    With his _An Interpretation of Nietzsche’s "On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life_", Anthony K. Jensen shows how 'timely' Nietzsche’s second "Untimely Meditation" really is. This comprehensive and insightful study contextualizes and analyzes a wide range of Nietzsche’s earlier thoughts about history: teleology, typology, psychology, memory, classical philology, Hegelianism, and the role historiography plays in modern culture. _On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life_ is shown to be a ‘timely’ work, too, insofar as (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Nietzsche's the Gay Science: An Introduction.Michael Ure - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche's The Gay Science is a deeply personal book, yet also an important work of philosophy. Nietzsche conceives it as a philosophical autobiography, a record of his own self-transformation. In beautifully composed aphorisms he communicates his central experience of overcoming pessimism and recovering the capacity to affirm joyfully the tragedy of life. On the basis of his experiments in living, Nietzsche articulates his most famous philosophical concepts and images: the death of God, the exercise of eternal recurrence, and the ideal (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  3
    Nietzsche’s Idea of Eternal Recurrence and the Notions of Reincarnation in Onyewuenyi and Majeed.Anthony Chimankpam Ojimba & Ada Agada - 2020 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 9 (2):35-56.
    This paper examines Nietzsche’s idea of eternal recurrence and the notions of reincarnation in Onyewuenyi and Majeed with a view to showing how convergence and divergence of thought in the Nietzschean, Onyewuenyean and Majeedean philosophy contexts can inform cross-cultural philosophizing. Nietzsche’s idea of eternal recurrence represents his deep thought, which claims that every aspect of life returns innumerable times, in an identical fashion. On the other hand, Onyewuenyi posits that reincarnation is un-African as he conceives it as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Mask of Enlightenment: Nietzsche’s Zarathustra, Second Edition.Stanley Rosen - 2004 - Yale University Press.
    This landmark study is a detailed textual and thematic analysis of one of Nietzsche’s most important but least understood works. Stanley Rosen argues that in _Zarathustra _Nietzsche_ _lays the groundwork for philosophical and political revolution, proposing a change in humanity’s condition that would be achieved by eliminating the decadent existing race and breeding a new race to take its place. Rosen discusses Nietzsche’s systematically duplicitous rhetoric of esoteric messages in _Zarathustra, _and he places the book in the (...) of Greek, Christian, Enlightenment, and postmodernist thought. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1881/1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Daybreak marks the arrival of Nietzsche's 'mature' philosophy and is indispensable for an understanding of his critique of morality and 'revaluation of all values'. This volume presents the distinguished translation by R. J. Hollingdale, with a new introduction that argues for a dramatic change in Nietzsche's views from Human, All Too Human to Daybreak, and shows how this change, in turn, presages the main themes of Nietzsche's later and better-known works such as On the Genealogy of Morality. The main themes (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  10.  4
    ‘An Old Carriage with New Horses’: Nietzsche’s Critique of Democracy.Hugo Drochon - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (8):1055-1068.
    SUMMARYDebates about Nietzsche's political thought today revolve around his role in contemporary democratic theory: is he a thinker to be mined for stimulating resources in view of refounding democratic legitimacy on a radicalised, postmodern and agonistic footing, or is he the modern arch-critic of democracy budding democrats must hone their arguments against? Moving away from this dichotomy, this article asks first and foremost what democracy meant for Nietzsche in late nineteenth-century Germany, and on that basis what we might learn from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  16
    On the Institution of the Moral Subject: On the Commander and the Commanded in Nietzsche's Discussion of Law.Peter Bornedal - 2013 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 54 (128):439-457.
    O artigo discute como Nietzsche compreende a instituição da lei e da moral em distinção a Kant e à tradição cristã. Ele argumenta que Nietzsche é, em grande medida, inspirado pela mudança de paradigma em direção a um pensamento biológico evolutivo, introduzido por diversos de seus colegas ao final do século XIX, entre os quais F. A. Lange, que vê esta mudança como uma sóbria alternativa científico-materialista a Kant. Em Nietzsche, a imperativa moral kantiana é substituída pela noção de uma (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Nietzsche: Writings From the Early Notebooks.Raymond Geuss, Alexander Nehamas & Ladislaus Löb (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche's unpublished notes are extraordinary in both volume and interest, and indispensable to a full understanding of his lifelong engagement with the fundamental questions of philosophy. This volume includes an extensive selection of the notes he kept during the early years of his career. They address the philosophy of Schopenhauer, the nature of tragedy, the relationship of language to music, the importance of Classical Greek culture for modern life, and the value of the unfettered pursuit of truth and knowledge which (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  67
    Nietzsche, Proust, and Will-to-Ignorance.Joshua Landy - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):1-23.
    “The will to truth,” says Nietzsche, “is merely a form of the will to illusion”; it’s not the opposite of “the will to ignorance, to the uncertain, to the untrue,” but instead “its refinement.” What can this mean? How could a quest for knowledge ever serve a desire to remain in the dark? I answer this question by means of an example in Proust, whose protagonist expends huge quantities of energy apparently trying to find out whether his love partner is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  73
    Nietzsche’s ‘Anti-Naturalism’ in ‘The Four Great Errors’.David Emmanuel Rowe - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):256 - 276.
    This paper is primarily a response to ?analytically-minded? philosophers, such as Maudemarie Clark and Brian Leiter, who push for a ?naturalistic? interpretation of Nietzsche. In particular, this paper will consider Leiter?s (2007) discussion of Nietzsche?s chapter in Twilight of the Idols, ?The Four Great Errors?, and argue that Leiter has misinterpreted this chapter in at least four ways. I provide a superior interpretation of this chapter, which argues that Nietzsche is using a transcendental style of argument to argue against a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  4
    Eugen Dühring: Ein handschriftliches „Nietzsche“-Stichwort von 1896.Hans-Christoph Rauh - 2018 - Nietzsche Studien Gesamtregister Bände 1-20 47 (1):367-378.
    Eugen Dühring - A handwritten note on ‘Nietzsche’ from 1896. This paper contains the first publication of a yet unknown manuscript, which Eugen Dühring wrote in response to his reading of - in part falsified and decontextualized - passages about him in Koegel’s edition of Nietzsche’s late notes. Dühring’s note reveals blatant anti-Semitism and he vituperates Nietzsche as a ‘lawyer’ of Jews. The note is subsequently used in later publications of Dühring and his followers. The paper continues to reconstruct (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  33
    Nietzsche on Humility and Modesty.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Justin Steinberg (ed.), Humility: A History. Oxford University Press.
    Beginning with the Untimely Meditations (1873) and continuing until his final writings of 1888-9, Nietzsche refers to humility (Demuth or a cognate) in fifty-two passages and to modesty (Bescheidenheit or a cognate) in one hundred and four passages, yet there are only four passages that refer to both terms. Moreover, perhaps surprisingly, he often speaks positively of modesty, especially in epistemic contexts. These curious facts might be expected to lead scholars to explore what Nietzsche thinks of humility and modesty, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Nietzsche’s Thirst For India: Schopenhauerian, Brahmanist, and Buddhist Accents In Reflections on Truth, the Ascetic Ideal, and the Eternal Return.S. M. Amadae - 2004 - Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Nietzsche: Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality.Maudemarie Clark & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Daybreak marks the arrival of Nietzsche's 'mature' philosophy and is indispensable for an understanding of his critique of morality and 'revaluation of all values'. This volume presents the distinguished translation by R. J. Hollingdale, with a new introduction that argues for a dramatic change in Nietzsche's views from Human, All Too Human to Daybreak, and shows how this change, in turn, presages the main themes of Nietzsche's later and better-known works such as On the Genealogy of Morality. The main themes (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas.Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    If you were looking for a philosopher likely to appeal to Americans, Friedrich Nietzsche would be far from your first choice. After all, in his blazing career, Nietzsche took aim at nearly all the foundations of modern American life: Christian morality, the Enlightenment faith in reason, and the idea of human equality. Despite that, for more than a century Nietzsche has been a hugely popular—and surprisingly influential—figure in American thought and culture. In _American Nietzsche_, Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen delves deeply into Nietzsche's (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  60
    Attitudes to Suffering: Parfit and Nietzsche.Christopher Janaway - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (1-2):66-95.
    In On What Matters, Derek Parfit argues that Nietzsche does not disagree with central normative beliefs that ‘we’ hold. Such disagreement would threaten Parfit’s claim that normative beliefs are known by intuition. However, Nietzsche defends a conception of well-being that challenges Parfit’s normative claim that suffering is bad in itself for the sufferer. Nietzsche recognizes the phenomenon of ‘growth through suffering’ as essential to well-being. Hence, removal of all suffering would lead to diminished well-being. Parfit claims that if Nietzsche understood (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  49
    Nietzsche's Educational Legacy Revisited. Aresponse to Professor Rosenow. [REVIEW]Michael Peters - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2-3):203-209.
    The article presents the author's response to Eliyahu Rosenow's review of "Nietzsche's Legacy for Education: Past and Present Values." Rosenow begins his review by relating our collection to Anglo-American philosophy of education and the twin claims made for its uniqueness by the editors: the collection comprises work by a group of scholars from three different locations working from original texts, linking "Nietzsch's "oeuvre" to contemporary scholarship and particularly the work of the French poststructuralists." I do not think that Rosenow makes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  22
    Nietzsche’s Metaphysics of Play.Eugen Fink, Catherine Homan & Zachary Hamm - 2019 - Philosophy Today 63 (1):21-33.
    This lecture from 1946 presents Eugen Fink’s interpretation of Nietzsche’s metaphysics. Fink’s aim here is twofold: to work against the trend of psychologistic interpretations of Nietzsche’s work and to perform the philosophical interpretation of Nietzsche he finds lacking in his predecessors. Fink contends that play is the central intuition of Nietzsche’s philosophy, specifically in his rejection of Western metaphysics’ insistence on being and presence. Drawing instead from Heraclitus, Nietzsche argues for an ontology of becoming characterized by the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  41
    Nietzsche's Modernism: Dialectics and Genealogy.Adam Rosen-Carole - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (2-3):161-225.
    “‘[C]onscience,’” Nietzsche suggests early in Essay Two of On the Genealogy of Morals, “has a long history and variety of forms behind it”. Glossing over the explicit equivocity and irony of such statements, most commentators presume that the primary ambition of GM is to reconstruct the emergence and in so doing denaturalize and denounce the reign of conscience, which is treated as equivalent to both bad conscience and slave morality. Such presumption has obscured the central claims, operations, and stakes of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  15
    Nietzsche’s Analysis of Causality.George J. Stack - 1982 - Idealistic Studies 12 (3):260-275.
    Overshadowed by his critiques of traditional morality and Christianity, many of Nietzsche’s insightful philosophical analyses have often been neglected. Although Nietzsche as philosopher has, at long last, been recognized, his epistemological reflections are a fairly recent discovery in Anglo-American philosophy. This is curious because some of the earliest German interpreters of his thought had emphasized the link between his metaphysical views and his analyses of human knowledge. At the beginning of this century, Eisler and Rittelmeyer discussed the importance of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  44
    After Montinari: On Nietzsche Philology.Werner Stegmaier & Lisa Marie Anderson - 2009 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):5-19.
    Nietzsche wrote in Human, All Too Human: "The worst readers are those who behave like plundering troops: they take away a few things they can use, dirty and confound the remainder, and revile the whole" . Nonetheless, Nietzsche's interpreters have, to a large extent and to this day, proceeded in just this way. Instead, Nietzsche demanded that one read his aphorisms and aphorism books slowly and thoroughly within the contexts in which he placed them and, further, that one always (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  16
    A Dialogue with Nietzsche: Blumenberg and Löwith on History and Progress.Zeynep Talay - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (3):376-381.
    While discussions of the debate between Karl Löwith and Hans Blumenberg over ‘secularisation’ focus primarily on the methodological utility of the concept, the difference between them was also one of the philosophical commitments and substantive claims about modernity. This difference is not always obvious. One way of bringing it out is to address the different contexts in which they produced their most famous statements about secularisation. But another, and one that will be pursued here, is to consider the critical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Nietzsche's Corps/E: Aesthetics, Politics, Prophecy, or, the Spectacular Technoculture of Everyday Life. [REVIEW]Bruce Krajewski - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):178-181.
    Geoff Waite's book is crucial for coming to terms with almost all the important issues of the day and of the future, as the subtitle and length might suggest. Waite is provocative, learned, thorough, and careful in his readings from across the political spectrum, even to the point of providing cogent explanations for his use of punctuation. Surprisingly, Waite points to a host of Canadian figures—Northrop Frye, David Cronenberg, Marshall McLuhan, Leonard Cohen, Arthur Kroker— to construct his striking case, making (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  17
    Nietzsche’s Dance.Marcella Tarozzi Goldsmith - 1990 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 2 (2):41-43.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  2
    Nietzsche’s Dance. [REVIEW]Marcella Tarozzi Goldsmith - 1990 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 2 (2):41-43.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  24
    Nietzsche’s Transfiguration of History: Historicality as Transfiguration.Paul J. M. Van Tongeren - 1994 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (2):23-46.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  11
    Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals.Joseph Ward - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):597-601.
  32.  24
    When Nietzsche’s Texts “Disappear Under the Interpretation”: Grasping Nietzsche’s Embodied Philosophy.Susan West - 2009 - Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):98-107.
  33.  6
    The Early Nietzsche’s Alleged Anthropocentrism.A. Nolan Hatley - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):161-173.
    Both Max Hallman and David E. Storey rightly argue that Nietzsche is critical of anthropocentrism in his later philosophy. However, both also claim that Nietzsche, in his early philosophy, is still held captive to an anthropocentric view, particularly in “Schopenhauer as Educator,” the third of his Untimely Meditations. Neither, however, explores Schopenhauer’s own nonanthropocentric, sentiocentric approach to ethics and its influence on the early Nietzsche. An exploration of this background and a closer reading of the essay and its larger contest (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  22
    A Vichian Footnote to Nietzsche’s Views on the Cognitive Primacy of Metaphor.Marcel Danesi - 1987 - New Vico Studies 5:157-164.
  35. Jung in Contexts: A Reader.Paul Bishop (ed.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    The current interest in Jung shows no sign of abating, with international controversy surrounding the origins of analytical psychology. _Jung in Contexts_ is a unique collection of the most important essays on Jung and analytical psychology over the past two decades. A comprehensive introduction traces the growth and development of analytical psychology and its institutions. The nine essays which follow place Jung, the man and his work, in three important contexts: historical, literary and intellectual. In historical context, Jung's visions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Jung in Contexts: A Reader.Paul Bishop (ed.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    The current interest in Jung shows no sign of abating, with international controversy surrounding the origins of analytical psychology. _Jung in Contexts_ is a unique collection of the most important essays on Jung and analytical psychology over the past two decades. A comprehensive introduction traces the growth and development of analytical psychology and its institutions. The nine essays which follow place Jung, the man and his work, in three important contexts: historical, literary and intellectual. In historical context, Jung's visions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  17
    Nietzsche's Theory of Decadence and the Transvaluation of All Values.George de Huszar - 1945 - Journal of the History of Ideas 6 (1/4):259.
  38.  18
    Affirmation and Mortal Life: Nietzsche’s Eternal Return and the Death of Zarathustra.Melanie Shepherd - 2011 - Philosophy Today 55 (1):22-36.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  8
    Was Heißt: Sich in Nietzsche Orientieren? A Review of a Selection of Recent Literature.Hans Ruin - 2018 - Nietzsche Studien Gesamtregister Bände 1-20 47 (1):410-421.
    This review essay brings together five books on various aspects of Nietzsche’s thinking and writing from the last four years, from different cultural and political contexts, but also spanning a wide methodological range. The general question of how to orient ourselves in Nietzsche-scholarship is inspired by the title of Werner Stegmaier’s book which invites the reader to compare Nietzsche and Niklas Luhmann. It also invites us to contemplate the more general question of how to bring Nietzsche’s thinking (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  15
    Dionysian Classicism, or Nietzsche’s Appropriation of an Aesthetic Norm.Adrian Del Caro - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (4):589.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41.  9
    Coping with Nietzsche's Legacy: Rorty, Derrida, Gadamer.Gary B. Madison - 1992 - Philosophy Today 36 (1):3-19.
  42.  44
    Nietzsche's New Darwinism.John Richardson - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Nietzsche wrote in a scientific culture transformed by Darwin. He read extensively in German and British Darwinists, and his own works dealt often with such obvious Darwinian themes as struggle and evolution. Yet most of what Nietzsche said about Darwin was hostile: he sharply attacked many of his ideas, and often slurred Darwin himself as mediocre. So most readers of Nietzsche have inferred that he must have cast Darwin quite aside. But in fact, John Richardson argues, Nietzsche was deeply and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  43.  38
    Nietzsche’s System.John Richardson - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    This book argues, against recent interpretations, that Nietzsche does in fact have a metaphysical system--but that this is to his credit. Rather than renouncing philosophy's traditional project, he still aspires to find and state essential truths, both descriptive and valuative, about us and the world. These basic thoughts organize and inform everything he writes; by examining them closely we can find the larger structure and unifying sense of his strikingly diverse views. With rigor and conceptual specificity, Richardson examines the will-to-power (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  44.  39
    Experimentation, Temptation, and Nietzsche’s Philosopher of the Future.Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):187-201.
    The method of the philosophers of the future that Nietzsche heralds, but does not self-identify with, has not received the attention it deserves in the secondary literature. In this essay, I address this lacuna with an interpretation of the roles of the philosophers of the future that explains in what sense they are and are not tempters. As free spirits, cultural physicians, and legislators, the philosophers of the future undertake experiments to acquire knowledge; hence, the philosophers of the future are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  19
    Postmodern Platos: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer, Strauss, Derrida.Michael Dink - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):183-186.
    Zuckert has written an intriguing book, whether taken in its exoteric form, as indicated by the title and introduction, as a detached and balanced account of the response to Plato of five “postmodern” thinkers, or in its esoteric form, as indicated by the assignment of the three central chapters to Strauss, as an exposition and defense of Strauss’s account of the truth about the human good. Even if her accounts of the other four are, for many readers, the honey on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Nietzsche’s Pragmatic Genealogy of Justice.Matthieu Queloz - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):727-749.
    This paper analyses the connection between Nietzsche’s early employment of the genealogical method and contemporary neo-pragmatism. The paper has two goals. On the one hand, by viewing Nietzsche’s writings in the light of neo-pragmatist ideas and reconstructing his approach to justice as a pragmatic genealogy, it seeks to bring out an under-appreciated aspect of his genealogical method which illustrates how genealogy can be used to vindicate rather than to subvert, and accounts for Nietzsche’s lack of historical references. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47. Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2013 - In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. pp. 727-755.
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  48. David Owen, Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. [REVIEW]Bryan Finken - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (3):214-216.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  17
    Book Review: Nietzsche’s Final Teaching, by Michael Allen Gillespie. [REVIEW]Shilo Brooks - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (3):424-429.
  50. Nietzsche's Positivism.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.
    Nietzsche’s favourable comments about science and the senses have recently been taken as evidence of naturalism. Others focus on his falsification thesis: our beliefs are falsifying interpretations of reality. Clark argues that Nietzsche eventually rejects this thesis. This article utilizes the multiple ways of being science friendly in Nietzsche’s context by focussing on Mach’s neutral monism. Mach’s positivism is a natural development of neo-Kantian positions Nietzsche was reacting to. Section 15 of Beyond Good and Evil is crucial to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
1 — 50 / 996